discrimination

Four experts on mental health sit on a panel at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival. From left to right they are: moderator Kenneth Rosenburg, psychiatrist and filmmaker; James Ashworth, interim chair of the Department of Psychology at the U; Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, psychiatrist and researcher at the U; Paula Cook, addiction specialist at the University Neuropsychiatric Institute; and Christena Huntsman Durham, vice chairperson and executive vice president of the Huntsman Foundation, which recently gave an unprecedented $150 million to establish the Huntsman Mental Health Institute at the U.

Destigmatizing mental illness

U of U Health partnered with Sundance for a panel of experts on the front lines of the mental illness epidemic in Utah.


‘I am multiracial’

According to new research from University of Utah psychologists Jasmine Norman and Jacqueline Chen, questions such as “What are you?” and other experiences of discrimination are related to mixed-race people’s identification as multiracial, particularly if that discrimination comes from monoracial people with whom they share heritage, or includes comments that a person’s appearance doesn’t match their background.


Gender at the crossroads

New book spotlights role of women in shaping Mexico’s social and cultural history.


Office for Civil Rights to visit the U

The U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights will visit the U Feb. 21-23. As part of this visit, OCR will hold five focus groups for students to attend.


ARTISTS AS ADVOCATES

Author of “The Color Purple,” Alice Walker, and acclaimed filmmaker Pratibha Parmar to visit the U discussing women’s rights and human rights.


DISSECTING THE HARMFUL MYTH OF GAY AFFLUENCE

U psychology doctoral candidate Larissa McGarrity reports that research on sexual orientation has largely focused on white, middle-class gay men, overlooking the diversity of LGB populations and the added burdens of financial stress and poverty.


Conflict, health and healing

The Tanner Center for Human Rights at the University of Utah will examine the long-term health consequences of exposure to conflict, including effects on veterans, children and victims of discrimination at its annual conference, Feb. 18-19.