NEW SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS

By Christopher Nelson, director of communications, University of Utah

Daniel A. Reed, Ph.D., has been named senior vice president for academic affairs at the University of Utah. Reed, who currently serves on the faculty at the University of Iowa, will start on July 1.

“Dan is an exceptional addition to the university’s leadership team and the thought leadership of our state,” said university President Ruth V. Watkins. “He is a talented scholar and administrator and the perfect fit in our efforts to become one of the country’s premier public universities. I look forward to working closely with him in the years ahead.”

At Iowa, Reed holds the university’s computational science and bioinformatics chair and is a professor of computer science, electrical and computer engineering and medicine. From 2012 through 2017, he served as the school’s vice president for research and economic development. Reed is a former corporate vice president and technology policy leader at Microsoft, the founding director of the Renaissance Computing Institute at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and was the director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois.

“Utah is a great public research university with a deep commitment to student success, breakthrough research and scholarship, effective economic development, and insightful partnerships that serve our society and health, and improve our world,” said Reed. “It is a university with an even more extraordinary future. As they say on campus, it truly is ‘Imagine U.’ I am excited to partner with its students, faculty and staff, and the residents of Utah, as we build that future.”

Reed’s most recent scholarship has focused on challenges and opportunities related to cloud and edge computing in both academic and corporate research settings. A graduate of Missouri University of Science and Technology, he earned his master’s and doctoral degrees in computer science from Purdue University.

In addition to his work on the faculty at the University of Iowa, Reed currently chairs the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee and the steering committee for the National Science Foundation’s Midwest Big Data Hub. He previously served on the U.S. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology, and the President’s Information Technology Advisory Committee. He also chaired the board of directors for the Computing Research Association, which represents doctorate-granting computer science departments in North America, and currently serves on its government affairs committee.

About the University of Utah

Located in Salt Lake City, the University of Utah is the state’s flagship university. It provides education to more than 31,000 graduate, undergraduate and professional students from all 50 states and over 100 countries. The university offers 72 major subjects at the undergraduate level and more than 90 major fields of study at the graduate level. With revenues in excess of $4.2 billion (FY17), the university is considered one of Utah’s primary economic engines. The institution generates over $600 million annually for the state of Utah in nontax revenue and is one of the state’s largest employers, with 16, 400 plus full-time faculty and staff. The university is a catalyst for a research corridor through northern Utah that is a hotbed for technology and development activities, colloquially known as Silicon Slopes.

‘THE CRY CLOSET’

By Marina Gomberg, director of communications and marketing, University of Utah College of Fine Arts

Contemporary art takes many forms. Our experience with a piece of artwork is the intersection between the artist’s intention and the audience’s understanding. It can be beauty and ugliness. It can be history and visions of the future. It can be therapy and play.

Nemo Miller working on her art installation.

And sometimes it’s all those things.

Last week, the University of Utah campus community and, in fact, the world at large, got to witness art’s power to open dialog and expose ideas. The catalyst was Art & Art History graduating senior Nemo Miller’s art installation called “A Safe Place for Stressed Out Students, Otherwise Known as The Cry Closet” in the university’s J. Willard Marriott Library.

With one tweet and in less than 24 hours, word of Miller’s installation became international news.

Miller is majoring in ceramics, but the piece was a work from a woodshop class as part of her sculpture minor. The assignment, given by assistant professor Kelsey Harrison, was to create something that acted as a social intervention. The project was part the class’ study of the art movement of the 1990s and early 2000s called Social Practice, which is characterized by artwork that uses the social fabric – our daily lives and public spaces – as its medium, often intervening in shared spaces to change their function or meaning. 

“There are often political undertones (and overtones) to the work of this movement since social space is always also political space,” said Harrison. “Take for example Michael Rakowitz’s 1998 project paraSITE in which he fabricates inflatable dwellings for homeless people that heat and inflate by attaching to the exterior outtake vents of the HVAC systems of buildings. This work, like Miller’s, draws media attention to a problem the artist has identified in culture. In fact, the degree to which media attention is directed by Social Practice works is often the degree of their effectiveness. What I mean is that Michael Rakowitz did not solve homelessness but drew media attention to the problem with his strange, elegant, improbable solution. Miller, similarly, offers an object that has drawn us into international debate. This conversation is the work’s success.”

More specifically, the assignment was to identify a problem in the University of Utah or College of Fine Arts community. Design and build a space that is a solution to the problem you’ve identified. Deploy your solution for the public.

So, Miller made what her own personal anxiety drove her to want – a safe and quiet space to take a breath and regain composure during the pressures of the last finals week of her undergraduate career.

She constructed a space that is roughly 3 feet by 3 feet and outfitted it with soft lighting, a plush interior and a timer to ensure no one person spends too much time in there at the expense of others who might want to use it.

“The inspiration came from my own experience of stress and anxiety,” Miller said. “I wanted to create and provide a space where students like me could decompress. The stress of finals is real for many students, and we’ve even seen from the overwhelming response to this piece that people in the work world want and need places to safely emote, as well. The need is universal – because it’s human.”

Like many of the most successful works of art, “The Cry Closet” has ignited a robust dialogue centered around the current level of anxiety of University students, what emotions are acceptable to express in public, and, of course, the definition of art.

“We’re proud of our Department of Art & Art History senior, Nemo Miller, whose art installation has sparked conversations about how we, as a campus community and as humans more generally, handle emotions and particularly those in public spaces,” said John W. Scheib, dean of the College of Fine Arts. “This is a fine example of how art has the power to reflect our humanity, to provoke thought and change the way we move forward together. We commend Nemo’s bravery, creativity and thoughtfulness.”

As a self-identified queer artist, Miller’s reference to the “closet” is commentary on how many feel pressured to hide their emotions or pretend they don’t exist.

For some, Miller’s artwork reinforces an erroneous stereotype that current college students are coddled, undisciplined and weak. The critiques to her piece, which pale in volume to its praise, ironically support her original premise as they try to invalidate the need for such spaces and demean those who would want to use them.

But the disagreement doesn’t bother Miller. Success, for her, is gauged by the number of students helped and the discourse created. And the volume of both continue to increase.

Miller’s installation was on display from April 22 through May 2 on the first floor of the J. Willard Marriott Library, but will arguably live on forever.

U TO GRADUATE 8,568 STUDENTS

By Annalisa Purser and Janelle Hanson, communications specialists, University of Utah Communications

University of Utah senior Hodan Abdi came to Utah with her family five years ago from a refugee camp in Ethiopia. She will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and an emphasis in biology this year, along with 8,568 other U students who will also celebrate achieving this milestone. The 149th general commencement ceremony will be held Thursday, May 3, 2018, 6:30 p.m., in the Jon M. Huntsman Center, and most college convocations will happen the next day.

Commencement student speaker Hodan Abdi (far right) attended Pizza with the President on April 10, 2018.

Abdi transferred to the U after studying at Salt Lake Community College for two years and will attend medical school this fall.

“My biggest inspiration comes from living in a refugee camp, where there was only one doctor for 10,000 people,” Abdi said. “There were so many people who would get sick and die from preventable diseases. I want to do something to help those people. I have all the opportunities I need here, so, why not?”

Originally from Somalia, Abdi’s family fled in 2008. As a high school student in a refugee camp, she didn’t have time to study during the day as she took care of her younger siblings, cooked and cleaned. With no electricity or technology, Abdi often woke up at 2 a.m. to study by candlelight.

Abdi explained that there were many challenges surrounding women and education. Almost 80 percent of her high school classmates were male, with most women getting married and having children at a young age instead.

“My mother always encouraged me to go to school and study because she didn’t have the opportunity to go,” Abdi said. “She always said education was my way out — my future. So, I’m not just doing this for myself. I’m doing it for people like my mother, my community and friends who didn’t get the chance to go to school. I want to do better for all of them.”

Once she finishes medical school and pays off her student loans, Abdi wants to start her own clinic and go back to work in a refugee camp to help provide much-needed medical care and distribute information about preventative measures.

“My life is so different than it was in the refugee camp,” she said. “There, you are trying to survive. Here, you get the opportunity to make your life better. Having access to education is like being rich.”

General commencement is a campus-wide celebration open to all students, their families and the public and is an opportunity for the institution to celebrate the graduating class and recognize student achievements.

About the graduating class and commencement details: (These numbers are based on data available prior to graduation and are subject to change.)

 

  • By the numbers:

    • Students in the Class of 2018 represent 26 Utah counties, all 50 states and 80 countries
    • 8,568 graduates
    • 9,113 degrees (some graduates receive more than one degree); 5,791 bachelor’s degrees; 2,343 master’s degrees; 703 doctoral degrees; 97 juris doctors; 101 doctors of medicine; 55 doctors of pharmacy; and 23 doctors of dental surgery
    • 4,410 self-identified men, 3,965 self-identified women and 193 nonbinary/unidentified
    • 3.37 is the average undergraduate grade point average
    • 26 is the average age of bachelor’s degree recipients; the youngest undergraduate is 19, the oldest is 69
    • 31 is the average age of students receiving graduate degrees; the youngest is 21 and the oldest is 63
    • The top 10 undergraduate degrees are: psychology, communication, economics, biology, nursing, business administration, mechanical engineering, human development and family studies, accounting and computer science
  • Speakers: 

    • President Ruth V. Watkins will officiate
    • Keynote speaker: Ben Nemtin
    • Student speaker: Hodan Abdi, who is graduating with a major in chemistry with an emphasis in biology
  • Special awards: 

    • Honorary degrees will be presented to Barbara Lindquist Tanner and Raymond Sonji Uno
    • The Rosenblatt Prize for Excellence, a $40,000 cash award and the most prestigious honor the university bestows on its faculty, will be announced separately
    • Faculty receiving special awards will be recognized
  • Schedule for college convocations 

    • Each college holds a convocation ceremony, where candidates for graduation are acknowledged individually and where college-specific awards are presented. College convocation schedules can be found here.
  • Transportation and parking 

    • Campus parking lots may be used at no charge during commencement and convocation ceremonies. As campus parking is limited, visitors are encouraged to use the free U shuttle service to travel between commencement events. Shuttles run throughout campus and are scheduled every 10-15 minutes. The U campus is also a TRAX free fare zone on May 3 and 4.
  • Watch it later 

    • Those unable to attend commencement will be able to watch the live stream on the university’s website, utah.edu/live.

MEET THE GRADUATES: CLASS OF 2018

“My mother and a close neighbor were involved in politics in Montezuma Creek in San Juan County before we moved to Salt Lake City when I was 10. I was always watching the news so I knew what was going on in Utah, the country and the world. Those two things are what piqued my interest in political science — not the politics side, but the research that goes into policy-making and legislation.

My older sister graduated from the U in 1994 with a degree in political science. I knew from her experience and learning about the U that its political science department was one of the best in the nation. I was able to do internships while a student with the Indian Health Service and the Navajo Nation’s Washington office, where I worked on Capitol Hill advocating for Indian Country.

It took me 10 years to finish because I took time to work and had some health issues. My parents and my siblings all encouraged me to strive to complete my degree. I also was encouraged by a university advisor, who told me I could it.

After graduating, I want to help build a better bridge and provide a voice for my home community. We are one of the original groups of Utah Navajos and, a lot of times when it comes to issues we face in our community, our voices get drowned out by groups off the reservation. I want to bring our voices and history to the forefront to help our community grow and also work with indigenous youth in San Juan County. I am planning on working for a year or two and then want to pursue a master’s degree in legal studies, focused on indigenous people’s law, at the University of Oklahoma, which will help me with these goals.”

— Jessaka Nakai, Class of 2018, bachelor’s degree in political science. Jessaka is half Navajo (Aneth Extension) and half Cherokee (Oklahoma)

My dad’s a pharmacist, and my mom’s a nurse, so health care is what I was born into. When I was little, my dad would bring me into the pharmacy while he was working and I loved it. I thought it was the coolest thing in the world. Ever since I can remember, I wanted to become a pharmacist. All these years later, my dad is going to do the hooding ceremony for me at graduation. That’s going to be a very special moment. 

I applied to the U after high school because it was a top 10 pharmacy school in the nation at the time and I thought it would increase my chances to get in if I went there for my undergrad. I became involved in Health Sciences LEAP, a program for underrepresented students in health sciences. That was huge for me. That’s how I met Dr. Mario Alburges for what was supposed to be one semester of research, but I ended up working with him in the lab for over three years. Initially, I had no idea what I was doing, but I was there early, I stayed late, and I think he recognized and appreciated that. He took the time to mentor me, not just in what we were doing in the lab, but in my professional development and in life. He’s been there since I was an undergrad and throughout pharmacy school. It’s special for me that he can see that the investment he made in me paid off.

 

I will give back to LEAP for the rest of my life. I came to this big university on my own with this goal, and not really sure how to accomplish it. LEAP gives you a direction, and they opened doors. If you work hard, stay focused and take advantage of the program’s opportunities, the sky is the limit and you can really accomplish anything.

Nathaniel Cordova, Class of 2018, doctorate of pharmacy. He will soon begin an Acute Care Pharmacy Residency in Orlando, Florida

“I could have branched out a little more, but I got immersed at the College of Fine Arts very early on and loved it.

Last semester, my work started to get good and I’m really proud of one assignment that’s part of the student show in Gittins Gallery in the arts building. The theme was, ‘Portrait without a head,’ about how you represent someone without physically representing them. So, I did my mom and made a 36-inch-long meth pipe. She was an addict and passed away when I was 12 so I felt comfortable that I could tell this story of her, through my eyes, without getting in trouble.

For two years, I was an Emerging Leaders Intern in the College of Fine Arts and helped plan networking events for ArtsForce. It’s a program that organizes networking events and workshops to help arts students articulate ‘Why an arts degree?’ and the value it provides in the modern workforce. We got to reach out to and bring to campus professionals from lawyers to financial planners to help us prepare for life after graduation.

Planning next steps, I’ve applied for some yearlong residencies in New York and Minneapolis that I really hope I get. I like the idea of being able to focus on the work, not handing in assignments for a grade.

Graduation for me means that at the base level, I’m losing my safety net that I’ve had for 20 years. My entire life, I’ve been in school – and that’s the scariest part. The most liberating things is now, I only answer to myself.”

Nemo Miller, Class of 2018, ceramics major and sculpture minor

“Training a service dog is a big commitment. Not only do you have to take food, water, treats, toys and other supplies with you everywhere, but you’re always training, and people stop you all the time, so quick trips take much longer.

It’s hard to explain what I get out of it emotionally, but I think I enjoy what the veterans get out of it so much more and seeing the life changes that occur for them. I’ll never forget when the first service dog my husband and I trained met his veteran. We were at the airport to meet our veteran. We saw him coming around the corner in his wheelchair, and he went straight to his dog, Ares (who he named after the God of War), and said, ‘I’ve been waiting a really long time for you,’ and for a few minutes, the pair were so connected they weren’t even aware of the rest of us around them. We had trained Ares for about six months, but once he was with his veteran, it was like we’d never talked to that dog in our lives because the two bonded instantly. Ares wouldn’t even come take a picture with me without his veteran.”

You can follow Labs for Liberty (@labsforliberty) and the dogs Nichole has trained: @ares_the_servicedog and @lyon_the_servicedog

— Nichole Ranuio, with @lyon_the_servicedog, nursing student, Class of 2018

“I started college at BYU when I was 17. I didn’t know what I wanted to do so after a few years, I followed in my grandfather’s footsteps and joined the Navy. I spent three years serving.

While in the Navy, I got my associate degree. After I was discharged, I transferred to the U.

It’s terrifying not knowing what you’re coming home to and I knew the U was where I needed to be when I came into contact with Paul Morgan at the Veterans Support Center.

The Veteran Support Center has become an integral part of my life at the U. I connect with people who understand what I went through. We can relate in a way that I can’t relate with other students anymore. It’s a place I feel like I belong and it has given me the college experience I wish I would’ve had when I was 17.

I’m going to nursing school next month in Alabama. I want to do Emergency Medicine—and one day hopefully get on a helicopter and be a flight nurse.

I injured my foot while in the Navy and I still have pain in my feet, legs and back. It’s tough having a part of your body not doing what you want it to do and having to rework your life around that. I know as a nurse I’m going to be somewhat limited with what I can do with my foot. My career will be short, but I’m looking at it as this short opportunity until I can no longer physically do it. That has helped me get the best out of everything since I know it’s fleeting.

I have this sense of service toward my fellowmen. To be out in the field responding to those serving would be the ultimate dream—to help them while they’re sacrificing so much.

I’m looking forward to getting my degree and that feeling of accomplishment. I’ve basically been working toward this for eight years. I’m finally crossing the finish line and while sometimes I wish I would’ve finished faster, I’ve learned so much with the experiences I’ve gone through.”

Rachel Martinez, Class of 2018, Russian major


“My score was announced. I remember the long sigh from the crowd filling the air as I missed qualifying for the 2014 Olympic team by just a few points. Considering that I prematurely returned from an ACL injury, defying the odds and opinions of doctors, I wasn’t devastated by the news. I was however terrified about the future.

Little did I know that moment of uncertainty would define the course of my entire education. After much reflection and a tour of the University of Utah campus, attending the David Eccles School of Business was a perfect path for me. I always wanted to go to college for business since I was a kid.

As a byproduct of becoming a professional skier at 15 — leaving home to travel the world while balancing school, negotiating endorsement deals and budgeting expenses — I essentially treated myself as a business rather than a traditional high school student. The University of Utah helped me build on these experiences and hone them into a course of study and possible career path.

Studying business with an emphasis in marketing was one of the most rewarding and natural transitions I could have ever asked for.

I could’ve never imagined that my college education would propel me towards applying one passion towards another. After graduation I plan on pursuing my passion for advertising, and to hopefully one day open my own agency where my passion for business and creativity can flourish.”

Walter Wood, Class of 2018, Business major


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OUTSTANDING FACULTY

Each year, the University of Utah recognizes the achievements of members of its faculty. This year’s honorees include:

Distinguished Teaching Awards

Roger Altizer
Associate Professor, Entertainment Arts and Engineering Program
College of Engineering
Associate Professor, Department of Population Health Sciences
School of Medicine

“What I’ve always found extraordinary about Roger, and a quality distinct among his peers, is his deliberate, nuanced and steadfast dedication to exercising student character coincidentally with their academic acumen. Roger unflinchingly strides into more challenging territory with his students and pushes them to develop internally, professionally and emotionally through innovative course structures and interpersonal interaction,” one nominator wrote. Altizer is a co-founder of the Entertainment Arts and Engineering program, which is one of the top-ranked academic videogame programs in the nation. He believes that people are at their best when they play and transfers this attitude to all of his students. He authored the “design box method” to teach students how constraint breeds creativity, and it is now embedded in game curriculum worldwide. This method helps develop students’ creativity in a constructive and directed way, and prepares them for a successful future working in the videogame industry. Altizer is passionate about using play as a tool for changing lives, whether it be through learning, experience or medical therapy. His largest project is the Therapeutic Games and Apps Lab (The GApp), where he sponsors between 20 and 35 students a year to build medical and other serious games and apps where they work with real people on real projects solving real problems. The students in the EAE program remark on how Altizer is the most annoyingly lovable professor they’ve had the privilege to work with.

Adrienne Cachelin
Associate Professor/Lecturer, Environmental and Sustainability Studies
College of Social and Behavioral Science

Adrienne has a unique ability to reach all of the students in her classes, wrote one nominator: “Through sometimes unorthodox, and often experiential methods, she strives to make learning a personal and emotional journey for her students.” Adrienne, who is  highly respected by her students and peers, has been at the forefront of transformative, community-engaged learning in the Environmental and Sustainability Studies program for a decade. Her approach to teaching is a fusion of active learning and graduate-level seminar discussions. She is a passionate advocate for interdisciplinary and community-engaged research. Adrienne connects students to the larger community to create collaborative and lasting networks for projects focused on building a more sustainable and just society. Adrienne’s focus on community extends beyond the classroom and her students; she has devoted significant time to the Salt Lake City Food Policy Task Force, the U’s Real Food Challenge and the Glendale Community Learning Center. Adrienne is a recipient of the Superior Teaching award from the College of Social and Behavioral Science, the Innovation in General Education Teaching award, the Public Service Professorship award from the Bennion Center, the Enlightened 50 award from the Community Foundation of Utah and the Equity and Diversity award from the Office of Equity and Diversity.

Kristin G. Cloyes
Associate Professor
College of Nursing

“Dr. Cloyes is one of the most intelligent, innovative and thoughtful educators I have had to pleasure to work with in nearly 45 years of academia. She teaches one of the foundational courses for the PhD program in nursing and has an extraordinary impact on every student,” said one nominator. Cloyes’ colleagues and students regard her as a master teacher, and praise her ability to communicate complex ideas in an accessible and compelling manner. Her areas of expertise include the philosophical foundations of scientific inquiry, qualitative and critical research methods, and scholarly writing.  She eagerly adopts new teaching technologies and pedagogical approaches by using innovative and current teaching methods to their full potential. During the past five years, she has served on 16 doctoral student committees, and chaired nine students to success; seven have gone on to academic positions as nursing faculty and one was awarded a prestigious postdoctoral fellowship at a major cancer research center. In 2009 Cloyes received the College of Nursing Outstanding Teaching award. In Spring 2017 she was nonminated for the University of Utah Distinguished Graduate Mentor Award, and in both Spring and Fall of 2017, students nominated her for the University of Utah Health Sciences Outstanding Educator Award of Health Sciences Graduate Students. These award and nominations support what one nominator said that all students know to be true: “[S]he invests completely in the success of her students.”

Lynn Hollister
Associate Professor (clinical) Emeritus
College of Nursing

“In and outside of the classroom, Lynn practices what she teaches. She inspires all of her students to be strong leaders not only in the healthcare setting, but also in the community,” wrote a former student of professor Lynn Hollister. Hollister played a key role for each nursing student throughout their College of Nursing career; her unique teaching talent created an honest and engaging classroom style that helped students explore the depth of the nurse’s role in patient care. She specialized in critical thinking, curriculum development and community engaged learning. She implemented a program of study pathway within the undergraduate nursing program, so that students could participate in a CEL course section each semester and meet the requirements for Bennion Center Community Engaged Scholar designation. She served as a leader in the Hospital Nursing Student Intern program, board member on the College of Nursing and President of the Westminster Nursing Alumni, and she continues to mentor her students well after graduation. She served as a board member of Sigma Theta Tau International, Gamma Rho chapter, the International Nursing Honor Society and was recognized for her excellence in teaching by that organzaiton. Hollister’s two Excellence in Teaching awards from the College of Nursing and the Utah Nurses Association Clinical Educator of the Year award further exemplify her excellent teaching and scholarship.

Lori Kowaleski-Jones
Professor, Department of Family and Consumer Studies
College of Social and Behavioral Science

“Lori has mastered the art of helping students to think critically about the assumptions they bring to topics such as traditional versus nontraditional families, marriage, divorce, remarriage and romantic love. Lori earns high marks from students for her approachability, upbeat attitude, and use of multiple teaching methods,” wrote a colleague. Lori’s teaching is marked by enthusiasm, wit, dedication and a positive impact on student success. She has perfected state-of-the-art delivery methods like a hybrid class that mixes online and face-to-face elements. This past year, Lori developed a fully online interdisciplinary course that will serve students from a number of majors interested in the intersection of medicine and social science. She is an engaged mentor to both students and colleagues. Lori serves on numerous graduate committees, guiding students with research projects and career development opportunities. Many students approach Lori to be on their committees, including some whose research interests do not align with hers. She takes great care to provide timely, constructive feedback, creative ideas and challenges that motivate them to complete their best work. Her excellence as a teacher is seen in the Department of Family and Consumer Studies, as well as the Masters of Public Policy program, which led to her receipt of the College of Social and Behavioral Science’s Superior Teaching award in 2016.

Distinguished Scholarly and Creative Research Awards

Christoph Boehme
Professor, Department of Physics and Astronomy
College of Science

As a condensed matter scientist, Christoph Boehme has made ground-breaking discoveries that are fundamental to the next generation of electronic and computer technologies. “Professor Boehme is one of those rare experimental physicists who has developed new cutting-edge experimental techniques and devices, [whereby discovering] fundamental new physical phenomena in substances that are of great current practical and technological importance,” remarked a colleague. “A common thread in his work is the use of elegant, innovative, and creative experimental techniques to reveal the most fundamental quantum properties of matter.” One of his most important breakthroughs was developing the pEDMR technique, a method for observing the quantum mechanical motion of charged electron spins in semiconductors. This has led to one of his multiple patents and has been instrumental in the development of new electronic and optoelectronic materials. He has published 93 papers in archival reference journals, and received multiple prestigious awards for his research, including a CAREER Award of the National Science Foundation and the silver medal in Best Physics Research from the International EPR Society. During Boehme’s 12 years at the U, he has supervised 28 postdoctoral, graduate and undergraduate students in their research. Professor Boehme’s creativity, productivity, and his impact on future technologies make him a deserving recipient of the Distinguished Scholarly and Creative Research Award.

Patricia K. Kerig
Professor and Director of Clinical Training, Department of Psychology
College of Social and Behavioral Science

Patricia Kerig’s research on trauma, family processes and developmental psychopathology is nationally recognized and is making an enduring impact across psychology and multiple other disciplines, as one colleague noted. Her research focuses on the developmental processes that account for risk and resilience among children and adolescents exposed to adversity. Kerig examines the impact of exposure to violence, maltreatment and family conflict, on children’s well-being and development, particularly in regard to delinquency and gang membership. She has more than 130 published articles and chapters to her name. Kerig also is the editor-in-chief for the Journal of Traumatic Stress and associate editor for other scholarly journals. Kerig has used her research for community service, leveraging the key role of childhood trauma interventions to promote youth well-being and reduce delinquency. She is currently investigating emotional, cognitive, interpersonal and psychophysiological processes underlying youth involvement in the juvenile justice system with a grant from the National Institute of Justice and is implementing a training to bring trauma-informed services to the Gang Reduction and Youth Development program of the City of Los Angeles Mayor’s Office. Kerig also has served as a consultant for the World Health Organization’s internet-based field studies for the forthcoming new edition of the International Classification of Diseases; the Utah Juvenile Defender Attorneys; Utah Department of Human Services; and the Utah Juvenile Court. Her work and expertise is having a positive impact nationally and in the immediate community.

Marc D. Porter
Professor, Department of Chemistry
College of Science
Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering
College of Engineering

“Professor Porter’s work is a hallmark of what research and scholarship at our university must be about. It is difficult to identify others in his areas of scientific research who have had a comparable impact,” said a nominator. Porter is best known for his work on self-assembled monolayer immunoassays, specializing in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection platforms. Porter and his team have also made a number of groundbreaking innovations in the SERS immunoassay arena, ranging from the ultralow detection of infectious diseases (i.e., tuberculosis) and cancer (i.e., liver and prostate), to the identification of trace levels of potential bioterrorism agents (i.e., anthrax and botulism). Early disease diagnosis is crucial for improved patient outcomes, and Porter’s group is dedicated to advancing the field of early detection for patients in all areas, and especially for those in low- and middle-income countries. His work continues to focus on exploiting the capabilities of SERS as a diagnostic platform, aiming to translate the technology from the laboratory to the point-of-need environment. In addition, Porter worked closely with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the Johnson Space Center to develop mission critical water quality monitoring systems; these systems are currently deployed on the International Space Station. 

Distinguished Faculty Service Award

Julie Metos
Assistant Professor, Department of Nutrition and Integrative Physiology
College of Health

“Dr. Julie Metos is an exceptional leader and educator who infuses dignity and compassion into her advocacy for community health,” said one colleague. Currently the associate chair in the department of Nutrition and Integrative Physiology, Metos is lauded by her colleagues as a passionate, collaborative and innovative leader whose dedication is as infectious as it is inspiring. Specializing in obesity and diabetes prevention, Metos acts as an advocate for children’s nutrition and has served on the Utah Health Education Core Standards committee to help craft the guidelines used across Utah schools. Perhaps the most notable of Dr. Metos’ efforts in educating children about the importance of nutrition is her work with the family and child programs of Driving Out Diabetes. These programs include “Crush Diabetes,” a week-long curriculum for middle school students that focuses on healthy eating and physical activity, and Food, Movement and You, a program for homeless families Beyond her contributions to better children’s nutrition, Metos is an advocate for emboldening young women and currently serves as the president of the board for Girls on the Run, an organization which empowers girls through physical activity and educational programs. Metos is a member of the Academy of Health Science Educators and has been published in “The Journal of Adolescent Health” and “Journal of School Health.”

Distinguished Innovation and Impact Awards

Nalini M. Nadkarni
Professor, Department of Biology
College of Science

“[Dr. Nalini Nadkarni] brings creativity, energy, compassion and intelligence, weaving together threads of seemingly distant and different worlds to create new ways of seeing, understanding and improving our world,” said one nominator. In addition to her extensive career as a forest canopy ecologist and teacher, Nadkarni is a champion for science education and engagement. She has developed innovative ways to connect people with science and nature through means that best speak to them. She studied the holy scriptures of major world religions, finding references to the spiritual importance of trees, and developed sermons on “Trees and Spirituality,” which she has delivered from the pulpits of churches of many religions. Nadkarni developed “Treetop Barbie” to teach young girls about the benefits of careers in science. Her Blue Room project, which allows inmates in solitary confinement to experience nature through videos and which reduced prison violence, was recognized by TIME magazine as one of “The 25 Best Inventions of 2014.” Nadkarni has delivered TED talks about the deep connections between nature and humans of all kinds. Herself the daughter of immigrants, she devotes effort to encouraging young women and minorities in science. She serves on the Governing Board for the Ecological Society of America as the vice president for Education and Diversity.

Jeffrey Rosenbluth
Associate Professor (clinical), Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
School of Medicine

Jeffrey Rosenbluth has promoted a vision of health, independence and an active lifestyle for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) in the Intermountain West since 2001. In 2003, he developed the University of Utah’s TRAILS Program (technology, recreation, access, independence, lifestyle, sports) with a goal of maximizing quality of life after SCI through innovations in wellness, sports, recreation, education and advocacy. TRAILS provides 14,000 community program hours, and Rosenbluth believes strongly in incorporating University of Utah students from diverse backgrounds into all aspects of program development and support. One colleague noted, “Dr. Rosenbluth has dedicated his career toward improving the lives of individuals with SCI, bringing awareness of the impact of disability to students of design, engineering and computer science to influence product design and accessibility for improved quality of life.” His work on TRAILS has attracted widespread support from leading funding organizations in the field, including the Craig H. Neilsen Foundation, the United States Olympic Committee, and the United States Veterans Administration. Over the last 13 years, Rosenbluth has obtained more than $3 million in support for innovative product and program development for individuals with complex disabilities. In 2013, Rosenbluth received the Craig H. Neilsen Presidential Endowed Chair of Spinal Cord Injury Medicine.

Calvin S. and JeNeal N. Hatch Prize in Teaching

Henryk Hecht
Professor, Department of Mathematics
College of Science

“Dr. Hecht is beloved by his students and widely praised for his command of the subject matter, for his engaging lectures and for his genuine concern for his students’ well-being,” said one nominator. As associate chair of the Mathematics Department, he developed a course management database to collect student data and enforce prerequisites for courses, ensuring students were able to perform in the classes they enrolled in. During his 40-year tenure at the University of Utah, Hecht has brought his personal passion and compassion into his teaching, devoting time to his students with genuine care into their well-being. Hecht believes in taking a hands-on approach to teaching, and has been known to devote extended office hours for group and personal sessions outside of scheduled times to ensure graduate students are well-prepared for their mathematics qualifying exams. His goal is for students to maximize their potential, both in his courses and beyond.

Community Engaged Teaching & Scholarship Award

Rosemarie Hunter
Associate Professor
College of Social Work

Rosemarie Hunter joined the University of Utah in 1995 and is a dedicated member of the social work faculty, where she focuses on building community partnerships within underrepresented and oppressed populations. She served as director of University Neighborhood Partners from 2006-2015, helping to foster partnerships across institutions of higher education, community organizations and schools. During Hunter’s nine-year tenure as director, U enrollment from individuals residing in west-side neighborhoods increased dramatically — from less than a dozen to more than 500 students. Today, Hunter’s work is focused on partnerships that extend social work higher education to individuals living in marginalized settings, often where social work education does not exist or where there is little access to higher education. Through online learning platforms and global partnerships, these programs are building the global social service workforce by preparing case managers, family and youth advocates, women empowerment workers and community health workers. Hunter serves as director of the Bridging Borders project, a university-community partnership between the U’s College of Social Work, Division of Occupational Therapy and Asia Center. Her significant contributions include serving and training refugee communities on the Thailand-Myanmar border and working with other institutions to develop the first undergraduate social work program in the country. She is currently the chair of the Board of Campus Community Partnerships for Health, an international network of scholars and practitioners engaged in campus-community collaborations around a range of community wellbeing issues.

Distinguished Graduate Student and Postdoctoral Mentor Award

Elizabeth Alice Clement
Associate Professor, Department of History
College of Humanities

Mike Kirby
Professor, School of Computing
College of Engineering

Bert N. Uchino
Professor, Department of Psychology
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences

Distinguished Professors

You Han Bae
Distinguished Professor, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry
College of Pharmacy

Cynthia A. Berg
Distinguished Professor, Department of Psychology
College of Social and Behavioral Science

Kathleen Digre
Distinguished Professor, Departments of Neurology and Ophthalmology
School of Medicine

Reid Ewing
Distinguished Professor, Department of City and Metropolitan Planning
College of Architecture + Planning

Eric A. Hinderaker
Distinguished Professor, Department of History
College of Humanities

Gerald G. Krueger
Distinguished Professor, Department of Dermatology
School of Medicine

Honors Professor


Christopher Mead
Assistant Professor (Lecturer)
Honors College

Public Service Professor

Erin Carraher
Assistant Professor, School of Architecture
College of Architecture + Planning

University Professor (two-year term: 2018 to 2020)

Sarah Projansky
Professor, Department of Film and Media Arts
College of Fine Arts
Professor, Gender Studies Program
School for Cultural and Social Transformation

Outstanding Public School Teacher

Cindi Dunford
James E. Moss Elementary School
Granite School District

 

CONVOCATIONS SCHEDULE

Below is a list of all the convocations happening this week and beyond, and here is a map to help navigate your way through.

Thursday, May 3, 2018

COLLEGE OF HEALTH
(Graduate Students)
1:00pm, Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
9:00am, Jon M Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
(Graduate Students)
9:00am, Kingsbury Hall

GENERAL COMMENCEMENT
6:30pm, Jon M Huntsman Center
________________________________________
Friday, May 4, 2018

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE + PLANNING
3:00pm, Olpin Union Ballroom

DAVID ECCLES SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
2:00pm, Jon M Huntsman Center

DESB EXECUTIVE MBA
10:00am, Rice Eccles Stadium Tower

SCHOOL FOR CULTURAL AND SOCIAL TRANSFORMATION
6:00pm, Olpin Union Ballroom

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
3:00pm, Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
4:30pm, Jon M Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS
12:00pm, Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF HEALTH
(Undergraduate Students)
9:00am, Jon M Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES
11:30am, Jon M Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF MINES & EARTH SCIENCES
12:00pm, Olpin Union Ballroom

COLLEGE OF NURSING
6:00pm, Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
9:00am, Olpin Union Ballroom

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
(Undergraduate Students)
7:00pm, Jon M Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL WORK
9:00am, Kingsbury Hall
________________________________________
Friday, May 11, 2018

S.J. QUINNEY COLLEGE OF LAW
10:00am, Kingsbury Hall
________________________________________
Friday, May 18, 2018

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
10:00am, Kingsbury Hall

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY
2:00pm, Kingsbury Hall

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Next Academic Senate meeting
Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018
Hwang recognized on prestigious list of “Top 10 Best Corporate and Securities Articles”
Plan ahead for field trips
Nominate a veteran
Campus Store textbook buyback
Join the Wasatch Experience


NEXT ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING

The next meeting of the Academic Senate is Monday, April 30 from 3-5 p.m. The following items will be discussed, among others:
  • New undergraduate certificate in quantitative research analytics
  • New track in earth resource management in the Professional Master’s in Science and Technology degree
  • New graduate certificate in emergency health
  • New graduate certificate in international affairs and global enterprise

The meeting will be in the Moot Courtroom (6th floor) of the College of Law. Meetings are open to the public. The agenda will be posted approximately one week before a utah.instructure.com/courses/51590/modules.


Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018

On July 17, 2018, Duo phone call and text message options for two-factor authentication (2FA) will be discontinued. Users need to select another method for Duo 2FA to log in to the majority of university applications after July 17.

The Strategic Information Technology Committee approved this decision for a number of reasons – most importantly, recent industry guidance and practice has indicated that phone calls and text messages are vulnerable and not considered secure methods of authentication. There is also a significant cost associated with providing these authentication methods. The phone call option was intended to be a backup or emergency method for using Duo, yet for many it has become their primary method. The new backup option for Duo authentication will now be completed through the central university help desks (contact information below).

You may choose one of the following options for 2FA, which are used by the majority of campus and U Health users:

Duo mobile app:

  • Easiest and fastest method
  • Install on a smartphone or tablet (includes Apple, Android, and Windows mobile devices)
  • Two options to authenticate:
    1. Mobile push notification (select “approve” or “deny” from your device’s home screen or Duo notification page – no need to type in a code)
    2. Type in a passcode (network connectivity is not required for this option)

Duo hardware token:

Visit the 2FA webpage, Duo 2FA overview article, and Duo tutorial video found in Pulse (U Health) or Bridge (campus) for more information. If you have questions, contact the UIT Help Desk (801-581-4000, option 1) or ITS Service Desk (801-587-6000) for assistance.


Hwang recognized on prestigious list of “Top 10 Best Corporate and Securities Articles”

Research by Cathy Hwang, an associate professor at the University of Utah’s S.J. Quinney College of Law, has been named among the “Top 10 Best Corporate and Securities Articles” by The Corporate Practice Commentator at Georgetown University.

Hwang is highlighted for her paper, Unbundled Bargains: Multi-agreement Dealmaking in Complex Mergers and Acquisitions, published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review.

Her placement on the prestigious Georgetown listing for 2017 puts her among strong academic company — less than 2 percent of articles in the corporate and securities field earn the Georgetown designation. The list is compiled based on a peer vote and is one of the only peer-approved designations of quality in corporate law — and reflects the choices of law professors teaching in this area from 560 articles.

Also notable is that Hwang is one of only two other pre-tenure professors on the list. Other pre-tenure professors on the list are from Stanford and Michigan.

The latest accolade is among a string of impressive accomplishments by Hwang since she joined the S.J. Quinney College of Law in 2016. In May 2017, she was selected to participate in the Stanford/Yale/Harvard Junior Faculty Forum at Stanford Law School to discuss her paper her paper, Deal Momentum, published in the UCLA Law Review,  which explores the role of non-binding agreements in sophisticated, high-value business deals.  Papers are selected for the Stanford/Yale/Harvard Junior Faculty Forum through a highly competitive blind review process. During the forum, accomplished senior scholars comment on the merits and methodology of papers to give junior faculty experience in the pursuit of scholarship and the nature of scholarly exchange.

Hwang has quickly established herself as an excellent scholar since arriving at the S.J. Quinney College of Law, said Amelia Rinehart, associate dean of faculty and research development.

“She’s clearly an asset to the College of Law in many ways and we are extremely proud of her early career success,” said Rinehart.

Hwang received her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School. Prior to joining the faculty at Utah, she was the academic fellow at Stanford University’s Rock Center for Corporate Governance, where she remains affiliated as a non-resident fellow.

Her other publications are available to download here.


PLAN AHEAD FOR FIELD TRIPS

Are you planning field trips, activities, or events with your class or group?  If so, plan ahead for special requirements, hazards, approvals, accommodations, liability waivers, equipment needs, transportation requirements and emergencies.  A field trip guideline checklist and approved liability waiver form can be accessed at Risk & Insurance Services


Nominate a Veteran

The University of Utah Veterans Day Committee honors veterans each year based on their honor, courage, commitment and sacrifice during their military service to our nation. Nominations for this year’s ceremony are due by July 31, 2018.

For more information or to nominate a veteran to be honored, go to veteransday.utah.edu or call 801-587-7722.


Campus Store Textbook Buyback

Congrats students, you’re almost there. Just a few weeks to go until the end of the semester, which means it’s time to start planning when you’re going to sell back your books. Textbook buyback at the Campus Store is designed to be as convenient and simple as possible for you, while also bringing you the best value we can offer for your books. Come sell your books at any Campus Store location anytime between April 26–May 5. If you follow us on Facebook (@University of Utah Campus Store), swing by a day early to avoid the lines.

Along with getting cash for your books, every student receives a candy bar and a chance to enter-to-win a $500 scholarship to use at the Campus Store. Mark your calendars and we’ll see you there.


Join the Wasatch Experience
Apply by May 4 at tinyurl.com/wasatchexp

Join University of Utah faculty in a quest to make sustainability teaching more exciting and relevant through the Wasatch Experience. The program engages educators in a two-day, team-based workshop in August, followed by regular small-group meetings during the school year. Participants design and implement an action plan to integrate the big ideas of sustainability into their courses. Upon program completion, participants are awarded $500 and receive the Sustainability Teaching Scholar designation.

The Wasatch Experience will be Aug. 8-9, 2018. Apply now.


 

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Tell us about your favorite teacher
Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018
Pre-summer intensive courses available
Next Academic Senate meeting
Nominate a veteran
Hwang recognized on prestigious list of “Top 10 Best Corporate and Securities Articles”
Join the Wasatch Experience


Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018

On July 17, 2018, Duo phone call and text message options for two-factor authentication (2FA) will be discontinued. Users need to select another method for Duo 2FA to log in to the majority of university applications after July 17.

The Strategic Information Technology Committee approved this decision for a number of reasons – most importantly, recent industry guidance and practice has indicated that phone calls and text messages are vulnerable and not considered secure methods of authentication. There is also a significant cost associated with providing these authentication methods. The phone call option was intended to be a backup or emergency method for using Duo, yet for many it has become their primary method. The new backup option for Duo authentication will now be completed through the central university help desks (contact information below).

You may choose one of the following options for 2FA, which are used by the majority of campus and U Health users:

Duo mobile app:

  • Easiest and fastest method
  • Install on a smartphone or tablet (includes Apple, Android, and Windows mobile devices)
  • Two options to authenticate:
    1. Mobile push notification (select “approve” or “deny” from your device’s home screen or Duo notification page – no need to type in a code)
    2. Type in a passcode (network connectivity is not required for this option)

Duo hardware token:

Visit the 2FA webpage, Duo 2FA overview article, and Duo tutorial video found in Pulse (U Health) or Bridge (campus) for more information. If you have questions, contact the UIT Help Desk (801-581-4000, option 1) or ITS Service Desk (801-587-6000) for assistance.


TELL US ABOUT YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER

Teacher Appreciation is just around the corner and we want to give you the chance to show your appreciation for your favorite teachers.

Email thisweek@utah.edu and let us know who you want to see included in our Teacher Appreciation article and why.


Pre-Summer Intensive Courses Available

Maximize your summer break with an intensive course May 7 – 11. Courses are offered Monday through Friday 8 AM – 5 PM with a one hour lunch. Course locations are on the Main Campus as well as at the University of Utah’s Sandy Center. Intensive classes will be as rigorous as a semester-long class and requires attendance at each class session. In addition to time spent in the classroom, students will be required to complete pre and post work. Explore courses at flexibleoptions.utah.edu. Questions? Call 801-585-9963.


NEXT ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING

The next meeting of the Academic Senate is Monday, April 30 from 3-5 p.m. The following items will be discussed, among others:
  • New undergraduate certificate in quantitative research analytics
  • New track in earth resource management in the Professional Master’s in Science and Technology degree
  • New graduate certificate in emergency health
  • New graduate certificate in international affairs and global enterprise

The meeting will be in the Moot Courtroom (6th floor) of the College of Law. Meetings are open to the public. The agenda will be posted approximately one week before a utah.instructure.com/courses/51590/modules.


Nominate a Veteran

The University of Utah Veterans Day Committee honors veterans each year based on their honor, courage, commitment, and sacrifice during their military service to our nation. Nominations for this year’s ceremony are due by July 31, 2018.

For more information or to nominate a veteran to be honored, go to veteransday.utah.edu or call 801-587-7722.


Hwang recognized on prestigious list of “Top 10 Best Corporate and Securities Articles”

Research by Cathy Hwang, an associate professor at the University of Utah’s S.J. Quinney College of Law, has been named among the “Top 10 Best Corporate and Securities Articles” by The Corporate Practice Commentator at Georgetown University.

Hwang is highlighted for her paper, Unbundled Bargains: Multi-agreement Dealmaking in Complex Mergers and Acquisitions, published in the University of Pennsylvania Law Review.

Her placement on the prestigious Georgetown listing for 2017 puts her among strong academic company — less than 2 percent of articles in the corporate and securities field earn the Georgetown designation. The list is compiled based on a peer vote and is one of the only peer-approved designations of quality in corporate law — and reflects the choices of law professors teaching in this area from 560 articles.

Also notable is that Hwang is one of only two other pre-tenure professors on the list. Other pre-tenure professors on the list are from Stanford and Michigan.

The latest accolade is among a string of impressive accomplishments by Hwang since she joined the S.J. Quinney College of Law in 2016. In May 2017, she was selected to participate in the Stanford/Yale/Harvard Junior Faculty Forum at Stanford Law School to discuss her paper her paper, Deal Momentum, published in the UCLA Law Review,  which explores the role of non-binding agreements in sophisticated, high-value business deals.  Papers are selected for the Stanford/Yale/Harvard Junior Faculty Forum through a highly competitive blind review process. During the forum, accomplished senior scholars comment on the merits and methodology of papers to give junior faculty experience in the pursuit of scholarship and the nature of scholarly exchange.

Hwang has quickly established herself as an excellent scholar since arriving at the S.J. Quinney College of Law, said Amelia Rinehart, associate dean of faculty and research development.

“She’s clearly an asset to the College of Law in many ways and we are extremely proud of her early career success,” said Rinehart.

Hwang received her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School. Prior to joining the faculty at Utah, she was the academic fellow at Stanford University’s Rock Center for Corporate Governance, where she remains affiliated as a non-resident fellow.

Her other publications are available to download here.


Join the Wasatch Experience
Apply by May 4 at tinyurl.com/wasatchexp

Join University of Utah faculty in a quest to make sustainability teaching more exciting and relevant through the Wasatch Experience. The program engages educators in a two-day, team-based workshop in August, followed by regular small-group meetings during the school year. Participants design and implement an action plan to integrate the big ideas of sustainability into their courses. Upon program completion, participants are awarded $500 and receive the Sustainability Teaching Scholar designation.

The Wasatch Experience will be Aug. 8-9, 2018. Apply now.


 

Highlighted Events

EAE 10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
Monday, April 30, 2018 | 1-8 p.m.
Building 73

On Monday, April 30, EAE will hold its “10 Year Anniversary Celebration,” which will include keynotes, a panel discussion and a reception. The keynotes and panel will be held in Building 73 on the University of Utah campus, 332 South 1400 East, (just west of EAE’s studios). The celebration will be held from 1 to 8 p.m.


NEXT ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, April 30, 2018 | 3 p.m.

Moot Courtroom, sixth floor, College of Law

The next Academic Senate meeting will be Monday, April 30 at 3 p.m. in the Moot Courtroom of the College of Law. Senate meetings are open to the public.

The agenda will be posted here approximately one week before.


SPRING STRESS BUSTER WEEK
Through Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Various locations

It’s that time of the semester! As finals approach, we have lots of ways to help you de-stress as you study here at the library. Therapy dogs, free yoga, donuts, coffee, school supplies and more.

Click here for a list of events. 


EAE LAUNCH DAY
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 | 3-6 p.m.
EAE Master Games Studio, Building 72, second floor

EAE will hold its “EAE Launch Day” to show off the latest crop of video games and medically-related apps developed by the program’s students. The event will be held from 3 to 6 p.m. at the EAE Master Games Studio, Building 72, 332 S. 1400 East, second floor. (Free parking for news media will be available in the lot just east of the building, which can be entered from 400 South just east of University Street).

Twenty games from graduating senior and master’s students will be on display including:

  • “Porcuball” is a physics-based puzzle game where players take the role of Quill, a porcupine. Roll around the woods and use anything that Quill can get his sticky little paws on to solve environmental puzzles.
  • “Forest Below” is a unique puzzle game that introduces players to the magical view of the world beneath trees. Weave your tree’s roots through various obstacles and dangers to collect enough water to grow to ever-increasing heights.
  • “Logout” is a stealth action-adventure game where your only weapon is emotion manipulation. Weaponize citizens’ social media profiles to upend The Neural Net’s system of guards.
  • “And I Must Scream” is a horror game for mobile devices that delves into the psyche of a young boy and follows him as he metaphorically and physically traverses the five stages of grief.
  • “Perspectives VR” is a virtual reality game made by students in EAE’s Serious Games course that will be on display at the Leonardo Museum in downtown Salt Lake City. The exhibit, which is sponsored by the museum and Google, allows users to engage in a museum exhibit in completely new ways.

Also on display at “EAE Launch Day” will be seven medical applications under development by The GApp Lab, which is supported by EAE, the Center for Medical Innovation and the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library. Some of the applications include:

  • “DDS (Diabetic Dental Story)” is a narrative-based empathy experience that explores the connection between oral health and diabetes.
  • “SupportGroove” is a journaling website that helps couples affected by a spinal cord injury cope with depression.
  • “Tilt Tracker” is a pressure relief tracking service for rehab clinicians and patients in wheelchairs to prevent pressure ulcers.

Entertainment Arts and Engineering, under the U’s College of Engineering, launched in 2007 and has quickly become one of the most highly regarded video game development programs in the nation. EAE has been ranked the No. 1 video game program in the nation for three of the last six years by the Princeton Review.


Fireflies in Utah?
Thursday, May 3, 2018 | 7-8 p.m.
Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter, 1258 Center Drive, Park City, 84098

Did you know there are fireflies in Utah? Learn about the biology and ecology of these fascinating biolumenescent beetles from Christy Bills, Entomology & Malacology Collections manager at the Natural History Museum of Utah. Bills will be presenting her research on these amazing creatures and providing all the information you need to participate in a local citizen-science project to contribute to their conservation.

This event is $10 per person, or $5 for Swaner members. Be sure to register here to ensure your spot.


SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY EVENT
Friday, May 4, 2018 | 6-9 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law Rooftop

University faculty, undergraduate juniors, seniors, and graduate students are invited to the rooftop of the S.J. Quinney Law Building on the evening of May 4.

The evening will feature TEDtalk style presentations on the theme of Interoperability in Electronic Healthcare Records. Dr. Russel Leftwich, Senior Clinical Advisor of Interoperability at InterSystems Inc., will address the group.

The presentations will then followed by a fully catered buffet-style dinner and networking mixer, where students can meet our industry sponsors to learn about what sorts of career opportunities are available in the field. It will be held on the rooftop terrace of the S.J. Quinney Law Building overlooking the SLC skyline. There will be an open bar for attendees who are over 21.

Please note: Our last event sold out, so interested parties want to register now for tickets (up to six tickets per person).

Click here to register.


EXPORTECH PROGRAM
Thursday, May 10; Thursday, June 7, 2018 
World Trade Center Utah

The ExporTech program will take place on April 13, May 10 and June 7 at World Trade Center Utah.

In partnership with U.S. Commercial Service and World Trade Center Utah, the University of Utah Manufacturing Extension Partnership (UUMEP) Center, is kicking off the first ExporTech program in Utah this April. ExporTech is a national program designed to help small and mid-sized companies boost their sales revenues via exporting.

The first class of participating Utah companies are:

B.E.S.T. Police Training, LLC: They are the world’s first police training simulator focused on conflict de-escalation. B.E.S.T. stands for Behavior Ethics Strategy Tactics and began as a thesis project at the University of Utah’s No. 1-ranked game design program. They are located in Park City.

Expedition One: Located in Ogden, they manufacture body armor, bumpers, rocker guards and recovery gear and equipment.

Madsen Cycles: They manufacture bikes that include cargo holders and kid carrier buckets. They are located in Murray.

Mud Buddy: Located in West Jordan, they manufacture high quality, higher horsepower shallow water motors.

Seymour Solar: Manufacturers of safe solar filters for photographers and astronomers. They are located in Escalante.

Taste Artisan Chocolate: They craft artisanal chocolates using traditional and modern technologies, and sell a variety of gourmet food products. They are located in Provo.


Restoring Balance Retreat
Friday, May 11, 2018 | 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way

The Resiliency Center and the Department of Psychiatry are co-sponsoring this year’s retreat.

The retreat is specifically for health care professionals suffering from burnout and compassion fatigue or simply looking for new ways to manage stress and increase resiliency.

More information and registration can be found here.


Immunology, Inflammation, and Infectious (III) Disease Initiative 2018 Symposium
Friday, May 11, 2018 | 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
I.J. & Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 N Medical Dr, Salt Lake City

The 2018 III Initiative Symposium is on May 11. Join faculty, staff, and trainees from various departments for a day-long symposium focused on the 3 “Is”: Immunology, Inflammation, and Infectious Disease. The agenda includes 8 UofU speaker and two-external keynote presentations. The day wraps up with a poster session that includes a trainee poster competition.

More information can be found here.

For the full schedule and how to register, visit our website.

Questions can be sent to Nicole Frank, Ph.D., associate director at Nicole.Frank@hsc.utah.edu.


Campus Events

EAE 10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION
Monday, April 30, 2018 | 1-8 p.m.
Building 73

On Monday, April 30, EAE will hold its “10 Year Anniversary Celebration,” which will include keynotes, a panel discussion and a reception. The keynotes and panel will be held in Building 73 on the University of Utah campus, 332 South 1400 East, (just west of EAE’s studios). The celebration will be held from 1 to 8 p.m.


NEXT ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, April 30, 2018 | 3 p.m.

Moot Courtroom, sixth floor, College of Law

The next Academic Senate meeting will be Monday, April 30 at 3 p.m. in the Moot Courtroom of the College of Law. Senate meetings are open to the public.

The agenda will be posted here approximately one week before.


SPRING STRESS BUSTER WEEK
Through Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Various locations

It’s that time of the semester! As finals approach, we have lots of ways to help you de-stress as you study here at the library. Therapy dogs, free yoga, donuts, coffee, school supplies and more.

Click here for a list of events. 


EAE LAUNCH DAY
Tuesday, May 1, 2018 | 3-6 p.m.
EAE Master Games Studio, Building 72, second floor

EAE will hold its “EAE Launch Day” to show off the latest crop of video games and medically-related apps developed by the program’s students. The event will be held from 3 to 6 p.m. at the EAE Master Games Studio, Building 72, 332 S. 1400 East, second floor. (Free parking for news media will be available in the lot just east of the building, which can be entered from 400 South just east of University Street).

Twenty games from graduating senior and master’s students will be on display including:

  • “Porcuball” is a physics-based puzzle game where players take the role of Quill, a porcupine. Roll around the woods and use anything that Quill can get his sticky little paws on to solve environmental puzzles.
  • “Forest Below” is a unique puzzle game that introduces players to the magical view of the world beneath trees. Weave your tree’s roots through various obstacles and dangers to collect enough water to grow to ever-increasing heights.
  • “Logout” is a stealth action-adventure game where your only weapon is emotion manipulation. Weaponize citizens’ social media profiles to upend The Neural Net’s system of guards.
  • “And I Must Scream” is a horror game for mobile devices that delves into the psyche of a young boy and follows him as he metaphorically and physically traverses the five stages of grief.
  • “Perspectives VR” is a virtual reality game made by students in EAE’s Serious Games course that will be on display at the Leonardo Museum in downtown Salt Lake City. The exhibit, which is sponsored by the museum and Google, allows users to engage in a museum exhibit in completely new ways.

Also on display at “EAE Launch Day” will be seven medical applications under development by The GApp Lab, which is supported by EAE, the Center for Medical Innovation and the Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library. Some of the applications include:

  • “DDS (Diabetic Dental Story)” is a narrative-based empathy experience that explores the connection between oral health and diabetes.
  • “SupportGroove” is a journaling website that helps couples affected by a spinal cord injury cope with depression.
  • “Tilt Tracker” is a pressure relief tracking service for rehab clinicians and patients in wheelchairs to prevent pressure ulcers.

Entertainment Arts and Engineering, under the U’s College of Engineering, launched in 2007 and has quickly become one of the most highly regarded video game development programs in the nation. EAE has been ranked the No. 1 video game program in the nation for three of the last six years by the Princeton Review.


Fireflies in Utah?
Thursday, May 3, 2018 | 7-8 p.m.
Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter, 1258 Center Drive, Park City, 84098

Did you know there are fireflies in Utah? Learn about the biology and ecology of these fascinating biolumenescent beetles from Christy Bills, Entomology & Malacology Collections manager at the Natural History Museum of Utah. Bills will be presenting her research on these amazing creatures and providing all the information you need to participate in a local citizen-science project to contribute to their conservation.

This event is $10 per person, or $5 for Swaner members. Be sure to register here to ensure your spot.


SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY EVENT
Friday, May 4, 2018 | 6-9 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law Rooftop

University faculty, undergraduate juniors, seniors, and graduate students are invited to the rooftop of the S.J. Quinney Law Building on the evening of May 4.

The evening will feature TEDtalk style presentations on the theme of Interoperability in Electronic Healthcare Records. Dr. Russel Leftwich, Senior Clinical Advisor of Interoperability at InterSystems Inc., will address the group.

The presentations will then followed by a fully catered buffet-style dinner and networking mixer, where students can meet our industry sponsors to learn about what sorts of career opportunities are available in the field. It will be held on the rooftop terrace of the S.J. Quinney Law Building overlooking the SLC skyline. There will be an open bar for attendees who are over 21.

Please note: Our last event sold out, so interested parties want to register now for tickets (up to six tickets per person).

Click here to register.


EXPORTECH PROGRAM
Thursday, May 10; Thursday, June 7, 2018 
World Trade Center Utah

The ExporTech program will take place on April 13, May 10 and June 7 at World Trade Center Utah.

In partnership with U.S. Commercial Service and World Trade Center Utah, the University of Utah Manufacturing Extension Partnership (UUMEP) Center, is kicking off the first ExporTech program in Utah this April. ExporTech is a national program designed to help small and mid-sized companies boost their sales revenues via exporting.

The first class of participating Utah companies are:

B.E.S.T. Police Training, LLC: They are the world’s first police training simulator focused on conflict de-escalation. B.E.S.T. stands for Behavior Ethics Strategy Tactics and began as a thesis project at the University of Utah’s No. 1-ranked game design program. They are located in Park City.

Expedition One: Located in Ogden, they manufacture body armor, bumpers, rocker guards and recovery gear and equipment.

Madsen Cycles: They manufacture bikes that include cargo holders and kid carrier buckets. They are located in Murray.

Mud Buddy: Located in West Jordan, they manufacture high quality, higher horsepower shallow water motors.

Seymour Solar: Manufacturers of safe solar filters for photographers and astronomers. They are located in Escalante.

Taste Artisan Chocolate: They craft artisanal chocolates using traditional and modern technologies, and sell a variety of gourmet food products. They are located in Provo.


Restoring Balance Retreat
Friday, May 11, 2018 | 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

Red Butte Garden, 300 Wakara Way

The Resiliency Center and the Department of Psychiatry are co-sponsoring this year’s retreat.

The retreat is specifically for health care professionals suffering from burnout and compassion fatigue or simply looking for new ways to manage stress and increase resiliency.

More information and registration can be found here.


Immunology, Inflammation, and Infectious (III) Disease Initiative 2018 Symposium
Friday, May 11, 2018 | 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
I.J. & Jeanné Wagner Jewish Community Center, 2 N Medical Dr, Salt Lake City

The 2018 III Initiative Symposium is on May 11. Join faculty, staff, and trainees from various departments for a day-long symposium focused on the 3 “Is”: Immunology, Inflammation, and Infectious Disease. The agenda includes 8 UofU speaker and two-external keynote presentations. The day wraps up with a poster session that includes a trainee poster competition.

More information can be found here.

For the full schedule and how to register, visit our website.

Questions can be sent to Nicole Frank, Ph.D., associate director at Nicole.Frank@hsc.utah.edu.