MEET THE GRADUATES: KANGHO LEE

“After I served my country for two years, I didn’t want to go back to the U.S. to finish my architecture degree (I went to Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia before my service). I wanted to stay in Korea for a while and audition for ‘K-pop Star,’ but after three failed auditions, I decided to go back to school.

Because I became deeply interested in politics and media, I looked for various ways to transfer to another school to major in communication. I also wanted to stay in Korea but wanted to get an American education. Coincidentally, I heard that a famous American university opened a new campus in Songdo, South Korea (University of Utah Asia Campus), so I thought that would be the best opportunity to change my life.

I think professors here are so amazing because of how they guide and inspire me to achieve my future dreams. One of my professors encouraged me to start making videos, so I started a YouTube channel, “Warub Couple” to introduce my Korean friends to American culture and I eventually plan to do videos that will introduce my American friends to Korean culture.

After graduation, I plan to go back to Korea and work for a major media corporation.”

— Kangho Lee, class of 2017, part of the first graduating class from the University Asia Campus

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NEW PROGRAM SUPPORTS AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDENTS

By Annalisa Purser, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

While African-American students are among the least represented at the University of Utah, the institution is launching a first-of-its-kind program designed to change that. The African-American Doctoral Scholars Initiative, which begins fall 2017, provides eligible students with annual scholarships worth up to $5,000, among other resources. Applications are being accepted through April 14.

The community-building program aims to prepare students for life after graduation by helping candidates develop skills including teaching, developing syllabi, submitting grant proposals, publishing and presenting research, etc. The scholarship award money may be used for research and conference travel, professional development and dissertation research and writing expenses.

“Many African-American doctoral students are only prepared to conduct research upon graduating,” said Deniece Dortch, program manager for the initiative and postdoctoral research fellow who joined the U in fall 2016. “We recognize these gaps and want students to be competitive on the job market once they complete their degrees. This program provides students with a network of peers, mentors and professional development workshops to set them up for success.”

To be eligible for the program, students must self-identify as a member of the African-American community, be accepted into a doctoral program at the U, be a full-time student, have earned a 3.0 cumulative GPA or higher, be a U.S. citizen and be able to demonstrate a commitment to understanding black life, history and culture in the United States.

Students accepted into the inaugural cohort will have opportunities to serve on research teams, present at national and international research conferences, attend workshops on grant writing, participate in dissertation boot camps, work with African-American faculty and alumni mentors and more.

The program was developed by four African-American professors in the College of Education, William A. Smith, associate professor and chair in the Department of Education, Culture and Society with a joint appointment in the Ethnic Studies Program; Paula Smith, associate professor in Educational Leadership and Policy; Karen A. Johnson, associate professor of education in the Department of Education, Culture and Society with a joint appointment as associate professor of African-American studies in the School for Cultural and Social Transformation; and Laurence Parker, professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy.

“We wanted to provide an opportunity for African-American doctoral students to learn from the academic socialization that we benefitted from as we earned our doctoral degrees, but take it one step further to provide a structured, intentional experience that doesn’t rely on an individual’s capacity for mentoring,” said Paula Smith.

When Dortch came to the U in fall 2016, she was a natural fit to manage the new initiative because her research focuses on understanding how African-American undergraduate and graduate students experience and respond to race and racism at predominantly white institutions of higher education.

“Deniece has been a wonderful addition to this program,” Smith said. “Not only does she have the academic background that meshes well with this program, but she also has the program planning and development experience that will make this program a success for the U.”

Program mentors include the initiative’s developers William A. Smith, Paula Smith, Johnson and Parker, as well as Steven A. Bell, assistant professor (lecturer) in the Department of Occupational and Recreational Therapies; Kamisha L. Johnson-Davis, associate professor (clinical) in the Department of Pathology and medical director for clinical toxicology at ARUP Laboratories; Clifton G. Sanders, provost for Academic Affairs at Salt Lake Community College and University of Utah alumnus in chemistry; Noël Mellick Volz, assistant professor of history; and Paul H. White, associate professor of social psychology in the Department of Psychology.

The African-American Doctoral Scholars Initiative is sponsored by the George S. and Dolores Doré Eccles Foundation and the Office of the Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at the U.

45TH ANNUAL POWWOW

By Estela Hernandez, public relations, University of Utah Office for Equity and Diversity

The University of Utah’s Inter-Tribal Student Association (ITSA) presents the 45th annual Powwow on April 7 and 8 in the Olpin Student Union, Ballroom. The Powwow will begin with the Grand Entry, April 7, at 7 p.m. and two entries on April 8, at noon and 6 p.m. Grand entries are part of cultural and spiritual traditions of American Indian nations, where participants parade into the dance circle in sync to the beat of host drums. This year’s host drum will be Red Spirit, celebrated drum group from Fort Duchesne.

This year, the theme for the U’s Powwow is “Be Legendary, Honoring our Unity: A Tribute to the Northern Ute Tribe.”

“We decided to take a different approach to the theme,” said Hailee Roberts, U student and chair for the Powwow committee at the U.

For the past few years, the Powwow has focused on the theme, “Sustaining Our Culture,” but Roberts said the committee wanted to move a step further and acknowledged that the number of Native Americans in higher education is low and that their presence at the U puts them in a position to do amazing things for their communities.

“We are grateful that we have the opportunity to get an education and take on the responsibility to be legendary.”

Though this year’s Powwow is dedicated to the Northern Ute Tribe, ITSA also wanted to highlight the unity that Native American tribes have demonstrated during recent events, such as the opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline.

“One of the most significant parts of Standing Rock was the fact that there were more than 300 federally recognized Native American tribes that supported the Standing Rock Tribe, even though some of these tribes have historically been at odds with each other,” Roberts said.

The 45th annual Powwow is free and open to the public. For more information, visit diversity.utah.edu.

FOSTERING GROWTH AND ACHIEVEMENT

By Estela Hernandez, public relations and events specialist, Office for Equity and Diversity

Harriet Hopf, professor of anesthesiology and bioengineering for the School of Medicine and senior special assistant to the office for faculty.

Harriet Hopf, professor of anesthesiology and bioengineering for the School of Medicine and senior special assistant to the office for faculty, has been selected for the 2017 Linda K. Amos Award for Distinguished Service to Women. The award was presented to Hopf at the Women’s Week keynote performance on Wednesday, March 8.

Hopf was chosen for her consistency in fostering women’s growth and achievement, both within her academic department and campus wide. She arrived to the university in 2006 as a full professor, and according to her colleagues in the School of Medicine Academic Affairs, has greatly influenced the climate for women on the university campus.

As the director of faculty mentoring at the School of Medicine and the lead for the School of Medicine’s Women in Medicine and Science Program, she created a recurring seminar series and workshops through which she mentored faculty members. She’s also advised and mentored undergraduate and graduate level students through her American Women’s Medical Association and the Association of Future Female Physicians. Sandhya Ravichandran, a 2012 graduate of the U’s School of Medicine said “Dr. Hopf has been one of the most pivotal mentors during my medical education and training… She instills trust, achievement, and ambition in all of the women she has mentored over the years.”

In her role as associate dean for Academic Affairs, Hopf led the revision of the Faculty Appointment Review and Advancement (FARA) statement to include promotion and tenure policies that address the importance of mentoring, teaching and non-laboratory based research. These changes have national implications for academic health centers and their faculty in addressing the gaps in promotion and tenure, particularly for women.

Since 2011, Hopf has served on the University’s Athletics Advisory Council. She chaired the Gender and Equity Subcommittee and the full AAC 2014-16. Chris Hill, director of athletics for the U, said that “under her leadership we have been able to identify areas that need improvement and have put together a plan to address any shortcomings” in order to improve the experience of female student-athletes.  The plan includes improvements to: locker rooms, practice facilities, access to academic support and scholarships. Hopf is a former college athlete herself and is known to lead the cheers from the front row of sporting events, and for supporting the female athletes in their personal and academic development.

About the Linda K. Amos Award

The annual award recognizes a staff or faculty member who has selflessly given time and energy to improve the educational and/or working environment for women at the U. Furthermore, recipients represent the ideals and actions of Linda K. Amos, for whom the award is named. Amos was the founding chair of the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women and served as associate vice president of Health Sciences and the dean of the College of Nursing.  She is professor emerita of nursing.

U STUDENT AWARDED PRESTIGIOUS HERTZ FELLOWSHIP

By Michelle Taliaferro, distinguished scholarship & senior academic advisor, Honors College

Ethan Lake, an undergraduate student in physics and math at the University of Utah, has received the prestigious and highly competitive Hertz Fellowship, a $250,000 grant for up to five years of graduate study in the STEM fields. Lake is one of only 12 students nationally to receive this award and the second Hertz Fellow for the U. The first Hertz fellow was in 1989, when Eric Kelson received the award.

PHOTO CREDIT: Ethan Lake

Lake applies his physics knowledge to defeat gravity. Here, Lake celebrates the victory atop a desert tower in Castle Valley, southern Utah.

“Ethan’s receipt of the Hertz Fellowship has opened the door for other U students to follow in his footsteps,” said Ruth Watkins, senior vice president for Academic Affairs at the U. “We have no doubt Ethan will continue to make a significant contribution to research and be an excellent representative of our university and state.”

The Hertz Fellowship, established in 1963 by the Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, seeks to support America’s most promising students in the applied physical, biological and engineering sciences who possess technical talent and the potential to solve difficult, real world problems. This year, 721 students applied and went through a rigorous merit-based process. The top 150 applicants were invited for an in-depth technical interview and of those, 40 were invited back for a second interview, with each interview increasing in difficulty.

“I found the application process, especially the interviews, to be intellectually rewarding and very enjoyable,” said Lake. “I would definitely encourage other students to apply.”

Lake’s passion for science began a world away in astrophysics. In his first year at the U, he joined professor Zheng Zheng’s computational astrophysics group where he studied the environments surrounding galaxies in the early universe and the gravitational microlensing of extrasolar asteroid belts.

“I’m extremely impressed by Ethan’s strong learning and research abilities and by his curiosity and creativity,” said Zheng. “He is truly exceptional.”

In the summer following his second year, Lake made an impulsive decision to switch to condensed matter theory, and began working on a problem in theoretical superconductivity with professors Dima Pesin and Oleg Starykh.

“Ethan has progressed steadily from a theoretical physics novice learning such basic theory as unitary transformations and second quantization to an expert in exotic p-wave superconductivity and many-body perturbation theory,” said Starykh. “This progress is truly amazing and in my experience, unprecedented.”

In fall 2015, Lake joined professor Yong-Shi Wu’s group to study topological quantum matter and in spring 2016 Lake was awarded the prestigious Barry Goldwater scholarship for excellence in STEM research. This past summer he attended the premier summer school on topological quantum matter at the University of Colorado at Boulder. In the school’s 17-year history, Lake was one of only three undergraduate students invited to participate. He also participated in a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergrads program with Michael Hermele, associate professor of physics, also at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

“His strong interpersonal and collaborative skills are extraordinary for someone who has advanced to the frontiers of science so early in his career,” said Hermele. “Ethan is on a trajectory to become one of the leading lights of theoretical physics in the 21st century.”

During his undergraduate career, Lake has written six first-author publications with another three papers either submitted or in progress. Through his research, he has collaborated with scholars at various institutions around the world, including Princeton University, Caltech, CU Boulder, Peking University and Tokyo University.

“I’m very grateful to the mentors I’ve worked with for their constant patience, and I appreciate the freedom they’ve given me to explore and think about research problems independently,” added Lake.

Lake is currently studying the role that topology plays in condensed matter theory and quantum information theory. In this field, he has found a balance between his aptitude for abstract mathematics and his desire to work on problems that can be tested by experiment. He plans to perform related work in graduate school, while pursuing a doctorate in theoretical physics.

“I’m psyched to use the freedom this fellowship grants me to explore different areas of theoretical physics. Graduate school is going to be a ton of fun,” said Lake.

High fives

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

Here are five cool projects highlighted in the 2017 Student Innovation at the U report, published by the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute. You can read the entire report, which celebrates the creativity and ingenuity of U students, here.

  • Low-cost air quality sensors: A team of electrical and chemical engineers, led by student Jonathan Whitaker, developed a hand-sized air quality sensor that costs $150. The team is distributing sensors to 150 schools across the Salt Lake Valley and has manufacture-ready plans for mass production.
  • Celebrate Everyday: Jocee Porter, majoring in computer engineering, managed to squeeze volunteering for Big Brothers Big Sisters between classes. There she met a 16-year-old girl who had recently lost her father and couldn’t afford a prom dress. Porter reached out to friends and soon had the perfect dress for the girl. As Porter shared the experience, she collected more dresses — and ideas for a business she named Celebrate Everyday. Porter now provides free dresses to women across Utah.
  • Dialed Cap: Evan DeGray, a Lassonde Studios resident and multidisciplinary design major, couldn’t find a tool kit that fit his bike the way he wanted. So DeGray, working in the Foundry at the Lassonde Institute, made one and launched a company — Rugged Components LLC — in the process. The Dialed Cap is the world’s first steer-tube integrated multitool.
  • Foster the Children: Utah foster children are getting a boost thanks to the creative teamwork of Daniel Hirst, an electrical engineering major; Meghan Pollard, a marketing major; and Caden Gregorie, an entrepreneurship major. The three came up with Foster the Children as a class project. The organization creates T-shirts from artwork of children in foster care. Proceeds from sales of the T-shirts are used to provide children in foster care with educational support and opportunities.
  • Project Embrace: Mohan Sudabattula, who is majoring in biochemistry, philosophy and health, society and policy, came up with Project Embrace in 2015 while volunteering at a pediatric clinic and seeing how quickly children outgrew prosthetic devices. The international nonprofit collects medical devices — such as crutches, slings, medical boots and braces and wheelchairs — that are still in good condition but no longer being used and repurposes them. In the process, it helps to reduce global health inequalities. Project Embrace is currently collecting items to donate to an orphanage in Hyderabad, India, this summer.

SHAKESPEARE MODERNIZED

By Josiane Dubois, Department of Theatre, 801-585-3816 or josi.dubois@utah.edu

The University of Utah Department of Theatre closes the 2017-18 season with “The Two Noble Kinsmen” at the Babcock Theatre, April 7-15. As one of 39 plays to be translated into modern English for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival’s Play On! Project, this play hopes to not only reach Shakespeare fanatics, but to make the work more accessible and inclusive to a broader audience.

The themes of “The Two Noble Kinsmen” are universal — love, honor, respect — but in the world of the protagonists, Arcite and Palamon, these ideas come at a much higher cost than for the average modern U.S. citizen.

“The world these cousins live in is one of turmoil, it’s war-torn, blood-drenched and controlled by the gods,” said Alex Vermillion, production dramaturg. “And yet, ‘The Two Noble Kinsmen’ reminds us that even in the darkest of times, there are moments of humor, gentleness and celebration.”

In this production, the director Randy Reyes, College of Fine Arts distinguished alumni and artistic director of Mu Performing Arts, created a world inspired by ancient Greece, the Blackfriars’ stage, war, “The Hunger Games,” hip-hop culture and high fashion.

“By combining all these elements, we are creating a unique world reflective of the past (Shakespeare’s original inspirations), the present (modern translation) and the future (with the next generation of Shakespearean actors),” said Reyes. “The translation celebrates Shakespeare’s masterwork by focusing directly on the antiquated language to increase understanding, while maintaining the vibrancy of the original.”

The play was translated by professor Tim Slover with production dramaturgy from Vermillion and Play On! Project dramaturgy from assistant professor Martine Kei Green-Rogers. The production artistic director is Bill Rauch and executive director is Cynthia Rider.

About the Play On! Project

Oregon Shakespeare Festival commissioned 36 playwrights and paired them with dramaturgs to translate 39 plays attributed to Shakespeare into contemporary modern English. By seeking out a diverse set of playwrights they hope to bring fresh voices and perspectives to the rigorous work of translation. Each playwright is being asked to put the same pressure and rigor of language as Shakespeare did, keeping in mind meter, rhythm, metaphor, image, rhetoric and emotional content. By the end there will be 39 unique side-by-side companion translations of Shakespeare’s plays that are both performable and extremely useful reference texts for classrooms and productions.

“The Two Noble Kinsmen” at-a-glance

Dates and times: April 7-9 and 13-15 at 7:30 p.m.; April 15 and 2 p.m.

Post-performance discussion: April 7 with Randy Reyes, director; Lue Douthit, Play On! director; and Taylor Bailey, Play On! assistant director.

Post-performance panel: April 14 with Ann Engar, professor of intellectual traditions; Richard Preiss, associate professor of English; and Disa Gambera, associate professor of English.

Location: The Babcock Theatre, 300 South University Street (1400 East) in the Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre, lower level. Free parking is available to the south of the theatre and at Rice-Eccles Stadium.

Tickets: General Admission tickets are $18, University of Utah faculty and staff are $15, University of Utah students are free with UCard and all other students with valid student ID are $8.50. Tickets can be obtained by calling 801-581-7100, online at tickets.utah.edu or at the Performing Arts Box Office located at Kingsbury Hall.

ONE SANDY CENTER

By Amy McIff and Cameron Beck

The University Campus Store continues to accommodate the needs of students, alumni and fans, now in the Sandy area. To this end, the U is excited to announce the grand opening of a new location. Utah students, employees, alumni, fans and neighbors are invited to visit the new store, grab a free J-Dawgs hot dog and drink, and enjoy fun family activities and prize giveaways. A special appearance by Swoop will be made, so come prepared to take photos and bring your family and friends.

Join the University Campus Store and co-host, University Federal Credit Union Friday, April 7, from 3 to 7 p.m. on the ground level of the continuing education building at One Sandy Center, 10011 Centennial Parkway in Sandy, just south of Sandy City Hall.

Believing that the campus bookstore is a fundamental part of the student experience, Campus Store Director Dan Archer is encouraged by the new venture. “We support the vision of Continuing Education and we’re responsible to make sure those students have access to the resources they need to succeed,” Archer said. “This store accomplishes that, and also supports the university’s purpose and core mission to promote education.”

Sandy One will operate as a full-service campus store, equipped with all of the technology, Utah merchandise, textbooks, UTech support and academic materials that students and staff in the Sandy area need, along with food and convenience items. The new store seeks to foster a better educational environment and serve the needs of the Continuing Education community in a location that is convenient to them.

An added bonus for grand opening attendees, select items will be available for up to 65% off. Additionally, alumni will receive a 25 percent discount on all regularly priced merchandise. Both discounts will run in the Sandy One location only, through April 7 and 8. Computers, electronics, textbooks, regalia, diploma frames and special orders are not eligible for discount.

Regular Campus Store Sandy One store hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Student Life

JUMP TO:
April is National Distracted Driving Awareness month
The Office of the Registrar announces electronic wait list
Save the date: Campus Store Apple one-day event on April 20
Matlab: Latest release available for download
This week’s Red & White Fridays winner
Mathematician honored for applying math to physiology
U student awarded fellowship to study in China
Athletics online store move to Utahutes.com
Real food labels arrive on campus


APRIL IS NATIONAL DISTRACTED DRIVING AWARENESS MONTH

Distracted driving is any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving.  There are three types of distracted driving – Visual: taking your eyes off the road, Manual: taking your hands off the wheel and Cognitive: taking your mind off what you are doing.  The technology in our vehicles allows us to make phone calls, dictate texts or emails and update social media all behind the wheel.  We are multitasking when we ought to be paying attention to driving and safety.  Please commit to distraction free driving and you may save a life.

Click here to go to the U Risk & Insurance Services website, where you can find out more about distracted driving.


SAVE THE DATE: CAMPUS STORE APPLE ONE-DAY EVENT ON APRIL 20

On Thursday, April 20, all Apple products will be available tax-free at the main University Campus Store and the University Campus Store in HSEB. Faculty and staff will save an additional 8 percent off of already reduced academic prices on all MacBook Pros, MacBook Airs, iPad Air 2s and iPad Pros. This semi-annual sale is exclusively for University of Utah faculty and staff and all are invited to save hundreds on a new computer or iPad.

All discounted items are limited to the stock on hand on April 20, so U faculty and staff are encouraged to reserve Apple products in advance at CampusStore.utah.edu/AppleEvent. Those who reserve their Apple products prior to Friday, April 14 at 3 p.m. will ensure they will be in store and ready for pickup on event day.

Full-time faculty and staff are also eligible for zero-interest payroll deduction on their new Apple products. Those who use payroll deduction pay only $20 on April 20 and the rest is taken automatically out of their paycheck for up to 12 pay periods.

For more information about the University Campus Store’s Apple One Day Event, please visit the store or call its Apple certified sales experts at 801-581-4776.


THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR ANNOUNCES ELECTRONIC WAIT LIST

The Office of the Registrar is excited to announce that electronic wait listing will be available beginning with your registration for Fall 2017 classes. That means that when you attempt to register for a class that is full, wait listing will allow you to add your name to an electronic list to potentially be added to the class if space opens up, you meet all the class requirements and have no time conflicts.

Wait listing does not guarantee a seat in the class if it remains full, and it is only available through departments who have decided to activate this new functionality. We look forward to bringing this new technology to the campus community. For a full list of departments who currently allow wait listing, a handy help document and answers to many frequently asked questions, please visit registrar.utah.edu/register/waitlisting.php.


MATLAB: LATEST RELEASE AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

The latest version of MATLAB – R2017a—has been released and includes a number of new features. Remember, the MATLAB Total Academic Headcount (TAH) Academic Annual License is available to students, faculty, and staff. This license is for academic (which includes both research and teaching) use purposes. Learn more about purchasing the MATLAB TAH Academic Annual License.

Pricing for each MATLAB license, which includes Simulink and the 48 products:

  • MATLAB TAH Academic Annual License:
    • Student – $20 per individual use license
    • Academic – $90 per license/seat for Individual, Group, and Concurrent Use licenses
  • MATLAB TAH Classroom Annual License
    • Classroom – $20.00 per seat for Concurrent Use licenses

New features for version R2017a include:

  • Regression learner app
  • Big data algorithms
  • Code generation
  • Bayesian statistics
  • Feature extraction

ATHLETICS ONLINE STORE MOVES TO UTAHUTES.COM

 

Utah Athletics and the University Campus Store have strengthened their long-standing partnership by designating UtahUtes.com as the official online store for Utah Athletics branded products.

Owned and operated by the University of Utah Campus Store, Utah Red Zone is the largest retailer for University of Utah apparel. With its new online partnership with UtahUtes.com, the University of Utah Campus Store plans to offer an even more robust selection of Utah products.

Online visitors to UtahUtes.com will receive free shipping on all orders of $100 or more and a portion of all sales go directly to University of Utah and Utah Athletics scholarships and programs.


REAL FOOD LABELS ARRIVE ON CAMPUS


Noticed a little white sticker on your recent campus food purchase? If you have eaten at Mom’s Café and Mom’s Pantry at the Marriott Library, or at the Counsel Café in the S.J. Quinney College of Law, you may have purchased an item with one of these Real Food labels. The Real Food labels are round icons on a white background, about the size of a quarter. The labels indicate whether your food is humane, eco-friendly, local, and fair, the four criteria needed for an item to be considered “real food.” The University has taken the Real Food Challenge, a commitment to offering 20 percent real food on campus by 2020. These labels help campus reach our goal by promoting the purchase of real food. Learn more about the Real Food Challenge and look for food with these stickers across campus.

Implementation of the labels is supported by the Real Food Challenge, the Sustainability Office, Chartwells, the Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund and the Office of Undergraduate Research.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
April is National Distracted Driving Awareness month
Save the date: Campus Store Apple one-day event on April 20
The Office of the Registrar announces electronic wait list
Matlab: Latest release available for download
This week’s Red & White Fridays winner
Mathematician honored for applying math to physiology
U student awarded fellowship to study in China
University committee service survey
What you need to know about the U’s rental car contracts
Athletics online store move to Utahutes.com
Real Food labels arrive on campus


APRIL IS NATIONAL DISTRACTED DRIVING AWARENESS MONTH

Distracted driving is any activity that could divert a person’s attention away from the primary task of driving.  There are three types of distracted driving – Visual: taking your eyes off the road, Manual: taking your hands off the wheel and Cognitive: taking your mind off what you are doing.  The technology in our vehicles allows us to make phone calls, dictate texts or emails and update social media all behind the wheel.  We are multitasking when we ought to be paying attention to driving and safety.  Please commit to distraction free driving and you may save a life.

Click here to go to the U Risk & Insurance Services website, where you can find out more about distracted driving.


SAVE THE DATE: CAMPUS STORE APPLE ONE-DAY EVENT ON APRIL 20

On Thursday, April 20, all Apple products will be available tax-free at the main University Campus Store and the University Campus Store in HSEB. Faculty and staff will save an additional 8 percent off of already reduced academic prices on all MacBook Pros, MacBook Airs, iMacs, iPad Air 2s and iPad Pros. This semi-annual sale is exclusively for University of Utah faculty and staff and all are invited to save hundreds on a new computer or iPad.

All discounted items are limited to the stock on hand on April 20, so U faculty and staff are encouraged to reserve Apple products in advance at CampusStore.utah.edu/AppleEvent. Those who reserve their Apple products prior to Friday, April 14 at 3 p.m. will ensure they will be in store and ready for pickup on event day.

Full-time faculty and staff are also eligible for zero-interest payroll deduction on their new Apple products. Those who use payroll deduction pay only $20 on April 20 and the rest is taken automatically out of their paycheck for up to 12 pay periods.

For more information about the University Campus Store’s Apple One Day Event, please visit the store or call its Apple certified sales experts at 801-581-4776.


THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR ANNOUNCES ELECTRONIC WAIT LIST

The Office of the Registrar is excited to announce that electronic wait listing will be available beginning with the Fall 2017 registration cycle. That means that when students attempt to register for a class that is full, wait listing will allow them to add their name to an electronic list to potentially be added to the class, if space opens up and they meet all the class requirements.

Wait listing does not guarantee a seat in the class if it remains full, and it is only available through departments who have decided to activate this new functionality. We look forward to bringing this new technology to the campus community.

For a full list of departments who currently allow wait listing, information about launching wait listing for your department and answers to many frequently asked questions, please visit registrar.utah.edu/register/waitlisting.php.


MATLAB: LATEST RELEASE AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

The latest version of MATLAB – R2017a—has been released and includes a number of new features. Remember, the MATLAB Total Academic Headcount (TAH) Academic Annual License is available to students, faculty, and staff. This license is for academic (which includes both research and teaching) use purposes. Learn more about purchasing the MATLAB TAH Academic Annual License.

Pricing for each MATLAB license, which includes Simulink and the 48 products:

 

  • MATLAB TAH Academic Annual License:
    • Student – $20 per individual use license
    • Academic – $90 per license/seat for Individual, Group, and Concurrent Use licenses
  • MATLAB TAH Classroom Annual License
    • Classroom – $20.00 per seat for Concurrent Use licenses

New features for version R2017a include:

  • Regression learner app
  • Big data algorithms
  • Code generation
  • Bayesian statistics
  • Feature extraction

UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE SERVICE SURVEY

We need your help, the university has almost 50 university-wide committees that need the active and engaged participation of our faculty (both tenure and career-line), as well as staff and students. Committee service not only benefits the university, but also provides an excellent opportunity for faculty members to get a glimpse of how the university works as a whole, meet new colleagues and further the progress toward reappointment and promotion.

Whether you want to advance the cause and practice of academic freedom, you are concerned about health and safety on campus, you want to work to increase diversity among our students and faculty, you want to be heard on matters of budget and planning, or you think parking on campus needs to be restructured and reorganized, there is an opportunity for you to learn about issues and to have an impact on how the matter is handled in our university.

Click here to begin the survey.

You can find a complete list of university committees here. You can find a complete list of senate committees here.

If you have any questions or want additional information, please feel free to email or talk to any of us. Our contact information is located here.


THIS WEEK’S #REDWHITEFRIDAY WINNER

This week’s Red & White Fridays winner is Madelyn Carter! Madelyn is a University of Utah student from Castle Dale, Utah who is studying Hospitality and Tourism with a minor in Spanish. By entering to win on Instagram using #RedWhiteFriday Madelyn has won $100 to Utah Red Zone and has also been entered for the Red & White Fridays grand prize – a $1,000 shopping spree at Utah Red Zone.

Next week’s winner could be you – just follow these three steps:

  1. Take a photo of yourself wearing Utes gear
  2. Tag and follow @americafirst and @uredzone
  3. Post your photo to Instagram using #RedWhiteFriday

Visit redandwhitefridays.com for more information about how to win a weekly $100 to Utah Red Zone, and don’t forget to wear red and white on Fridays.


MATHEMATICIAN HONORED FOR APPLYING MATH TO PHYSIOLOGY

James P. Keener, distinguished professor of mathematics, has been awarded the inaugural John Jungck Prize for Excellence in Education from the Society for Mathematical Biology. The prize is awarded for Keener’s 2008 textbook “Mathematical Physiology,” which has helped establish the field of mathematical biology. Mathematical biology applied math principles to organism functions, striving to understand how molecules move through a cell or how blood moves through a body. The prize, which is named for University of Delaware biologist John Jungck, will be awarded at the Society for Mathematical Biology’s annual meeting at the University of Utah in July.


U STUDENT AWARDED FELLOWSHIP TO STUDY IN CHINA

Courtney Wagner, a graduate student in Geology and Geophysics, has been named an East Asia and Pacific Summer Institutes for U.S. Graduate Students (EAPSI) fellow for summer 2017. EAPSI is a National Science Foundation program that enables fellows to conduct research in Asia and the Pacific and to learn about the culture and science policy of the host nation. Wagner will spend summer 2017 in Beijing, China at the Institute of Geology & Geophysics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. She will work with Yongxin Pan to study how the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field affects biodiversity in bacteria that are sensitive to magnetism.


WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE U’S RENTAL CAR CONTRACTS

Did you know the University of Utah has access to car rental companies using state-negotiated contracts?  Contracts are available with Hertz (contract # 0198552) as well as National and Enterprise (contract #XZ47075).

Travelers or drivers who use these agencies while traveling on University of Utah business do not need to purchase extra insurance or pay U internal fee.  However, insurance must be purchased for 1) vehicles larger than a minivan, 2) when renting outside the state contracts or 3) renting in a foreign country.  Instructions for renting vehicles can be found at the Risk & Insurance Services website under the Vehicle section, or by calling 1-5590.


HIP TALKS 2017 COMPETITION OPEN

Registration for the 3rd Annual HIP Talks speech competition is now open! The event honors the public speaking skills of former Utah Congressman Wayne Owens. It is sponsored by the Hinckley Institute of Politics and ASUU.

Students will prepare and give a two-minute speech on any topic in front of a qualified panel of judges in one of three qualifying rounds. Speeches at last year’s competition were on topics ranging from emotional stories of sexual assault and losing a family member to lighthearted subjects such as alien abductions and the difficulties of business casual dress.

A student can attend more than one qualifying round if he or she wishes. Students selected during the qualifying rounds will give the same speech in front of a panel of celebrity judges in the final round.

The student with the best speech will be awarded a grand prize of $5,000. The first through fourth runners-up will receive $1,000 each. An audience favorite winner also will receive $1,000.

To register and read the rules, click here.


ATHLETICS ONLINE STORE MOVES TO UTAHUTES.COM

 
Utah Athletics and the University Campus Store have strengthened their long-standing partnership by designating UtahUtes.com as the official online store for Utah Athletics branded products.

Owned and operated by the University of Utah Campus Store, Utah Red Zone is the largest retailer for University of Utah apparel. With its new online partnership with UtahUtes.com, the University of Utah Campus Store plans to offer an even more robust selection of Utah products.

Online visitors to UtahUtes.com will receive free shipping on all orders of $100 or more and a portion of all sales go directly to University of Utah and Utah Athletics scholarships and programs.


REAL FOOD LABELS ARRIVE ON CAMPUS

Noticed a little white sticker on your recent campus food purchase? If you have eaten at Mom’s Café and Mom’s Pantry at the Marriott Library, or at the Counsel Café in the S.J. Quinney College of Law, you may have purchased an item with one of these Real Food labels. The Real Food labels are round icons on a white background, about the size of a quarter. The labels indicate whether your food is humane, eco-friendly, local, and fair, the four criteria needed for an item to be considered “real food.” The University has taken the Real Food Challenge, a commitment to offering 20 percent real food on campus by 2020. These labels help campus reach our goal by promoting the purchase of real food. Learn more about the Real Food Challenge and look for food with these stickers across campus.

Implementation of the labels is supported by the Real Food Challenge, the Sustainability Office, Chartwells, the Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund and the Office of Undergraduate Research.