College of Science

Perseverance Rover’s journey to Mars

U alum Thomas Stucky, a KBRwyle engineer at NASA’s Ames Research Center, talked about NASA’s mission to search for life on Mars—and prepare for future human explorers.


Exploring the science of sea ice

U mathematician Ken Golden takes to the ice in a Frontiers of Science lecture.


SARS-CoV-2-like particles very sensitive to temperature

A new study suggests that as temperatures get cooler, particles on surfaces will remain infectious longer.


A laboratory, the camera looking down from above. A long beam bisects the center of the photograph, with a lab bench on either side. On the right is Angus Wu, an asian student in a lab coat, face covering, and gloves. On the left is Andrew Pendergrast, a white man wearing a blue lab coat, face covering and gloves.

Catalyst for safety

The College of Science and Office of Environmental Health and Safety have enacted creative solutions to rebuild a culture of lab safety—and it has paid dividends in implementing safeguards for COVID-19.


Trees and lawns beat the heat

As climate change pushes cities towards dangerous temperatures, planners must balance mitigating heat and preserving water resources.


Revolutionizing science classrooms

Graduates of the U’s Master of Science for Secondary School Teachers program engage in intensive research to bring authentic science experiences to their students.


Gamma-ray scientists bring distant stars into focus

For the first time in nearly 50 years, stellar intensity interferometry has been used to take the measure of the stars.


A bowtie-shaped spectral of lights representing the universe. The center is bright green, then radiates the hot pink, magenta, yellow, and then white and finally gray.

Largest 3-D map of the universe ever created

The results are measurements of more than 2 million galaxies and quasars covering 11 billion years of cosmic time.


Pioneering method reveals dynamic structure in HIV

The new technique can track molecules in real time, at room temperature, with impressive resolution.


Ribs evolved for movement first, then co-opted for breathing

A major transformation in vertebrate evolution was when breathing shifted from the head to the torso in reptiles. But what caused the shift? A study hypothesizes it was driven by locomotion.