College of Engineering

How U alumni helped invent the catalytic converter

The catalytic converter, which removes toxic gases from car exhaust, owes its invention partly to U alumni working at Corning Incorporated in the 1970s.


An empty symphony stage with one scientist in the middle measuring air flow.

Blowin’ in the wind

University of Utah engineers conduct air flow study to help Utah Symphony musicians stay safe from COVID-19.


Energy Center wins award

The honor is given to the highest-performing center in the country.


Gerald Stringfellow, an older man with white hair, and white goatee and wire-rimmed glasses, sits at his desk, holding a model of some kind of molecule — sticks attached to yellow and white balls arranged to form a three-dimensional grid thing.

Gerald Stringfellow’s bright idea

The legacy of the U’s mastermind behind LED-based technology was honored in a video from the National Academy of Inventors.


Science writer :isa Potter talks with professor Massood Tabib-Azar about the portable, reusable COVID-19 testing device that he is developing

Developing a device to detect COVID-19

Science writer Lisa Potter talks with professor Massood Tabib-Azar about the portable, reusable COVID-19 testing device that he is developing.


Humans of the U: Arnold Gatoro

Gatoro came to Utah as a child from the Democratic Republic of the Congo.


A sound treatment

Biomedical engineer Jan Kubanek has discovered that treatments of brain disorders may not have to require drugs or invasive surgery at all—just sound waves.


Portable, reusable test for COVID-19

U engineer Massood Tabib-Azar is developing a coronavirus sensor about the size of a quarter that works with a cellphone and can detect COVID-19 in 60 seconds.


Graduating in game

University of Utah’s top-ranked games program will hold their virtual graduation within an online video game.


ZAZ Corner, a digital gallery that showcases artwork on a huge LED screen in Times Square, displays a video of gold coins dissolving in a solution.

Reverse Alchemy

A huge LED screen in Times Square shows gold coins dissolving in a solution. York Smith, an assistant professor in materials science and engineering, facilitated the science behind the art.