addiction

Four experts on mental health sit on a panel at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival. From left to right they are: moderator Kenneth Rosenburg, psychiatrist and filmmaker; James Ashworth, interim chair of the Department of Psychology at the U; Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, psychiatrist and researcher at the U; Paula Cook, addiction specialist at the University Neuropsychiatric Institute; and Christena Huntsman Durham, vice chairperson and executive vice president of the Huntsman Foundation, which recently gave an unprecedented $150 million to establish the Huntsman Mental Health Institute at the U.

Destigmatizing mental illness

U of U Health partnered with Sundance for a panel of experts on the front lines of the mental illness epidemic in Utah.


Cultivating joy through mindfulness

New research shows that a specific mind-body therapy, Mindfulness-Oriented Recovery Enhancement, increases the brain’s response to natural, healthy rewards while also decreasing the brain’s response to opioid-related cues.


Deadly cocktail

A new study reveals the Utah opioid epidemic death toll includes an alarming number of new moms.


Kicking a habit

Preventing addiction with insight from scruffy dogs and ancient meditation.


Healing chronic pain and opioid addiction

Eric Garland, associate dean for research at the College of Social Work, has been appointed to a Multidisciplinary Working Group focused on a $1.1 billion federal effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the opioid crisis.


The science of addiction

The U’s Genetic Science Learning Center received $150,000 from the Utah Legislature in early 2018 to teach middle and high school students about the science of opioid addiction and the physiological and psychological aspects of pain, among other topics.


EXTRA, EXTRA, READ ALL ABOUT CONTINUUM

The winter edition includes: Genes and addiction, 30 years of student service, why humanities matter, top five dinosaur myths and more.


A Healthier U


HUMANS OF THE U: JUSTIN HUGHES

Justin Hughes was stuck in substance use disorder, which led him to crime, jail and prison. He thought addiction was going to be part of him for the rest of his life.