INCREASING COLLEGE ACCESS

Annalisa Purser, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

The University of Utah recently launched a new initiative called Our CASA (Communities Aspiring, Succeeding, Achieving), with six spaces opening at school and community sites across the west side of Salt Lake City. This initiative is part of a partnership with Salt Lake City School District, University Neighborhood Partners (UNP) at the University of Utah, local school communities and Google Fiber to help socioeconomically disadvantaged youth prepare for higher education.

The newest Our CASA space opens today, Monday, Feb. 27, at the Glendale Mountain View Community Learning Campus. To celebrate, there will be an open house where members of the public are invited to see the space and visit with representatives from the University of Utah, Salt Lake City School District, Google Fiber and other partners. All are invited to the event, 5-7 p.m., 1388 Navajo Street, Salt Lake City.

Our CASA promises to increase access to higher education for first-generation students and their families on Salt Lake City’s west side by strengthening college-going cultures in schools and decreasing barriers to higher education for students and families. Google Fiber helped to catalyze the project through a donation to fund computers, furniture and other resources in the spaces. Google Fiber will also be actively involved in supporting opportunities within Our CASA for increasing digital access and literacy for families.

Since November 2016, three Our CASA spaces have opened at school and community sites across the west side, with three additional sites opening this year. Designed by educators, parents and students at each site, the Our CASA spaces bring together school and community partners to offer space for a range of activities that address higher education barriers, including:

  • Support for college and career planning
  • Opportunities to develop digital literacy skills
  • Adult education classes
  • Parent-led meetings and events
  • Visits from college representatives
  • Online learning opportunities
  • Drop-in times for one-on-one counseling and support
  • Computers, printers and other technological resources
  • After-school youth and family programming

This project is an example of the University of Utah’s commitment to the west side of Salt Lake City, as demonstrated by the 15-year history of UNP. UNP aims to decrease barriers to higher education by uniting university and community resources. The idea for Our CASA emerged from UNP’s many years working with public schools in order to understand the multiple barriers faced by west side students and their families.

UNP has worked closely with the school district through the Salt Lake Education Foundation, as well as local school leaders, to bring the idea of a whole network of Our CASA spaces to fruition. Partners are continually working to bring these spaces to life with new programs and activities, including a multi-site series of college knowledge workshops and events funded through generous support from AT&T and A Capital City Education.

Our CASA sites are currently operating at West High School, the Salt Lake Center for Science Education and now at Glendale Mountain View Community Learning Campus, with plans to open centers at Northwest Middle School, Backman Elementary School and UNP Hartland Partnership Center by the end of the school year.

To learn more about the Our CASA program, visit partners.utah.edu/our-casa-network.

GLOBAL RECOGNITION

Scan the world from Norway to China and you won’t find a new university building much better than Lassonde Studios at the University of Utah, according to Architectural Digest, a premier publication for architecture news and trends. In a new report, the publication identifies Lassonde Studios as one of the nine best new university buildings around the globe.

“One of the first design elements guests of the University of Utah’s Lassonde Studios will notice is an all-copper façade,” Architectural Digest reported. “The $45 million project by Yazdani Studio of Cannon Design, in association with EDA Architects, opened in August 2016, and its copper exterior is made to fade and change color as it ages. … The structure is built on a grid system, which will allow rooms to be easily reconfigured as demands for the space fluctuate.”

The recognition is the latest in a wide variety of international praise and attention for Lassonde Studios. All students are invited to live, create and launch new companies here. The building houses 400 residents above a 20,000-square-feet innovation space on the first floor that is open to all students on campus.

Lassonde Studios is managed by the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute, an interdisciplinary division of the David Eccles School of Business that was recently ranked as the No. 1 program in the nation for aspiring entrepreneurs by LendEDU and the No. 15 graduate and No. 18 undergraduate program for entrepreneurs in the nation by the Princeton Review. Together, the Lassonde Institute and the Eccles School offer many programs, degrees and scholarships for students interested in entrepreneurship.

“We had a great team with a vision to accomplish Pierre Lassonde’s goal to build an iconic structure that would enhance the experience of our students and create more entrepreneurs,” said Troy D’Ambrosio, executive director of the Lassonde Institute and an assistant dean at the David Eccles School of Business. “It’s great to see his dream being recognized.”

Architectural Digest acknowledged Lassonde Studios alongside buildings in the United States, Norway and China. These buildings function as everything from classrooms and technology centers to student unions and dorms.

“Just as education around the world continues to evolve and innovate, so do the campuses that house the brightest future artists, scholars and financiers,” Architectural Digest reported. “These new structures make the grade for state-of-the-art technology, adherence to historic detailing and architecturally significant design.”

International attention for Lassonde Students began as soon as the project was announced. Months before the groundbreaking in October 2014, for example, Bloomberg Businessweek published an article titled “University of Utah’s New Dorm Mimics Google Headquarters.” In the article, it was reported that, “In a move it hopes will lure budding entrepreneurs who dream of souped-up Silicon Valley workspaces, the University of Utah plans to build a residence hall that blurs life and work the same way technology giants Facebook and Google do at their headquarters.”

In a more recent article from August 2016, The New York Times featured Lassonde Studios in a story about how “universities are investing in big, high-tech buildings in the hope of evoking big, high-tech thinking.” The New York Times reported, “The residential component has been absorbed into this live-work building, anticipating the early lifestyle of dot-com employees, whose living quarters usually resemble walk-in closets. The Utah version is more plush, however.”

Other notable attention includes articles by Fast Company, Inc. Magazine, The Associated Press, ArchDaily and many construction trade publications.

On top of attention from journalists and news agencies, Lassonde Studios received an award as the most outstanding public building over $10 million from Utah Construction & Design in 2016 and an “Award of Excellence” from the Associated General Contractors of Utah. Lassonde Studios is also a finalist for the South by Southwest Education (SXSWedu) Learn by Design Awards.

Learn more about Lassonde Studios and take a virtual tour at lassonde.utah.edu/studios.

CROSSING THE HALF COURT

Former professional basketball player and coach Jennifer Azzi will speak at University of Utah’s 10th annual Edie Kochenour Memorial Lecture, March 3, 12-1:30 p.m. in the Union Saltair Room, 200 Central Campus Drive. Azzi’s talk will be followed by several breakout sessions from 1:45 to 3 p.m. The event is free and open to the public, but registration is preferred.

March 9, 2015; Las Vegas, NV, USA; San Francisco Dons head coach Jennifer Azzi instructs against the San Diego Toreros during the first half of the WCC Basketball Championships at Orleans Arena.

Azzi’s speech is titled “Crossing the Half Court: Women Breaking Boundaries.” As a retired professional basketball player and distinguished coach, Azzi will discuss the success she has had in expanding opportunities for diversity and how individuals can create similar successes on and off the court.

“Though diversity efforts are well-intentioned, sometimes they don’t provide the wanted result,” said Lauren Weitzman, director of the U Counseling Center and chair of the 2017 Edie Kochenour Memorial Lecture Planning Committee. “We still have a long way to go to help and empower diverse populations to break societal restraints. Azzi’s remarks couldn’t come at a better time. We’re excited to learn from her breadth of experience in bridging the gap and paving the way for more women to be successful.”

Azzi is a former WNBA player with seven Hall of Fame inductions, an Olympic gold medal, a Stanford National Championship, the Naismith Award and the Wade Trophy, among other accolades. Azzi also has strong ties to Utah, playing guard for the Utah Starzz for three seasons. With a rich, 25-year career, Azzi has solidified herself as one of the most accomplished figures in basketball and has spoken about her experiences all around the globe, including at Generations for Peace in Dubai.

March 8, 2016; Las Vegas, NV, USA; San Francisco Dons head coach Jennifer Azzi cuts the net against the BYU Cougars after the game of the WCC Basketball Championships at Orleans Arena.

A leader and a motivator, Azzi was head coach at the University of San Francisco for several years, where she transformed the women’s basketball program from a poor performing team into a championship-winning group of athletes. She has also served as an ambassador and spokesperson for the NBA and Jr. NBA and is the All-Time WNBA leader in three-point field goal percentage at 54 percent from behind the arc.

This lecture series is in memory of Edie Kochenour, a leader at the University of Utah well-known for her energy and enthusiasm. In her 25 years at the University of Utah Counseling Center, Kochenour coordinated the Learning Enhancement Program and managed the counseling center’s consultation and outreach services. Kochenour’s vision for this lecture series was to connect strong women and discuss important issues regarding women in the workforce. The event is funded through an endowment created in her memory by her husband, Dr. Neil Kochenour, and commemorates her achievements during her robust career.

Previous Kochenour Lecture speakers include Dr. Chiquita Collins, who discussed moving the needle on diversity and inclusion and changing under-performing diversity initiatives; Ellen Ostrow, who spoke on issues related to work/family balance; and Nancy Hopkins, one of the primary authors of the MIT Women in Science report, which profoundly changed the way universities think about female faculty.

ACTIVIST AND ENTERTAINER

By Estela Hernandez, public relations and events specialist, Office for Equity and Diversity

Writer, poet, performer, activist and entertainer Staceyann Chin will deliver a performance of spoken word and poetry for the University of Utah’s annual Women’s Week, on Wednesday, March 8 at 12:30 p.m., in the Union Saltair Room.

Chin resides in New York City and identifies as a Caribbean, black, Asian and lesbian woman. Her written work has been featured in publications such as Essence magazine, The Jamaica Gleaner and The New York Times, among many others. Chin also writes for the stage and is widely known for co-writing and being an original performer in the Tony Award-winning “Russell Simmons Def Poetry Jam on Broadway.”

Among her many works, she is best known as the author of “The Other Side of Paradise,” a memoir that chronicles her childhood and growing up in Jamaica. Chin recounts being an outspoken child — always questioning things around her. She continued to be outspoken during her college years while coming to terms with her sexuality and identity. But it wasn’t until she was sexually assaulted on campus when her voiced was muted and silenced. In the book, she describes her attack as a form of punishment for openly being a lesbian and not conforming to a sexual identity placed upon her by peers. She talks about the anger after her silence and how it inspired her to write and voice issues around sexual assault through an artistic lens.

In a 2016 interview with Ebony, Chin stated, “I’m a memoir writer. I try to understand the world by taking experiences I have and making them into a story, whether it’s a narrative memoir, blogging for The Huffington Post, writing poems or talking on the screen about what has happened to me and how that relates to the world at large.”

Expressing herself and telling stories through poetry has given her the power to recognize that change comes from action. She firmly believes that those who have the power to speak have an obligation to address issues that impact them, but also to give a voice to communities that do not have the power to speak as loudly, or even at all.

Chin will deliver a poetry reading and performance entitled “Your Silence Will Not Protect You.” Much like Audre Lorde urges in her iconic 1977 speech to the Modern Language Association, Chin has taken on the work of transforming silence into language and action. Poetry, writing and performance are the vehicles Chin uses to interrupt silence and speak loudly against a patriarchy that silences those who have experienced racial and gendered violence.

In addition to the performance on March 8, Chin will lead a writing/activism workshop on Thursday, March 9, at 12 p.m. in the Union West Ballroom. For more details about Chin and information on all 2017 Women’s Week events, click here.

ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER

Annalisa Purser, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

University College was born in 1998 and serves as the focus of advising support for students transitioning to the University of Utah — whether they are still exploring their options or they already know what they want to study. University College recently changed its name to the Academic Advising Center to more accurately reflect the services it offers. The Academic Advising Center still provides students with the tools and resources to explore majors and outline a path to graduation, but the new name helps everyone better recognize the office.

@TheU spoke with Beth Howard, associate dean of the Academic Advising Center, to learn more about what the center does and how the name change impacts  the campus community.

Q: What is academic advising?

A: Academic advising is a full spectrum of services to students that includes assistance with major exploration, academic and professional goal identification, identification of university resources and policies, and degree planning.

Advisors typically work individually with students with the goal of maximizing their experience at the U. It’s more than selecting  classes, advisors help students design an academic path that will enable them to complete their degrees within a reasonable timeframe and adequately prepare them for their post-college lives.

Q: What programs are in the Academic Advising Center, and how do they support student success?

A: Our office is designed to help all students who have not declared a major. Exploratory students are assigned to an advisor who works with them throughout the major exploration process. Additionally, our advisors help students who are on the pre-law or pre-health track but may still be exploring a specific major.

The Major Exploration Program includes open houses and the annual Major Expo where students can learn about a variety of degree options at once.

PreProfessional advising is available to students who are interested in pursuing graduate degrees in law and the health professions. This ensures that they have a plan to meet all the requirements needed for those professions.

The Transfer Program works to support the advising needs of students as they transition to the U. We work with advisors across campus to provide necessary advising at key points during a student’s time at the U. This ensures they are meeting their milestones and progressing toward a degree.

Additionally, the office administers academic standards such as the Dean’s List and academic probation. It also provides advising technologies, such as My Degree Dashboard (formerly DARS), and programs designed to help other campus advisors.

Q: How many advisors does the Academic Advising Center have and where are they located?

A: We have 21 staff members with varying levels of advising responsibilities and are linked to 14 advisors from academic departments or colleges who participate in our Bridge Advising Program. The Transfer Program advisors also provide on-site advising at Salt Lake Community College on a regular basis.

Most of our advisors are located in the Student Services Building (SSB) in Room 450. We also have advisors on the second floor of the Marriott Library and in HPER North; the Pre-Professional Advising Office is in Building 44.

You can sign up for an advising appointment online at advising.utah.edu or by calling the Academic Advising Center at (801) 581-8146

Q: How will the change impact services or programs?

A: Our services will not change as a function of the new name. The objective was to make our services more transparent, inclusive and accessible. We want students to know who we are and what we can do for them.

MARDI GRAS MADNESS

By Clare Duignan, editorial specialist, University Marketing and Communications

Glutting myself on ice cream, cake and baked goodies is the activity that comes to my mind when I think of Mardi Gras. It is “Fat Tuesday,” after all. Mardi Gras marks the end of Carnival season, which starts on Jan. 6. As Mardi Gras is always the day before Ash Wednesday, which begins the Lenten season for many Christian religions, it is the last day for one’s vices before the 40-day abstinence.

Although it is considered a Christian holiday, having been declared such by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582, Mardi Gras has its roots in pagan spring festivals. It is believed that the ancient Roman festivals of Saturnalia and Lupercalia greatly influenced many of the traditions used in the Mardi Gras celebrations, such as masquerades and feasting. Massive celebrations are held worldwide as a final hurrah to fatty foods, drinks and sweets. The most well-known Mardi Gras celebrations are in New Orleans and Rio de Janeiro.

Lucky for you, the University of Utah hosts one of the best Mardi Gras parties in town. Mardi Gras falls on Feb. 28 this year, and students are encouraged to “get crazy” with dining services from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. at the Peterson Heritage Center dining hall. Past years’ menus have included authentic Cajun staples such as jambalaya, hush puppies, crawfish etouffee, frog legs, alligator, shrimp po’ boys, king cake and more. Be sure to join in on the fun of Mardi Gras and celebrate good food, friends and cake.

5 FACTS ABOUT MARDI GRAS

  • Mardi Gras became a legal holiday in Louisiana in 1875.
  • Official colors of Mardi Gras are purple, gold and green, which stand for justice, power and faith, respectively.
  • Riders on Mardi Gras floats in New Orleans are required by law to wear masks.
  • King cake, a Mardi Gras staple, varies from area to area, but is basically hollow circle cake topped with glaze and sugar, with a plastic baby figurine baked into it. Whomever gets the figurine in his or her slice is said to have good luck all year.
  • Mardi Gras parades in New Orleans are planned by organizations called Krewes.

MEETING YOUR SERVICE NEEDS

By Shireen Ghorbani, Facilities Management

Facilities Management is here to help with many of your service needs.

Every now and then, we like to remind campus of some of the different kinds of support we provide. We can help with keys or building access, remodels and renovations, custodial services, custom cabinets and metal work, and much, much more. If you need a basic service (small repair, leak, hot/cold room) jump into CIS and put in a request. If it is something more complicated, give us a call at 801-581-7221. We are here to be your support and your partner in maintaining and creating our campus environment.

HUMANS OF THE U

“I work with astrophysics and gamma rays. When a star is very big and it bursts, it will become something called a supernova. That’s not so interesting when you see it in normal light, but in X-rays and gamma rays you can see a lot more details. We also use gamma rays to understand what physics is going on in objects like distant galaxy cores, black holes and neutron stars.Physics is really male-dominated, and that can be hard. Women drop out of STEM fields so often for multiple reasons. That’s why our department has Women in Physics and Astronomy (WomPA). A lot of our graduate students are married, or have children, and sometimes you can’t unwind when you come home, and you can’t unwind when you come to work, and it becomes so difficult. WomPA is like a community gathering place, and just knowing there are other people going through the same difficulties as you is a big help.”

Payel Kar, doctoral candidate in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and member of WomPA

“I lost my wallet after riding TRAX one day. I didn’t want to accept that it was gone for good and get everything replaced. I had gift cards in there that I didn’t want to give up on. Almost four weeks later, I was riding the train when a woman sitting near me asked if my name was Brent Packer. I was thinking, ‘Who is this person, and how does she know my full name?’ But then she told me she had found my wallet. I almost didn’t believe her because it seemed too far-fetched. To me, that experience was the epitome of a coincidence. She was very apologetic that she had my wallet for so long, and she had even tried to return it, but I had moved from the address on my license. The first thing I did after I got it back was keep it in a safe place for a few days. When I started using it again, I wanted to get one of those GPS trackers you can keep in your wallet, but Santa didn’t bring one.”

Brent Packer, U student

“I’ve worked night shifts for Facilities for 40 years. I’ve always been a night person. As a kid, I would wake up in the middle of the night and try to make oatmeal cookies.

I retire at the end of the January and I’ll miss providing a service. I don’t look at it as work.

I follow my own “Golden Rule of custodial.” Which is, the cleaner you leave it as a custodian, the cleaner the customer is going to leave it for you. No one wants to be the first one to mess something up. Because there is a difference between someone trying to make a basket in a waste can and missing and that same person just leaving trash on the ground.

For the person taking my place, I would tell them to pay attention to details. Be here as much as you can be because if you let those details slide, it will take you a month of Sunday’s to bring it back up.

Being here and keeping up on the details are the most important.”

Ray Stout, facilities nightshift custodian

“On the first day of my master of social work program I heard about a study abroad trip to Kumasi, Ashanti, Ghana, during spring break 2016. I am interested in pairing my mental health experience with working internationally so I applied immediately and got in.

The U helped Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology set up a social work program several years ago. Our project was to conduct focus groups to find out how the program is going and how it could be improved.

After our focus group, students asked us about our lives. They use American and British textbooks and one student asked me why there was a chapter devoted to managing stress. She explained to me that the concept of stress as we understand it — they don’t experience that in Ghana because they live in the here and now. She also brought up anxiety and depression, which are described in the textbooks, and asked why this is such a problem. I told her we have so many expectations that we feel we can’t meet. She said, ‘Why not? Why can’t you just accept and love where you’re at right now?’ What she said really stuck with me.”

Nicole Shaw, social work graduate student

Yessenia Sontay on the left and Ciriac Alvarez Valle on the right.

Valle: “There’s a lot of backlash when you tell your story. When you expose yourself, you also expose your family. Whether we have documentation or not, our lives matter.

Sontay: It’s valid to be scared with the negative stigma surrounding documentation.

Valle: We can’t apply for FAFSA so our education is funded through private scholarships or work. We need DACA and there are a lot of people who want it to go away.

Sontay: I’m so appreciative of DACA, but it’s not enough. I don’t want it to just be me. I want my family to feel safe, too.

Valle: Our families deserve to live without fear of deportation. Most people don’t see it because they don’t live through it. Their lives have never been at stake in this way. It’s not until they finally see a face or a person, they know that the issue becomes real.

Sontay: Just because we don’t have a piece of paper, we shouldn’t feel unsafe. A piece of paper isn’t who you are.”

U students Ciriac Alvarez Valle, senior and Yessenia Sontay, junior

From left to right: Tzvia Berrin-Reinstein, Ana Breton and Samantha Bee at the Democratic National Convention in 2016.

“I’m a digital producer at “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee.” On a daily basis, our digital team will pitch and execute ideas for original videos, tweets and content for our social media sites. My main focus is working on original videos, most of which I produce, direct and edit. On show nights I’m in charge of building the website, SamanthaBee.com. Since the show revolves around politics, we’re also constantly finding funny and sharp ways to respond to the news – which will either become a breeze or a horrible, terrible nightmare in the next four years.

I graduated from the U with two degrees: film studies and communication. After I graduated, I worked on shooting documentaries, which I loved. Three years ago, however, I decided to move to New York (with my amazing husband, who I met at the U) to pursue comedy. I was a member of the improv/sketch group Friday Night Live at the U, and I always had a career in comedy in the back of my mind. I’m insanely lucky to have a career now that perfectly combines my two passions: videos and comedy. (My third passion is burritos.)

I’m grateful for the U for giving me the opportunity to spend countless hours editing in that one tiny room behind the film classroom. My dream is to Shonda Rhimes my way to the top and buy the U a second, even tinier editing room.”

Ana Breton, alumna and digital producer at “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee”

“I most admire Reid’s guts and perseverance, trying to make it big in Hollywood when the odds are one in a thousand and every audition carries the overwhelming probability of rejection. I also admire his courage singing before millions of people on national television.The whole family tried out for parts in a summer play, Fiddler on the Roof. Reid made it look so easy. I struggled with my little part as the constable.”

— Reid Ewing, chair of City and Metropolitan Planning in the College of Architecture

“My dad is a professor at the U and I think that must be a great job. If I were one and that was my calling, then I would put everything I had into my job like my he does. Although my dad has had a lot of success in his field, what matters more to me is having a family member I care about. We have had a lot of goods times together.”

— Reid E Ewing, actor (Modern Family 2009-2015) and U student majoring in English

“I moved to Utah from Somalia in 1994 after my 2-year-old son and many other family members died amid the civil war.

In 1990 I graduated from Somali National University with a law degree. We had a very beautiful life — we owned an import/export business, we owned a home.

But as soon as I graduated the civil war broke out so I wasn’t able to practice. We had to flee our home due to heavy artillery fire. For the next two years, my family and I were in hiding, moving from place to place in the city. I was just surviving, trying to get food to feed my wife and two sons. We fled to a relative’s home on the outskirts of the city, joining more than 100 family members in that house.

There was no government and all the infrastructure was destroyed. Soon the whole country became chaos and everyone was killing each other and the only way to save ourselves was to leave the country. I risked my life, taking a week or so, to travel by road to Kenya and then Nairobi. I paid a pilot to transport my wife and surviving infant son from Somalia to Nairobi.

We were the first Somalian family to settle in Utah. It was a cultural shock — the weather, the food, there was no place to worship. It was very challenging. But it didn’t matter because we knew we were in a safe place and could start a new life.”

Aden Batar, director of immigration and refugee resettlement for Catholic Community Services of Utah, MPA graduate ‘15

Continue reading

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Save the date: Campus Store Grad Fair March 30-April 1
Personalized graduation announcements
Student Media now accepting applications
U Model European Union Club wins top awards
Excellence in Global Education award
Fall textbook adoption requests due
New online program: Earn your MSIS from anywhere
Migration of student email accounts to 0365 began Feb. 1
Red Butte Garden’s Bulbs and Blooms
Alta call for nominations
LEAP program director search
Second annual Clean Air for U: A Travelwise Challenge


STUDENT MEDIA NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS


Student Media at the University of Utah has two primary missions: First, to engage, provoke, inspire and connect campus by telling the compelling stories of the University of Utah community; and second, to provide a hands-on experiential learning environment in media where students can put into practice skills and ideas from the classroom.

The council oversees a student fee which helps support the Student Media department, and runs the Chronicle, K-UTE, Wasatch Magazine, thegeekwave.com, AdThing and other student driven media and journalism initiatives. By becoming a member of the Student Media Council, students and faculty can play an active role in helping administer this student fee. Student voices in particular are also vital in helping establish how Student Media grows and develops and best serves the campus community. The council is currently looking to fill three vacant student positions and one at-large faculty position.

Applications and more information can be found here.

Deadline is March 31, 2017, by 5 p.m.


SAVE THE DATE: CAMPUS STORE GRAD FAIR MARCH 30-APRIL 1

The one-stop shop for all your graduation needs.

The Class of 2017 Grad Fair takes place March 30 through April 1 at the University Campus Store. If you are planning to walk in this year’s commencement ceremonies, now is the time to order your cap and gown, college regalia, graduation announcements and diploma frames. Cross these must-do items off your list so you can focus on completing your coursework and planning your post-graduation celebrations.

2017 Grad Fair schedule:

  • Thursday, March 30: 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
  • Friday, March 31: 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 1: 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Pre-order your regalia online from the Campus Store now and skip the lines at the Grad Fair. And, last but not least, make sure to sign the Block U before you leave.


Personalized Graduation Announcements

You’ve worked hard, Class of 2017.

Share the great news with friends and family with budget-friendly graduation announcements from University Print & Mail Services. Print & Mail will host a photo booth where you, your friends and family can snap photos using fun grad props against a U of U-themed background. Explore graduation announcement options with Print & Mail staff who can also help you arrange professional photo shoots for announcements or personal use.

This year’s Grad Fair will take place March 30, 31 and April 1 at the University Campus Store.

A number of sizes and styles are available, from traditional folded cards to modern, flat announcements. View the gallery and place your order online or stop by the Print & Mail table at Grad Fair to view styles and paper options. Orders are typically ready for pickup five business days after your order is placed, no shipping fees or delays.

Let us help you celebrate this once-in-a-lifetime achievement. You’ve earned it.


U MODEL EUROPEAN UNION CLUB WINS TOP AWARDS

Please join us in congratulating the University of Utah’s undergraduate Model European Union Club (UMEUC) for taking top awards this year at the West Coast Model EU competition.

The competition, which this year took place Feb. 10-11 in Seattle, is sponsored by the European Union and hosted by the University of Washington’s Center for West European Studies. It brings together teams from the Pac-12 and universities across the U.S. and Canada, including Brigham Young University, University of Wisconsin, Claremont Colleges, University of British Columbia and University of Victoria.

The U’s team consisted of six students, representing the heads of government and ministers of finance of Finland, Lithuania and the Czech Republic.

Anthony Calacino (political science) and Maite Carranaza (business) won outstanding head of government and finance minister awards after successfully negotiating the ‘Brexit’ of the United Kingdom and the European Union’s fiscal capacity.

Anna Passman (economics) won the prize for best position paper and an honorable mention for her performance as Finland’s finance minister, guaranteeing the U more ‘gold medals’ than any other universities.

Other team members were Jack Brown (business), Bas Coebergh (geography) and Christian Sonderegger (political science).


EXCELLENCE IN GLOBAL EDUCATION AWARD
Deadline: March 6, 2017

The Office for Global Engagement (OGE) has established this award to recognize faculty and staff contributions to the university’s global dimension and those who have demonstrated excellence in facilitating student global learning and intercultural understanding. This may include international partnership development that engages students, curriculum revision to include global learning outcomes, advancement of the learning of languages, and other initiatives that provide significant opportunities for global learning either on campus or abroad. It may also include providing exceptional support or mentoring to international students and students participating in learning abroad programs. One faculty member and one staff member will be awarded (two awards).

This is an annual award for which OGE seeks nominations each spring semester. The award selection and ceremony is held in early April each year

For more information, click here.


Fall textbook adoption requests due

U faculty, submit your textbook adoptions to the University Campus Store for the upcoming 2017 summer or fall semesters, it’s not too late. Submitting adoptions is easy — simply complete the University Campus Store’s online textbook adoption form for a quick adoption. If you need assistance in submitting your textbook information, please contact Dave Nelson at 801-581-8321 or dnelson@campusstore.utah.edu.

The prompt submission of textbook adoptions by faculty each semester enables the Campus Store to stock the necessary books in a timely manner. This increases the chances of offering used textbooks, eBooks, and rental textbooks, all of which help students save up to 50 percent off of new book prices. The Campus Store relies heavily on your timely response, so please don’t delay.

Final textbook adoptions for Fall 2017 Semester is due March 31.

Thank you for your ongoing support of the Campus Store’s textbook adoption program, best wishes for another great academic year.


New online program: Earn your MSIS from anywhere

The David Eccles School of Business is introducing a new online degree program, the Master of Science in Information Systems (MSIS). The constantly evolving field of information systems and the online format both further the school’s value of innovation.

Students in the MSIS Online receive the same high level of instruction as students in the on-campus program, including shared faculty and curriculum. Online students can complete the program from any location, and provides flexibility for students who have heavy travel commitments or rotating professional schedules. Additionally, students can choose to enroll in classes full time or part time.

To learn more, click here.


RED BUTTE GARDEN’S BULBS AND BLOOMS

Since 2013, Red Butte Garden has been recognized as an Official Daffodil Display Garden by the American Daffodil Society.

Visit the garden this spring to see 450,000 blooming bulbs. Of those, 230,000 are daffodils (Narcissus). Other bulbs include Allium, Camasia, Cyclamen, Eremurus, Galanthus, Hyacinthus, Iris, Lycoris and more.

All bulbs don’t bloom at the same time.

Different varieties peak at different times, so be sure to visit often to see all that will be blooming this spring. For more information, go here.


ALTA CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Celebrate sustainability leadership on campus by nominating yourself or a colleague for an Alta Sustainability Leadership Award. These Awards recognize excellence in leadership in the areas of campus as a living lab, community partnership, sustainability education, and research. Thanks to the generous partnership of the Alta Ski Resort, an award of $2500 will be given to each recipient. All students, faculty, and staff eligible to participate.

Submit the nomination form by Feb. 28, 2017.


LEAP PROGRAM DIRECTOR SEARCH


LEAP (Learning, Engagement, Achievement, Progress) is in search of a new director.

A key objective of the University of Utah is to expand existing and create new learning communities (LC) to increase retention and completion. The Office of Undergraduate Studies (UGS) is responsible for activating this and other objectives related to student success. The primary role the director of the LEAP Program plays is leadership of the LEAP faculty and peer mentors who support 700-750 students annually. The director keeps vital the vision and mission for LEAP and learning communities as a core element in the Utah Pledge, and the University of Utah’s guarantee that every first-year student can choose a LC that matches their interests and goals. As a member of the core UGS leadership team, the director is part of new initiatives supporting student success and establishes and helps grow partnerships across campus.

The LEAP Learning Community is a year-long learning community that enables new students to transition more confidently to college and to play an active role in their own education. Students stay with the same classmates and faculty member, while taking courses that satisfy general education and graduation requirements, in small classes throughout the year. LEAP students participate in social and service activities with other students and with Peer Advisors.

To see a list of all responsibilities of LEAP Program director, click here.

Qualifications

Required qualifications include a Ph.D. and an outstanding record in teaching at the college and university level. Position is open to tenure/tenure track and career line faculty. Administrative and assessment experience preferred.

How to apply

Please send a cover letter and CV to Andrea Haag (a.haag@ugs.utah.edu). The search committee will begin reviewing files Feb. 27, 2017. Please send questions about the position to Ann Darling (ann.darling@utah.edu), chair of the search committee.

For more information, visit the LEAP director search page.


SECOND ANNUAL CLEAN AIR FOR U: A TRAVELWISE CHALLENGE
Month of February
Track your trips at tinyurl.com/Ucleanair

Drive less to help clean the air. Walk, bike, take TRAX, ride buses and shuttles — do whatever you can to not drive alone. Then, log those trips at tinyurl.com/Ucleanair throughout February to see your contribution to better air.

Mobile sources, including personal vehicles, are responsible for nearly half of all winter PM 2.5-related emissions that contribute to the unhealthy air. Together, we can make a difference.

Read more here.


 

MIGRATION OF STUDENT UMAIL ACCOUNTS TO 0365 BEGAN FEB. 1

Starting Feb. 1, 2017, University Information Technology (UIT) began the gradual migration of 27,000 student UMail accounts from on-campus hardware and software to Exchange Online, a cloud-hosted messaging application that’s part of Microsoft Office 365, or O365.

“The move to Office 365 is in keeping with the university’s strategy to transition to cloud-based services when there are improved services for students combined with less risk and cost for the institution,” said Chief Information Officer Steve Hess. “It will help better align us with Pac-12 and other peer institutions that have already successfully made this move.”

The phased plan will take place over the course of several months, starting with inactive accounts, but eventually encompassing all students with a non-employee role at the university.

Emails informing students of the change will be sent in batches, alerting users that their accounts may be moved as soon as 24 hours after receipt of the email. In addition, the emails outline the new login process and detail user interface changes to post-login screens.

Read the full story here.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Save the date: Campus Store Grad Fair March 30-April 1
Personalized graduation announcements
Student Media now accepting applications
U Model European Union Club wins top awards
Excellence in Global Education award
Fall textbook adoption requests due
New online program: Earn your MSIS from anywhere
Red Butte Garden’s Bulbs and Blooms
Alta call for nominations
LEAP program director search
Second annual Clean Air for U: A Travelwise Challenge


STUDENT MEDIA NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS


Student Media at the University of Utah has two primary missions: First, to engage, provoke, inspire and connect campus by telling the compelling stories of the University of Utah community; and second, to provide a hands-on experiential learning environment in media where students can put into practice skills and ideas from the classroom.

The council oversees a student fee which helps support the Student Media department, and runs the Chronicle, K-UTE, Wasatch Magazine, thegeekwave.com, AdThing and other student driven media and journalism initiatives. By becoming a member of the Student Media Council, students and faculty can play an active role in helping administer this student fee. Student voices in particular are also vital in helping establish how Student Media grows and develops and best serves the campus community. The council is currently looking to fill three vacant student positions and one at-large faculty position.

Applications and more information can be found here.

Deadline is March 31, 2017, by 5 p.m.


SAVE THE DATE: CAMPUS STORE GRAD FAIR MARCH 30-APRIL 1

The one-stop shop for all your graduation needs.

The Class of 2017 Grad Fair takes place March 30 through April 1 at the University Campus Store. If you are planning to walk in this year’s commencement ceremonies, now is the time to order your cap and gown, college regalia, graduation announcements and diploma frames. Cross these must-do items off your list so you can focus on completing your coursework and planning your post-graduation celebrations.

2017 Grad Fair schedule:

  • Thursday, March 30:  7:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
  • Friday, March 31:  7:30 a.m.-6 p.m.
  • Saturday, April 1:  11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Pre-order your regalia online from the Campus Store now and skip the lines at the Grad Fair. And, last but not least, make sure to sign the Block U before you leave.


Personalized Graduation Announcements

You’ve worked hard, Class of 2017.

Share the great news with friends and family with budget-friendly graduation announcements from University Print & Mail Services. Print & Mail will host a photo booth where you, your friends and family can snap photos using fun grad props against a U of U-themed background. Explore graduation announcement options with Print & Mail staff who can also help you arrange professional photo shoots for announcements or personal use.

This year’s Grad Fair will take place March 30, 31 and April 1 at the University Campus Store.

A number of sizes and styles are available, from traditional folded cards to modern, flat announcements. View the gallery and place your order online or stop by the Print & Mail table at Grad Fair to view styles and paper options. Orders are typically ready for pickup five business days after your order is placed, no shipping fees or delays.

Let us help you celebrate this once-in-a-lifetime achievement. You’ve earned it.


U MODEL EUROPEAN UNION CLUB WINS TOP AWARDS

Please join us in congratulating the University of Utah’s undergraduate Model European Union Club (UMEUC) for taking top awards this year at the West Coast Model EU competition.

The competition, which this year took place Feb. 10-11 in Seattle, is sponsored by the European Union and hosted by the University of Washington’s Center for West European Studies. It brings together teams from the Pac-12 and universities across the U.S. and Canada, including Brigham Young University, University of Wisconsin, Claremont Colleges, University of British Columbia and University of Victoria.

The U’s team consisted of six students, representing the heads of government and ministers of finance of Finland, Lithuania and the Czech Republic.

Anthony Calacino (political science) and Maite Carranaza (business) won outstanding head of government and finance minister awards after successfully negotiating the ‘Brexit’ of the United Kingdom and the European Union’s fiscal capacity.

Anna Passman (economics) won the prize for best position paper and an honorable mention for her performance as Finland’s finance minister, guaranteeing the U more ‘gold medals’ than any other universities.

Other team members were Jack Brown (business), Bas Coebergh (geography) and Christian Sonderegger (political science).


EXCELLENCE IN GLOBAL EDUCATION AWARD
Deadline: March 6, 2017

The Office for Global Engagement (OGE) has established this award to recognize faculty and staff contributions to the university’s global dimension and those who have demonstrated excellence in facilitating student global learning and intercultural understanding. This may include international partnership development that engages students, curriculum revision to include global learning outcomes, advancement of the learning of languages, and other initiatives that provide significant opportunities for global learning either on campus or abroad. It may also include providing exceptional support or mentoring to international students and students participating in learning abroad programs. One faculty member and one staff member will be awarded (two awards).

This is an annual award for which OGE seeks nominations each spring semester. The award selection and ceremony is held in early April each year

For more information, click here.


Fall textbook adoption requests due

U faculty, submit your textbook adoptions to the University Campus Store for the upcoming 2017 summer or fall semesters, it’s not too late. Submitting adoptions is easy — simply complete the University Campus Store’s online textbook adoption form for a quick adoption. If you need assistance in submitting your textbook information, please contact Dave Nelson at 801-581-8321 or dnelson@campusstore.utah.edu.

The prompt submission of textbook adoptions by faculty each semester enables the Campus Store to stock the necessary books in a timely manner. This increases the chances of offering used textbooks, eBooks, and rental textbooks, all of which help students save up to 50 percent off of new book prices. The Campus Store relies heavily on your timely response, so please don’t delay.

Final textbook adoptions for Fall 2017 Semester is due March 31.

Thank you for your ongoing support of the Campus Store’s textbook adoption program, best wishes for another great academic year.


New online program: Earn your MSIS from anywhere

The David Eccles School of Business is introducing a new online degree program, the Master of Science in Information Systems (MSIS).  The constantly evolving field of information systems and the online format both further the school’s value of innovation.

Students in the MSIS Online receive the same high level of instruction as students in the on-campus program, including shared faculty and curriculum. Online students can complete the program from any location, and provides flexibility for students who have heavy travel commitments or rotating professional schedules. Additionally, students can choose to enroll in classes full time or part time.

To learn more, click here.


RED BUTTE GARDEN’S BULBS AND BLOOMS

Since 2013, Red Butte Garden has been recognized as an Official Daffodil Display Garden by the American Daffodil Society.

Visit the garden this spring to see 450,000 blooming bulbs. Of those, 230,000 are daffodils (Narcissus). Other bulbs include Allium, Camasia, Cyclamen, Eremurus, Galanthus, Hyacinthus, Iris, Lycoris and more.

All bulbs don’t bloom at the same time.

Different varieties peak at different times, so be sure to visit often to see all that will be blooming this spring. For more information, go here.


ALTA CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Celebrate sustainability leadership on campus by nominating yourself or a colleague for an Alta Sustainability Leadership Award. These Awards recognize excellence in leadership in the areas of campus as a living lab, community partnership, sustainability education, and research. Thanks to the generous partnership of the Alta Ski Resort, an award of $2500 will be given to each recipient. All students, faculty, and staff eligible to participate.

Submit the nomination form by Feb. 28, 2017.


LEAP PROGRAM DIRECTOR SEARCH


LEAP (Learning, Engagement, Achievement, Progress) is in search of a new director.

A key objective of the University of Utah is to expand existing and create new learning communities (LC) to increase retention and completion. The Office of Undergraduate Studies (UGS) is responsible for activating this and other objectives related to student success. The primary role the director of the LEAP Program plays is leadership of the LEAP faculty and peer mentors who support 700-750 students annually. The director keeps vital the vision and mission for LEAP and learning communities as a core element in the Utah Pledge, and the University of Utah’s guarantee that every first-year student can choose a LC that matches their interests and goals. As a member of the core UGS leadership team, the director is part of new initiatives supporting student success and establishes and helps grow partnerships across campus.

The LEAP Learning Community is a year-long learning community that enables new students to transition more confidently to college and to play an active role in their own education. Students stay with the same classmates and faculty member, while taking courses that satisfy general education and graduation requirements, in small classes throughout the year. LEAP students participate in social and service activities with other students and with Peer Advisors.

To see a list of all responsibilities of LEAP Program director, click here.

Qualifications

Required qualifications include a Ph.D. and an outstanding record in teaching at the college and university level.  Position is open to tenure/tenure track and career line faculty. Administrative and assessment experience preferred.

How to apply

Please send a cover letter and CV to Andrea Haag (a.haag@ugs.utah.edu). The search committee will begin reviewing files Feb. 27, 2017. Please send questions about the position to Ann Darling (ann.darling@utah.edu), chair of the search committee.

For more information, visit the LEAP director search page.


SECOND ANNUAL CLEAN AIR FOR U: A TRAVELWISE CHALLENGE
Month of February
Track your trips at tinyurl.com/Ucleanair

Drive less to help clean the air. Walk, bike, take TRAX, ride buses and shuttles — do whatever you can to not drive alone. Then, log those trips at tinyurl.com/Ucleanair throughout February to see your contribution to better air.

Mobile sources, including personal vehicles, are responsible for nearly half of all winter PM 2.5-related emissions that contribute to the unhealthy air. Together, we can make a difference.

Read more here.