Department of Anthropology

A close up of quaking aspen trees.

Indigenous land-use reduced catastrophic wildfires on the Fish Lake Plateau

U researchers found that 1,000 years ago, the Fremont used cultural burning to reduce the risk for large-scale wildfire activity in mountain environments.


A reversal of Earth’s geomagnetic field

Approximately 42,000 years ago the Earth’s geomagnetic field reversed, triggering dramatic climate shifts and fueling ecological change on a global scale.


Experiences south of the border

Hands-on learning in Mexico.


Restorative justice preferred among the Enga

Advocates have called for a restorative justice system that repairs harm done to victims and reintegrates wrongdoers into society. The Enga of Papua New Guinea balance retribution and restitution.


Silencing the booming chorus

From 2007 to 2009, a yellow fever virus outbreak nearly decimated El Parque El Piñalito’s howler monkey populations. Exposure to a past virus may have aided brown howlers’ survival.


Earliest interbreeding event between ancient human populations discovered

The new study goes back further than 23andme could have ever imagined.


University statement on former professor Henry Harpending

Henry Harpending was a professor of anthropology from 1997 until his death in 2016.


Ecosystems of early human evolution

To understand the environmental pressures that shaped human evolution, scientists must first piece together the details of the ancient plant and animal communities that our fossil ancestors lived in over the past 7 million years.


Mesoamerica comes to the U

Maya experts from around the world will convene at the U for the Mesoamerican Conference that focuses on preclassic Maya history between 2000 B.C. and 250 A.D.


POPULATION PATTERNS

Agricultural productivity drove Euro-American settlement of Utah, explaining past and present population patterns.