PACIFIC ISLANDER INITIATIVE

By Estela Hernandez, public relations and events specialist, University of Utah Office for Equity and Diversity and Annalisa Purser, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

The University of Utah recently announced its intent to build the top Pacific Islander program in the continental United States. As part of the initiative, the U is in the process of hiring two new full-time faculty in Pacific Islander studies and recently created a new scholarship aimed at recruiting and retaining talented Pacific Islander students.

pacific-islander-program-2Utah has one of the oldest and largest Pacific Islander communities in the U.S. In fact, Utah has the largest number of Pacific Islanders in the continental U.S. per-capita, and U.S. Census figures show the population increased by more than 60 percent between 2000 and 2010. Pacific Islanders have lived continuously in Utah since 1870.

“Because of Utah’s long history with Pacific Islanders and the strong network of professionals, community groups and associations within the Pacific Islander community, the U is well positioned to strengthen these partnerships and build the top program in the continental United States,” said Adrian Viliami Bell, assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology and co-director of the Pacific Islander studies initiative at the U.

Despite their strong presence in the state, Pacific Islanders make up one of the smallest proportions of the U’s full-time students. This does not reflect the trends seen at the high school level. Pacific Islander high school students are graduating at rates equal to that of other racial/ethnic groups in Utah. Additionally, of all the high school conferences the U’s hosts, the one for Pacific Islander high school students is the most well attended, with nearly 700 participants in 2016.

“This work is long overdue,” Bell said. “Pacific Islanders are an important part of our state and have a variety of skills, knowledge and experience to share. We want to work more closely with them, and we want students to have a place on campus and to bring their perspectives to all disciplines offered here.”

Earlier this year, a group of Pacific Islander faculty and staff from across campus came together in an effort to bring more attention to Pacific Islander studies and advocate for more Pacific Islander faculty. The group connected with leaders from the Utah Pacific Islander Health Coalition, the National Tongan American Society and other groups and organized the U’s first Pacific Islander Symposium.

The symposium was held Nov. 11 and featured Kalani Raphael, a Hawaiian nephrologist and associate professor at the U, and keynote speaker Nia Aitaoto, co-director of the Center for Pacific Islander Health at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, northwest campus. The symposium celebrated the launch of the Pacific Islander initiative and provided an opportunity for the U’s Pacific Islander Faculty and Staff Coalition to gather feedback from the community and key stakeholders about the design, implementation and community involvement with upcoming phases.

“Pacific Islanders have been an integral part of Utah’s sociohistory, but not much is acknowledged in terms of our substantial, ongoing contributions to the state,” said Jake Fitisemanu, Jr., associate instructor in Ethnic Studies and member of the coalition. “The U’s Pacific Islander studies initiative is an exciting first step in expanding this knowledge base on campus and throughout the community as a whole.”

The initiative will take a three-pronged approach: Collaborating and serving the state’s Pacific Islander community, increasing the diversity of the university’s faculty by hiring scholars whose expertise lies in the area of Pacific Islander studies and providing scholarships and mentorship opportunities to students of Pacific Islander backgrounds.

“We are fortunate to have a large and dynamic community of Pacific Islanders in Utah who are interested in working with the university,” said Matt Basso, associate professor in gender studies and history and co-director of the Pacific Islander studies initiative. “We want this program to be defined by a collaborative and reciprocal relationship with the local Pacific Islander community and driven by their desires.”

Current Pacific Islander research at the U spans across campus, focusing on health, education, linguistics, cultural studies, social work and more. One of the two new Pacific Islander studies faculty positions will be in the U’s School for Cultural and Social Transformation, which opened this fall and is the first school in the Intermountain West to focus on the intersection of race, gender and social justice. The other hire will be in the Department of History. Both positions are currently open, and the community is invited to participate in the hiring process by attending the candidates’ research presentations at the beginning of 2018. Information will be available here.

To learn more about the initiative or to donate to the Pacific Islander scholarship, contact pacificislander@utah.edu.

HUMANS OF THE U

“I was really attracted to zooarchaeology because it’s almost like a puzzle you know, like a mystery. We have this material record, but we have to try to find other clues to figure out what happened, why we see what we see.”

“I’m working with bird remains from a site called Homestead Cave. Owls have been living in that cave for 13,000 years…they would roost in there and throw up their pellets…So it’s a really fine grained record of [the birds] that these owls were eating, which in turn tells us what kind of things were living in that area for the past 13,000 years.”

“I think it’s neat that I can not only look at a record of birds that lived thousands of years ago and figure out what they are, but I can use that information to help conserve species that we see today.”

“Because we know what the environment was doing around that time, I can look at the bird record and see how that changed in relation to those things, and then apply that information to modern bird conservation.”

— Allison Wolfe, Anthropology graduate student in the University of Utah Zooarchaeology Laboratory

“I just got to speak to my biological father for the first time. I spent a lot of time fighting depression and feeling angry, abandoned and confused since I didn’t know much about him or why he left. My mom never told me much. I learned about true forgiveness at a church camp I went to and found peace with that lesson. I also found comfort in rap and hip-hop. From Wu-Tang to Kendrick, I felt connected by the music and the idea that there could be 100,000 people vibing to the same track I’m listening to and just feeling the energy of hip-hop. Without learning to forgive; without the soul that fires up in me through hip-hop; and without learning how to unconditionally love myself, the world and others, I would’ve ended myself a while ago. It turns out my father is 100 percent English, and I have three blood siblings, which hit me like a truck because I grew up a single child. He wants to visit from northern Illinois sometime soon, which I’m down for.”

— Noah Hughes, U student

“In 1986 my father passed away and left me his restaurant, the Rocky Mountain. I was still attending the U studying communication and art, so thankfully I had a great management staff to help me out. After I graduated in 1989, I started my own private security firm and still took care of the restaurant. As a favor, I opened a café in the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts and Education Building and ended up loving it. I thoroughly enjoy interacting with the students and providing them with a great meal at a cheap price. Four months ago, I sold the Rocky Mountain Grill, but decided to keep the café because I love it so much.”

— Bill Gomez, U staff

“After I finished my military service, I was kind of in the middle of nowhere. I didn’t know where to go, where to start again. I felt like I can’t speak English very well anymore, so I was really kind of afraid.

In my family it was all about numbers and money all the time. My father was an engineer and my brother is a stockbroker, so they never understood what I was trying to do. When I first told them that I wanted to do social work, they were disappointed in me.

But my family started to get curious about what I was studying. They see I learn how to respect individuals and how individuals are important to our society. They now are supportive, calling and asking how school is doing. Every time I feel like I’m down or am sad, I read what my dad wrote to me: ‘One gets seasick from looking at what is right in front of him. Look hundreds of kilometers ahead. There, it is calm like the gentle waves. Therefore, as I watch it now here today and because of that reason, I do not worry at all.”

— Hyeonwoo Jacob Lee, social work student at the Utah Asia Campus

Continue reading

PAUSE FOR PAWS

By Jennifer Nozawa, public relations specialist, College of Social Work

There is tension in the air… and it’s not all related to politics.  As we inch our way closer and closer to the end of the semester, our campus community is also dealing with the usual stress of final exams, big presentations, group projects, lengthy papers and looming due dates.  So… THERAPY DOGS!  (Need we say more?)

img_8613cropThis semester the College of Social Work is bringing the campus a slightly-earlier-than-usual opportunity to “Pause for Paws”—the paws of visiting therapy dogs.  Registered teams from Therapy Animals of Utah will be in the College of Social Work’s atrium on Wednesday, Nov. 30, and Friday, Dec. 2 11 a.m.-1 p.m.  Students, faculty and staff from across campus are invited to take a short break from their stress by visiting with these talented volunteer teams.

Interaction with dogs, cats and other animals can help reduce a person’s heart rate, blood pressure, anxiety and stress levels.  Anecdotally, many people already know this.  But there’s also plenty of research that backs it up and indicates that animal-assisted therapy (AAT)—the service provided by Therapy Animals of Utah’s animal-handler teams—can do even more.

In 2007, then-Master of Social Work student Janelle Nimer and associate professor of social work Brad Lundahl conducted the first comprehensive meta-analysis of AAT research.  Their study (published in the journal Anthrozoös) found consistent evidence that AAT could help people improve their emotional well-being, as well as help with Autism spectrum symptoms, medical difficulties and behavioral issues.  Since then, an increasing number of medical, mental health and other human service professionals around the world have paired established therapeutic interventions with AAT in an effort to improve client outcomes.  In fact, Nimer now teaches a master’s-level social work class that helps social work students learn ways to incorporate AAT into therapeutic practice with a variety of clients.

Since Paws for Paws was introduced in 2013, the biannual event has become a favorite of many students.  During previous Pause for Paws events, students have reported that just a couple minutes with the therapy dogs (and occasionally a therapy cat) melts away the stress of finals, puts a smile on their faces and reenergizes them to tackle the rest of the semester.

A TRADITION OF KINDNESS

By Jana Cunningham, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

With the holiday season approaching, it’s a good time to teach children how to establish a tradition of doing small acts of kindness. Susan Johnston, professor of special education at the U, created a book to do just that. “The Gnome in Your Home – A Tradition of Kindness” is an illustrated children’s book and plush toy inspired by Johnston’s own family’s experiences as well as her professional work.

gnomeopenbook“In my personal life, instead of feeling helpless when hearing about acts of violence in the world, I decided to start a tradition of doing kind acts for others,” said Johnston. “In addition to spreading kindness, my family found that our positive feelings increased and it reduced our stress. Further, I was completely surprised by how much my son enjoyed the process and doing acts of kindness.”

The rhyming children’s book features a group of gnomes who, due to their small size and lack of magical skills, question if they can make a difference. As the story progresses, the gnomes discover they have a valuable gift—a gift for kindness. Based on this discovery and the realization that small acts of kindness can change the world, the gnomes make a plan to visit homes in order to teach children (and adults) how easy and fun it is to develop a tradition of daily acts of kindness.

“In my professional life, I focus on developing and implementing evidence based practices that make a difference in the areas of positive behaviors, communication and social interaction. Concerns regarding instances of violence and bullying in schools made me want to develop a fun and interactive way to develop young children’s skills related to kindness and positive behaviors,” added Johnston.

In addition to the story, the book contains four removable pages filled with acts of kindness cards. Each card contains an idea for an act of kindness. There are also several blank cards, so families can create their own.

A plush gnome accompanies each book. Each evening, caregivers or parents simply choose an act of kindness card and place it in the gnome’s lap. When the gnome is discovered in the morning, families can plan and discuss that day’s act of kindness.

Johnston’s book and personal experiences are supported by research on kindness. Specifically, researchers have found that kindness breeds more kindness, kindness reduces stress, kindness can be taught, being kind can make kids more accepting of others and socially accepted themselves and performing acts of kindness can increase a child’s happiness.

“Kindness, he said,
may be a small act.
But it can change the world,
and that is a fact” (The Gnome in Your Home)

‘TOXIC FAT’

By Julie Kiefer, manager, Science Communications, University of Utah Health Sciences Public Affairs

For years, scientists have known that someone who is thin could still end up with diabetes. Yet an obese person may be surprisingly healthy.

Now, new research led by scientists at the University of Utah College of Health, and carried out with an international team of scientsts, points to an answer to that riddle: accumulation of a toxic class of fat metabolites, known as ceramides, may make people more prone to type 2 diabetes.

Among patients in Singapore receiving gastric bypass surgery, ceramide levels predicted who had diabetes better than obesity did. Even though all of the patients were obese, those who did not have type 2 diabetes had less ceramide in their adipose tissue than those who were diagnosed with the condition.

Scott Summers, Department of Nutrition and Integrative Physiology, University of Utah College of Health.

PHOTO CREDIT: University of Utah Health Sciences

Scott Summers, Department of Nutrition and Integrative Physiology, University of Utah College of Health.

“Ceramides impact the way the body handles nutrients,” says the study’s senior author Scott Summers, Ph.D., also chairman of the University of Utah Department of Nutrition and Integrative Physiology. “They impair the way the body responds to insulin, and also how it burns calories.”

In the study, published on Nov. 3 in Cell Metabolism online, the researchers also show that a buildup of ceramides prevents the normal function of fat (adipose) tissue in mice.

When people overeat, they produce an excess of fatty acids. Those can be stored in the body as triglycerides or burned for energy. However in some people, fatty acids are turned into ceramides.

“It’s like a tipping point,” Summers said.

At that point, when ceramides accrue, the adipose tissue stops working appropriately, and fat spills out into the vasculature or heart and does damage to other peripheral tissues. Until now, scientists didn’t know how ceramides were damaging the body.

The three-year project found that adding excess ceramides to human fat cells  or mice caused them to become unresponsive to insulin and develop impairments in their ability to burn calories. The mice were also more suceptible to diabetes, as well as fatty liver disease.

Conversely, they also found that mice with fewer ceramides in their adipose tissue were less susceptible to insulin resistance, a first sign of diabetes.  Using genetic engineering, researchers had deleted the gene that converts saturated fats into ceramides.

The findings indicate that high ceramides levels may increase diabetes risk and low levels could protect against the disease.

The scientists think this could mean that some people are more likely to convert calories into ceramides than others. “That suggests some skinny people will get diabetes or fatty liver disease if something such as genetics triggers ceramide accumulation,” said Bhagirath Chaurasia, Ph.D., assistant professor at the University of Utah and the lead author of the study.

As a result of the new research, the scientists are now searching for genetic mutations that lead to people’s predisposition to accumulating ceramides, developing obesity and type 2 diabetes.

Summers notes that some Asian countries have a higher diabetes rate than the United States even though the obesity rate is relatively low. “Some people are just not made to deal with dietary fat,” says Summers. “It’s not just how much you eat, because some people can eat a lot and they just store all the fat effectively and remain healthy.”

Adipose tissue exists as three types. White adipose tissue is considered the “bad” kind, because it predominately stores fat. Brown adipose tissue burns fat to generate heat. Beige adipose tissue is a variety of white fat that can change to brown when the body needs to produce heat or create energy.

Based on their research, the scientists propose that as ceramides build up, the tissue loses the characteristics of brown fat, effectively becoming more white. This sets off a  sequence of events that can lead to disease.

Summers previously published research in 2007 proving that the inhibition of ceramide synthesis in rodents prevented the development of fatty liver disease and diabetes. He is now working to develop drugs to target that issue.

“By blocking ceramide production, we might be able to prevent the development of type 2 diabetes or other metabolic conditions, at least in some people,” Chaurasia said. Knowing how problematic ceramide accumulation is inside adipose tissue will help researchers focus on that specific problem.

Citation: Adipocyte Ceramides Regulate Subcutaneous Adipose Browning, Inflammation, and Metabolism; Cell Metabolism online Nov. 3, 2016

Funding: National Medical Research Council, Singapore; Victorian State Government OIS scheme, Australia; University of Utah Diabetes and Metabolism Center; University of Utah College of Health.

Collaboratoring Institutions: University of Utah College of Health; Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Australia; Singapore Bioimaging Consortium; Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore; National University of Singapore; Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, India; University of Brunei Darussalam; Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine; University of Michigan; RIKEN Brain Science Institute, Japan.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Apply for staff scholarships today
Massage therapy expands hours to Saturday and Sunday
Give the gift of wellness: Campus Recreation Services gift certificates now on sale
Personal training sessions at the Student Life Center

Utah teen emotions study
Customized holiday gifts by University Print & Mail

U holiday cards
University Teaching Committee awards
Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway presented by America First Credit Union


APPLY FOR STAFF SCHOLARSHIPS TODAY

staff-scholarships
Applications are now being accepted for staff development scholarships for the Spring 2017 semester. Each scholarship is worth up to $500 and can be used towards the employee’s tuition bill. Scholarships can be used toward professional trainings, symposiums, conferences or workshops and their associated expenses.

The committee will process the scholarship applications in the most fair and judicious manner to benefit the employee, according to the procedures directed by the University of Utah policy. UUSC is an equal opportunity provider.

Qualified Applicants must meet the following criteria:

  1. Currently working at 75 percent or above Full Time Equivalency (FTE) position (30-40 hours per week).
  2. Maintained 75 percent or greater Full Time Equivalency (FTE) in a benefits eligible position for two consecutive years as of Dec. 1, 2016.
  3. Have not received a Staff Council scholarship within the past two years.

Current Staff Council Members are not eligible. Click here to apply.

Applications are due by 11:59 p.m. (MST) on Dec. 4, 2016.

Incomplete applications will not be considered.


MASSAGE THERAPY EXPANDS HOURS TO SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

massage-therapy-box
Take a break from finals, holidays, and the impending season change with a 60-minute massage therapy session. Our massage therapist will help you relax, unwind, and re-energize.  60-minutes sessions are only $55 or $45 for students.

Beginning Dec. 3, our massage therapists will also be available on Saturdays from 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and on Sundays from 1:30-5 p.m.

For a list of all the hours, please visit campusrec.utah.edu.  To book your session, please call 801.581.8898.


GIVE THE GIFT OF WELLNESS

gift-certificate-box
Campus Recreation Services gift certificates are now on sale at the Eccles Student Life Center Membership Services desk.

Gift certificates can be used for most things Campus Recreation Services has to offer from Fitness Classes to Outdoor Adventures rentals and trips.  Stop by the Eccles Student Life Center Membership Services desk and check off some early holiday shopping.


PERSONAL TRAINING SESSIONS AT THE STUDENT LIFE CENTER

ptboxf16
Click here for information and registration

Get a jump on your holiday workouts with some Personal Training at the Eccles Student Life Center.  Our certified trainers will work with you to develop the best fitness plan for your goals.

Check out the details and register today.


UTAH TEEN EMOTIONS STUDY

utes%20community%20flyer-1
University of Utah research team is looking for two types of families to participate in a research study at the University of Utah. Your family may be a great fit for the study.

If your teenage daughter is:

  • Between the ages of 13-17
  • Does not have epilepsy, seizures, heart
    disease or asthma
  • Is not taking major tranquilizers,
    antihistamines or beta blockers
  • Fits into one of two groups:
    • Has NO HISTORY of psychological
      problems, like depression, attention
      problems, suicidal behaviors or self injury
    • Has harmed him/herself or attempted
      suicide

For more information or to sign up, contact the University of Utah research team at 801-581-6412 or utah.teen.emotion@gmail.com.


CUSTOMIZED HOLIDAY GIFTS BY UNIVERSITY PRINT & MAIL

1705851-upms_custom-gifts-image
Don’t be alarmed, but the holidays are six weeks away.

If your organization or department is in need of holiday gifts or giveaways, let University Print & Mail help you design and customize one-of-a-kind gifts for those special people on your list this year.

From water bottles to umbrellas, blankets to tote bags—if you can think of it, Print & Mail can create it and make it personal by adding names, text or departmental logos. Most items take approximately five weeks for production and delivery, so order now to ensure your items arrive in time for the holidays. For a custom quote, please call 801- 581-6171 or visit printing.utah.edu for more information.

University Print & Mail is an official licensee of the University of Utah and is therefore legally permitted to use and reproduce university-owned trademarks and logos. By supporting official licensees like Print & Mail, you are assured to receive quality products while also supporting student scholarships, athletic programs and other university initiatives.


U HOLIDAY CARDS

p1100470
Get a head start on the holiday season by ordering your greeting cards from University Print & Mail Services. Conveniently place your order online and choose from more than 20 designs, enhanced by your own personalized message. Orders are typically completed in five business days and can be picked up or delivered to your office for free. Making this annual task even easier, Print & Mail can address your envelopes, apply postage and place your cards in the mail for you.

In addition to holiday card designs, University Print & Mail offers several other styles for fall, along with other special occasion cards such as birthday cards, thank you cards, custom-design cards and personalized stationery.

Both personal and office orders are welcome. To view designs online and place your order, visit printing.utah.edu.


UNIVERSITY TEACHING COMMITTEE AWARDS

University-Teaching-Awards-2016-17
The University Teaching Committee encourages the efforts of faculty members, departments and colleges to improve individual teaching skills, devise effective teaching techniques and recognize and reward superior achievements in teaching. A variety of awards are now seeking nominations.

To see criteria and deadlines, click here.


UTAH RED ZONE FAN CAVE GIVEAWAY PRESENTED BY AMERICA FIRST CREDIT UNION

Fan Cave
Utah Red Zone and America First Credit Union are working together to give one lucky Utah Football fan the best seat in the house with the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway. Utah Red Zone will make one fan’s living room have as much Utah pride as they do with a fully furnished and decorated fan cave for the perfect home and away game experience.

The Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway grand prize includes:

  • Samsung 65″ Class 4K Ultra HD TV
  • (2) Imperial University of Utah Recliners
  • Blakeway framed Rice-Eccles Stadium panorama
  • Northwest Utah tapestry woven blanket
  • Northwest Utah plush throw blanket
  • Northwest Utah rug
  • Legacy Utah vintage game poster artwork
  • Legacy Utah wall-mount bottle opener
  • Legacy Utah serving tray
  • Paulson Designs Utah athletic logo canvas art
  • Authentic Street Signs “Man Cave” sign
  • Dahl large vinyl decal

and more Utah Red Zone merchandise.

Utah fans can enter to win the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway by going to URedZone.com/FanCaveGiveaway. The lucky winner will be randomly selected at the conclusion of the Utah Football season.

For more information, call or visit Utah Red Zone or the University Campus Store.

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Crimson Internship Program application deadline extended
Massage therapy expands hours to Saturday and Sunday
Give the gift of wellness: Campus Recreation Services gift certificates now on sale
Personal training sessions at the Student Life Center
Utah Academic Libraries Consortium open textbooks statewide survey
Customized holiday gifts by University Print & Mail

Apply now for Alternative Spring Break
Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway presented by America First Credit Union


CRIMSON INTERNSHIP PROGRAM APPLICATION
Application deadline extended to Dec. 9, 2016

crimson-internships
The Crimson Internship Program helps current University of Utah students find unique internship experiences to gain the career readiness experiences needed to enter the world of work after graduation. The program connects employers with students from across campus who are seeking the hands on training needed to bridge their academic passions and future career plans. Student program applications are due November 30, 2016.

Check out the website for additional information, a list of participating employers and to submit your application.


MASSAGE THERAPY EXPANDS HOURS TO SATURDAY AND SUNDAY

massage-therapy-box
Take a break from finals, holidays, and the impending season change with a 60-minute massage therapy session. Our massage therapist will help you relax, unwind, and re-energize. 60-minutes sessions are only $55 or $45 for students.

Beginning Dec. 3, our massage therapists will also be available on Saturdays from 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and on Sundays from 1:30-5 p.m.

For a list of all the hours, please visit campusrec.utah.edu. To book your session, please call 801.581.8898.


GIVE THE GIFT OF WELLNESS

gift-certificate-box
Campus Recreation Services gift certificates are now on sale at the Eccles Student Life Center Membership Services desk.

Gift certificates can be used for most things Campus Recreation Services has to offer from Fitness Classes to Outdoor Adventures rentals and trips. Stop by the Eccles Student Life Center Membership Services desk and check off some early holiday shopping.


PERSONAL TRAINING SESSIONS AT THE STUDENT LIFE CENTER

ptboxf16
Click here for information and registration

Get a jump on your holiday workouts with some Personal Training at the Eccles Student Life Center. Our certified trainers will work with you to develop the best fitness plan for your goals.

Check out the details and register today.


UTAH ACADEMIC LIBRARIES CONSORTIUM OPEN TEXTBOOKS STATEWIDE SURVEY
Response deadline is Wednesday, Nov. 30

Free online textbooks are emerging as an alternative to traditional print textbooks. Tell the Utah System of Higher Education what you think about textbooks. Your input will provide valuable information on a statewide pilot project about free online textbooks.

Please complete this survey by Wednesday, Nov. 30. Note that this survey is intended for students on the University of Utah MAIN CAMPUS only.

The survey can be found here.


CUSTOMIZED HOLIDAY GIFTS BY UNIVERSITY PRINT & MAIL

1705851-upms_custom-gifts-image
Don’t be alarmed, but the holidays are six weeks away.

If your organization or department is in need of holiday gifts or giveaways, let University Print & Mail help you design and customize one-of-a-kind gifts for those special people on your list this year.

From water bottles to umbrellas, blankets to tote bags—if you can think of it, Print & Mail can create it and make it personal by adding names, text or departmental logos. Most items take approximately five weeks for production and delivery, so order now to ensure your items arrive in time for the holidays. For a custom quote, please call 801- 581-6171 or visit printing.utah.edu for more information.

University Print & Mail is an official licensee of the University of Utah and is therefore legally permitted to use and reproduce university-owned trademarks and logos. By supporting official licensees like Print & Mail, you are assured to receive quality products while also supporting student scholarships, athletic programs and other university initiatives.


U HOLIDAY CARDS

p1100470
Get a head start on the holiday season by ordering your greeting cards from University Print & Mail Services. Conveniently place your order online and choose from more than 20 designs, enhanced by your own personalized message. Orders are typically completed in five business days and can be picked up or delivered to your office for free. Making this annual task even easier, Print & Mail can address your envelopes, apply postage and place your cards in the mail for you.

In addition to holiday card designs, University Print & Mail offers several other styles for fall, along with other special occasion cards such as birthday cards, thank you cards, custom-design cards and personalized stationery.

Both personal and office orders are welcome. To view designs online and place your order, visit printing.utah.edu.


APPLY NOW FOR ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK

seattle-hl
Apply now to spend spring break volunteering, learning and traveling with the Bennion Center’s Alternative Break program. Eleven different trips are being offered to cities in the western United States and Canada. It’s an immersive, week-long opportunity to learn first-hand about important social and environmental issues. Applications are due Monday, Nov. 28, at 11:59 p.m.

Apply here.


UTAH RED ZONE FAN CAVE GIVEAWAY PRESENTED BY AMERICA FIRST CREDIT UNION

Fan Cave
Utah Red Zone and America First Credit Union are working together to give one lucky Utah Football fan the best seat in the house with the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway. Utah Red Zone will make one fan’s living room have as much Utah pride as they do with a fully furnished and decorated fan cave for the perfect home and away game experience.

The Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway grand prize includes:

  • Samsung 65″ Class 4K Ultra HD TV
  • (2) Imperial University of Utah Recliners
  • Blakeway framed Rice-Eccles stadium panorama
  • Northwest Utah tapestry woven blanket
  • Northwest Utah plush throw blanket
  • Northwest Utah rug
  • Legacy Utah vintage game poster artwork
  • Legacy Utah wall-mount bottle opener
  • Legacy Utah serving tray
  • Paulson Designs Utah athletic logo canvas art
  • Authentic Street Signs “Man Cave” sign
  • Dahl large vinyl decal

and more Utah Red Zone merchandise.

Utah fans can enter to win the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway by going to URedZone.com/FanCaveGiveaway. The lucky winner will be randomly selected at the conclusion of the Utah Football season.

For more information, call or visit Utah Red Zone or the University Campus Store.


Highlighted Events

CUBA: COMMUNITY, COMPLEXITY AND CHANGE
Monday, Nov. 28, 2016 | 12-1 p.m.
Building 73, Hinckley Caucus Room

cu-lgflag
Reflections from Fall Break 2016 Cuba Learning Abroad Program. Join us for pizza and politics with a panel of student participants.

Cosponsored by the Bennion Center.

Presented by  Sam Rich International Politics Fund.


DAUGHTER OF KALASH: A FREE FILM FROM THE ASIA CENTER AND MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 | 2 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditroium

daugherofkalash
Pakistani film maker, Ms. Mehak Asad, will be here to present her film, Daughter of Kalash. She will give an introduction to the film and take questions. A reception will follow the film presentation and remarks.

Daughter of Kalash: A short documentary about the Kalash valley and the people that believe in Gods. Kalash religion is in danger because they are left with 3000 followers. This is a story about struggle and achievements of a girl who belongs to this beautiful place and now is trying to protect her culture and religion. They call her “Daughter of Kalash.”


‘CLASS, POVERTY AND URBAN SUSTAINABILITY IN BANGALORE, INDIA’
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 | 4-5 p.m.
Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building, Room 210

black-hole
Dr. Manisha Anantharaman studies the links between class identity, poverty and sustainability in “green” lifestyle practices such as biking and recycling. Through an ethnographic study of elite, middle class and poor environmental activists in Bangalore, India, Anantharaman explores how alliances between these different social groups advance a more just society for all.

On Nov. 29, 4 p.m., ASB 210, Anantharaman will present this research at the Global Change and Sustainability Center’s Seminar Series.

The event is free and open to all. Refreshments and meet-the-speaker at 3:45 pm.

Click here to learn more about the seminar.


FREE FILM SCREENING: BEFORE THE FLOOD
Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 | 6 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium

beforetheflood
From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Fisher Stevens and Academy Award®-winning actor, environmental activist and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio, Before the Flood presents a riveting account of the dramatic changes now occurring around the world due to climate change, as well as the actions we as individuals and as a society can take to prevent the disruption of life on our planet. Beyond the steps we can take as individuals, the film urges viewers to push their elected officials in supporting the use of alternative energy sources such as solar and wind power.


UMFA’S DAY WITH(OUT) ART
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016
Utah Museum of Fine Arts


dwa_logo_blackonwhite
The UMFA will cover Deborah Butterfield’s bronze sculpture, Rex (2002), which stands sentry at the Museum’s entrance, on Thursday, Dec. 1, in recognition of Day With(out) Art. Thousands of museums and galleries worldwide will close or remove important artworks from display to honor individual legacies, commemorate personal loss, and increase awareness of the global AIDS epidemic.


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN DAY
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Union – Ballroosm, Saltair Room and Corridor

mechanical-engineering-day
Senior Design Showcase
11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Cutting-edge projects developed by students

Junior Mechatronics Competition: Shuttle Run
1-3 p.m.

Second Semester Freshman Competition PoKéPoNg: Gotta Catch ‘Em All!
12-3 p.m.

First Semester Freshman Design Competition Global Solutions
12-3:30 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

For more information, click here.


CANCER, BIG DATA AND THE PUBLIC
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 9 a.m. | Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 1 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law, Moot Courtroom, Level 6

2016-precision-medicine-event_edit_yhnsph
Leading experts in medicine, bioinformatics, law, policy and ethics will discuss major questions raised by precision medicine, the Precision Medicine Initiative and the Cancer Moonshot. The initiative, announced in 2015, will be the largest study of human genetics and health in history, aimed at increasing understanding of the genetic basis of disease and forging the way for new diagnostic and therapeutic innovations.

The initiative is linked to the Cancer Moonshot, another national effort aimed at curing cancer using big data and precision oncology techniques.


THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 5:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 2-Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 7:30 p.m.
Alice Sheets Marriott Center for Dance

the-long-and-short-of-it
The University of Utah’s School of Dance is pleased to announce the Modern Dance Graduate Thesis Concert “The Long and Short of It.” The concert premieres original dance works by MFA candidates Rebecca Aneloski, Ching-I Bigelow, Natalie Gotter and Huiwang Zhang.This evening of dance combines storytelling and theory through choreographic, creative and theoretical research. Themes of the female body in relation to agency and worth, foreignness and relationships found between the colonizer and the colonized, the bodies recollection of memory and humanities attempt at reconciliation in relationship to the self and others.

Don’t miss “The Long and Short of It” this Dec. 1-3 at the Hayes Christensen Theater. Thursday’s performance takes place at 5:30 p.m. and the Friday and Saturday performance will be at 7:30 p.m.

Free admission with U Arts Pass for U students. $12 for adults, $8 students, faculty and seniors. Go here to purchase tickets.


UTAH HOCKEY HOLIDAY SKATE WITH THE TEAM
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 7-9 p.m.
The Gallivan Center

utah-hockey
Join the University of Utah Hockey for their 2nd Annual Holiday Skate with the Team on this beautiful outdoor rink in downtown Salt Lake City.

Student tickets: $4
Adult tickets: $8

Click here to purchase tickets.


AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS AND A CHRISTMAS CAROL
Thursday, Dec. 1-Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 2 p.m.
Grand Theatre, Salt Lake Community College

night-visitors
The Lyric Opera Ensemble and Sinfonia Salt Lake present the classic Christmas opera, Amahl and the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Menotti. Also on the program is a brand-new operatic setting of A Christmas Carol with libretto and score by University of Utah music students Anthony Buck and Michael Leavitt.

Amahl and the Night Visitors is one of the most beloved and enchanting operas ever written. The story follows a shepherd boy who discovers a new star, hosts three Kings in his mother’s shabby home, and ultimately experiences a much-needed miracle. The production is directed by doctoral student David Sauer and will feature a cast of U of U School of Music students. Dr. Robert Baldwin will conduct the singers and the newly formed professional chamber orchestra, Sinfonia of Salt Lake.  Amahl premiered on television (the first opera to do so) in 1951 and ran every year on NBC until 1966. The Lyric Opera Ensemble has produced this one-act classic several times.

U of U graduate students Michael Leavitt and Anthony Buck wrote the score and libretto for the new operatic setting of A Christmas Carol specifically for this event, tailoring the music to Lyric Opera Ensemble members and even some School of Music faculty who will sing key roles. Librettist Anthony Buck (who will also direct the production) has long loved the story. 



2ND ANNUAL SENDSATIONS BOULDERING COMPETITION
Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 4-9 p.m.
The Summit, Eccles Student Life Center

sendsations-bouldering-comp-2016-box
The 2nd Annual Sendsations Bouldering Competition is just around the corner.  Registration is $5 and we have a ton of prizes from Black Diamond, Pieps, Petz, Deuter and more.

Look for the online registration link at campusrec.utah.edu or call 801.581.8516 for more information.


UTAH HOCKEY
Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 8-10:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 7:30-10 p.m.

Salt Lake City Sports Complex

utah-hockey
On Friday Utah takes on BYU at home for their first meeting of the season.

On Saturday, The Utes and Aggies clash for the second time at the Utah Ice Sheet this season. The Utes are 6-1-1 over the last two seasons against Utah State.

Student tickets: $4
Adult tickets: $8

Parking is free and rink location can be found here.

Go here to purchase tickets.


OLIVER!
Friday, Dec. 2-Saturday, Dec. 17, 2016
Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre

oliver-featured-image
Pioneer Theatre Company presents Oliver!, the award-winning musical by Lionel Bart inspired by the orphan’s tale, Oliver Twist, written by Charles Dickens. Oliver! runs Dec. 2 to Dec. 17, 2016.

Charles Dickens’ tale of the plucky orphan has been turned into a rousing musical featuring one of the most memorable Broadway scores ever written, including “Food, Glorious Food,” “Where Is Love?,” “Consider Yourself,” “You’ve Got To Pick A Pocket or Two,” “Who Will Buy,” and more. Oliver! was the first musical adaptation of Dickens’ to become a stage hit. It debuted on Broadway in 1963, winning the Tony Award for Best Musical Score and has enjoyed several revivals over the years. It was turned into a movie in 1968, winning the Academy Award for Best Picture.

The professional Equity cast of 14 is joined by local cast members, including 13 child actors.

PRICES:
$40 – $62 in advance and $5 more when purchased on the day of the show.
Kids in grades K-12 are half-price on Mondays and Tuesdays.

For more information, go here or call the box office at 801-581-696.


ANNUAL HOLIDAY MARKET
Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
UMFA

2015_holiday_market63
Find classic and contemporary hand-crafted items by local artisans for your holiday shopping list.

Free admission and parking, along with complimentary gift wrapping.


HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND ART FAIR
Saturday, Dec. 3-Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016
Red Butte Garden

holiday-open-house

Find unique handmade gifts for the holidays.

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the holiday open house at Red Butte Garden. The orangerie will be filled with about 19 local artists who have created an array of handmade gifts for sale including jewelry, glass art, pottery, fiber art and more.

There will also be complimentary cider, hot chocolate and a winter wonderland of a garden to explore. So bring your shopping list, your winter boots and enjoy the season with us at the garden.

Check out the holiday open house Facebook event page for updates about the featured artists.

Save 10 percent on all purchases in the garden gift shop. Garden members receive an additional 10 percent off  on Dec. 3-4 only.


THE 7TH ANNUAL LOWER LIGHTS CHRISTMAS
Monday, Dec. 5-Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016 | 7-9 p.m.
Kingsbury Hall

The Lower Lights, photographed by Justin Hackworth

The Lower Lights, photographed by Justin Hackworth

The Lower Lights Christmas concerts have gained popularity as an alternately reverent and rollicking night of Christmas songs, as sung, strummed, plucked, thumped, belted, and otherwise interpreted by the gospel/folk/bluegrass collective.

U students $5 with UCard.

Tickets: $15, $22 and $27. Purchase tickets here.

All ages show. Everyone must have a ticket regardless of age. Children under two are free but must have a ticket (select child ticket at checkout). No lap sitting allowed.


RIO GRANDE: CHALLENGING HOMELESSNESS DOWNTOWN
Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016 | 12-1:30 p.m.
Bennion Center, Union, Room 101

bennion-center-university-red-black-jpg
What is really going on in Salt Lake’s Rio Grande district and how can community members help people who are homeless? University of Utah students, faculty, staff and community members are invited to explore that topic on Tuesday, Dec. 6, at a panel discussion titled, “Rio Grande: Challenging Homelessness Downtown.” The event is scheduled from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Bennion Center, Union room 101. Limited free lunch will be offered.

The panel will include representatives from The Road Home, private businesses, law enforcement and mental health professionals. Coming on the heels of “Operation Diversion,” a multi-pronged approach to ridding the area of crime while helping people who are homeless, the lunch time forum will give participants an opportunity to better understand Rio Grande’s complexities. Panelists will also share resources and strategies for those who may want to help.


ISSUES AND ACTION LUNCH
Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016 | 12-1 p.m.
Bennion Center, Room 101

issues-and-actions
What can university students to do actively engage in addressing the important issues of the day? Find out when you join campus and community experts to dive deeper into your role as an active citizen in a global environment.

Pizza is limited but ideas are endless. Join us.

For more information, click here.


FACULTY AND STAFF APPRECIATION NIGHT
Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016 | 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.
University Campus Store

campus-store-christmas-cropped
On Thursday, December 8, the University Campus Store will host its annual Faculty and Staff Appreciation Night, showing gratitude and support for the university community by offering 30 percent off purchases all day, from 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Join your friends at the Campus Store for refreshments, prizes and fun and get your holiday shopping started with new Utes outerwear and apparel, toys, games, gifts and more.

The evening’s events will include:

  • 30 percent discount on total purchases (excludes electronics, software, textbooks, services and diploma frames)
  • Light refreshments will be served from 5-7 p.m. (or while they last)
  • An appearance by Santa who will pose for pictures from 5-7 p.m.
  • Prize raffles starting at 5 p.m., tickets issued upon entry beginning at 4:30 p.m. (winners must be present to receive prize)
  • Free gift wrapping from 4-8 p.m.
  • Free parking in the Campus Store pay lot with store validation

To receive your 30 percent discount, please show your UCard or most recent pay stub at the register upon purchase.

The Campus Store thanks you for your continued support and for all that you do for the University of Utah. We look forward to seeing you and your family on this special night.

The University Campus Store is located at 270 S. 1500 E. For more information about Faculty and Staff Appreciation Night, call 801-581-6326.


FACULTY CLUB
Friday, Dec. 9, 2016 | 5-7:30 p.m.
Moran Eye Center Auditorium

2016 copy

The University of Utah Faculty Club presents its annual Children’s Holiday Party. This event is for children and grandchildren of faculty, ages 4-12.

Join us for a special program by the University Musical Theatre Ensemble, the Balloon Granny, Jub Jub the Clown, craft booth, face painting, photos and holiday treats…plus a visit from you know who.

This event is free for members, but reservations are required by Wednesday, Dec. 7. For non-members the cost is $10 per family, but you may join at the door.

Contact Maddy Oritt at 801-581-5203 or maddy.oritt@utah.edu.


FACULTY CLUB ANNUAL HOLIDAY DINNER PARTY
Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016 | Social at 6 p.m. | Dinner at 6:45 p.m.
Thomas S. Monson Center, 411 E. South Temple

2016 Adult Dinner
Join the Faculty Club for their annual holiday dinner party at the Thomas S. Monson Center on Thursday, Dec. 15. The social will begin at 6 p.m. with dinner at 6:45 p.m. There will be a D.J., dancing and a white elephant gift exchange after. Please bring a wrapped item (of limited value, silly or outrageous) for the exchange.

Reservations are required by Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016. Please contact Maddy Oritt at maddy.oritt@utah.edu or 801-581-5203.

For more information, visit facultyclub.utah.edu.


GLASS ART SHOW
Now through Sunday, Dec. 18, 2016
Red Butte Garden

glass-art
The Glass Art Guild of Utah returns to Red Butte Garden for another stunning show of kiln work and blown glass. Large and small pieces including garden art, decorative boxes, sculptural works and jewelry pieces will display the brilliant colors of this delightful medium.

Items displayed will be available for sale.

Meet the Artists Reception on Saturday, Nov. 12 from 2-6 p.m.

Visit redbuttegarden.org/glass-art-show for more information.


IDA MATCHED SAVINGS PROGRAM
Monday, Dec. 19-Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2016 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
University Student Apartments, Building 722

ida-matched-savings-program
Could you use a $4,500 Grant?

Do you need help paying for college, buying your first home or starting your own business? The Utah Individual Development Account Network provides matched savings accounts to qualified participants who receive a $3 match toward every $1 they save (up to $1,500).

For more information about this program and to see if you qualify, visit uidan.org.

Required personal money management classes:
This single even lasts for a total of two meetings

Monday, Dec. 19, 2016 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2016 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m.

This workshop is open to the public and breakfast will be served.

Public transportation is recommended as no free parking will be available.

RSVP required. To RSVP, click here. Class registration will be available in soon.


YELLOW LEAVES, SHAKESPEARE AND HIS TIMES: AN EXHIBITION
Now through Friday, Jan. 6, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 4

yellowleavesubnwlogo
In commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, the J. Willard Marriott Library presents an exhibition exploring his life and work.  Centered upon selections from the First Folio (1623) and other historical editions of his poetry and plays, the exhibit examines the historical context of Shakespeare’s writing, posthumous attempts at uncovering his biography, the influences upon his plays, and portrayals of renowned performances.


THE POWER OF POISON
Through April 16, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah

goldendartfrog_amnh_t-grant-cropped
Mystery and intrigue are afoot at NHMU’s new Power of Poison exhibit. Learn more about the role of poison for good and ill in nature, history, myths and legends and real life. Complete with live animals, technical wonders and a touch of live theater, there is something to fascinate the explorer in everyone.

NHMU is the only stop on “The Power of Poison” tour that displays live animals. When visitors step into “Poison in Nature,” they enter the Chocó forest of Columbia where live golden poison arrow frogs peer up from their tanks. These brightly-colored amphibians can fit into your shirt pocket, but they would be a deadly accessory; their skin secretes a substance so toxic that the poison from one frog can kill 10 grown humans.

Purchase tickets here.


Campus Events

CUBA: COMMUNITY, COMPLEXITY AND CHANGE
Monday, Nov. 28, 2016 | 12-1 p.m.
Building 73, Hinckley Caucus Room

cu-lgflag
Reflections from Fall Break 2016 Cuba Learning Abroad Program. Join us for pizza and politics with a panel of student participants.

Cosponsored by the Bennion Center.

Presented by Sam Rich International Politics Fund.


UTAH ENTREPRENEUR CHALLENGE: SUBMISSIONS OPEN
Monday, Nov. 28, 2016
Online

entrepreneur-series
All university students in the state are welcome to submit their business models online to compete for more than $100,000 in cash and prizes.

For more information, click here.


BACKCOUNTRY MEET AND EAT AT CENTRAL CAREER SERVICES
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Student Services Building, Room 380

meet-and-eat
Meet & Eat with Backcountry.com on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 at 12:30 p.m.

Free lunch will be provided and an informal lunch setting. Meet & Eat events provide an opportunity for students to connect with employers and gain valuable information about industries, internships, careers, interviews and more.

Come and enjoy a free lunch and learn about the great opportunities Backcountry.com has to offer.


DAUGHTER OF KALASH: A FREE FILM FROM THE ASIA CENTER AND MARRIOTT LIBRARY
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 | 2 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditroium

daugherofkalash
Pakistani film maker, Ms. Mehak Asad, will be here to present her film, Daughter of Kalash. She will give an introduction to the film and take questions. A reception will follow the film presentation and remarks.

Daughter of Kalash: A short documentary about the Kalash valley and the people that believe in Gods. Kalash religion is in danger because they are left with 3000 followers. This is a story about struggle and achievements of a girl who belongs to this beautiful place and now is trying to protect her culture and religion. They call her “Daughter of Kalash.”


‘CLASS, POVERTY AND URBAN SUSTAINABILITY IN BANGALORE, INDIA’
Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 | 4-5 p.m.
Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building, Room 210

black-hole
Dr. Manisha Anantharaman studies the links between class identity, poverty and sustainability in “green” lifestyle practices such as biking and recycling. Through an ethnographic study of elite, middle class and poor environmental activists in Bangalore, India, Anantharaman explores how alliances between these different social groups advance a more just society for all.

On Nov. 29, 4 p.m., ASB 210, Anantharaman will present this research at the Global Change and Sustainability Center’s Seminar Series.

The event is free and open to all. Refreshments and meet-the-speaker at 3:45 pm.

Click here to learn more about the seminar.


WORKSHOP: VIDEO STORYTELLING
Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 | 2-3 p.m.
Lassonde Studios

workshops
In this workshop, we will learn how to create a video pitch that will help sell your idea. A very valuable skill in our “Shark Tank”-fueled economy.


FREE FILM SCREENING: BEFORE THE FLOOD
Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 | 6 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium

beforetheflood
From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Fisher Stevens and Academy Award®-winning actor, environmental activist and U.N. Messenger of Peace Leonardo DiCaprio, Before the Flood presents a riveting account of the dramatic changes now occurring around the world due to climate change, as well as the actions we as individuals and as a society can take to prevent the disruption of life on our planet. Beyond the steps we can take as individuals, the film urges viewers to push their elected officials in supporting the use of alternative energy sources such as solar and wind power.


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING DESIGN DAY
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Union – Ballroosm, Saltair Room and Corridor

mechanical-engineering-day
Senior Design Showcase
11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Cutting-edge projects developed by students

Junior Mechatronics Competition: Shuttle Run
1-3 p.m.

Second Semester Freshman Competition PoKéPoNg: Gotta Catch ‘Em All!
12-3 p.m.

First Semester Freshman Design Competition Global Solutions
12-3:30 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

For more information, click here.


MUSE LUNCHTIME LECTURE
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 12:15-1:15 p.m.
Sill Center, Large Conference Room

lunchtime-lecture
On the first Thursday of each month during the academic year, MUSE invites an inspiring University of Utah faculty member to present a Lunchtime Lecture in relation to our 2016-17 theme of Optimism. Join us in the Sill Center at noon for FREE LUNCH and an hour of unique perspectives on the theme.

Our Lunchtime Lectures provide great opportunities for you to meet students with similar interests and to connect with some of the most prominent professors from all different colleges and departments across campus.


CANCER, BIG DATA AND THE PUBLIC
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 9 a.m. | Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 1 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law, Moot Courtroom, Level 6

2016-precision-medicine-event_edit_yhnsph
Leading experts in medicine, bioinformatics, law, policy and ethics will discuss major questions raised by precision medicine, the Precision Medicine Initiative and the Cancer Moonshot. The initiative, announced in 2015, will be the largest study of human genetics and health in history, aimed at increasing understanding of the genetic basis of disease and forging the way for new diagnostic and therapeutic innovations.

The initiative is linked to the Cancer Moonshot, another national effort aimed at curing cancer using big data and precision oncology techniques.


ASUU OPEN HOUSE
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 5:30-6:30 p.m.
ASUU Office, Union 234

asuu-logo
Join ASUU for an open house and enjoy desserts in its newly renovated office space. Learn more about what resources ASUU can offer to student groups, how to get involved with ASUU and how to use the ASUU office space for meetings or events. The event showcases ASUU’s new space and provides an opportunity for students to give feedback to ASUU leaders.


THE LONG AND SHORT OF IT
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 5:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 2-Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 7:30 p.m.
Alice Sheets Marriott Center for Dance

the-long-and-short-of-it
The University of Utah’s School of Dance is pleased to announce the Modern Dance Graduate Thesis Concert “The Long and Short of It.” The concert premieres original dance works by MFA candidates Rebecca Aneloski, Ching-I Bigelow, Natalie Gotter and Huiwang Zhang.This evening of dance combines storytelling and theory through choreographic, creative and theoretical research. Themes of the female body in relation to agency and worth, foreignness and relationships found between the colonizer and the colonized, the bodies recollection of memory and humanities attempt at reconciliation in relationship to the self and others.

Don’t miss “The Long and Short of It” this Dec. 1-3 at the Hayes Christensen Theater. Thursday’s performance takes place at 5:30 p.m. and the Friday and Saturday performance will be at 7:30 p.m.

Free admission with U Arts Pass for U students. $12 for adults, $8 students, faculty and seniors. Go here to purchase tickets.


UTAH HOCKEY HOLIDAY SKATE WITH THE TEAM
Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 | 7-9 p.m.
The Gallivan Center

utah-hockey
Join the University of Utah Hockey for their 2nd Annual Holiday Skate with the Team on this beautiful outdoor rink in downtown Salt Lake City.

Student tickets: $4
Adult tickets: $8

Click here to purchase tickets.


AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS AND A CHRISTMAS CAROL
Thursday, Dec. 1-Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 2 p.m.
Grand Theatre, Salt Lake Community College

night-visitors
The Lyric Opera Ensemble and Sinfonia Salt Lake present the classic Christmas opera, Amahl and the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Menotti. Also on the program is a brand-new operatic setting of A Christmas Carol with libretto and score by University of Utah music students Anthony Buck and Michael Leavitt.

Amahl and the Night Visitors is one of the most beloved and enchanting operas ever written. The story follows a shepherd boy who discovers a new star, hosts three Kings in his mother’s shabby home, and ultimately experiences a much-needed miracle. The production is directed by doctoral student David Sauer and will feature a cast of U of U School of Music students. Dr. Robert Baldwin will conduct the singers and the newly formed professional chamber orchestra, Sinfonia of Salt Lake. Amahl premiered on television (the first opera to do so) in 1951 and ran every year on NBC until 1966. The Lyric Opera Ensemble has produced this one-act classic several times.

U of U graduate students Michael Leavitt and Anthony Buck wrote the score and libretto for the new operatic setting of A Christmas Carol specifically for this event, tailoring the music to Lyric Opera Ensemble members and even some School of Music faculty who will sing key roles. Librettist Anthony Buck (who will also direct the production) has long loved the story.


2ND ANNUAL SENDSATIONS BOULDERING COMPETITION
Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 4-9 p.m.
The Summit, Eccles Student Life Center

sendsations-bouldering-comp-2016-box
The 2nd Annual Sendsations Bouldering Competition is just around the corner. Registration is $5 and we have a ton of prizes from Black Diamond, Pieps, Petz, Deuter and more.

Look for the online registration link at campusrec.utah.edu or call 801.581.8516 for more information.


UTAH HOCKEY
Friday, Dec. 2, 2016 | 8-10:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 7:30-10 p.m.

Salt Lake City Sports Complex

utah-hockey
On Friday Utah takes on BYU at home for their first meeting of the season.

On Saturday, The Utes and Aggies clash for the second time at the Utah Ice Sheet this season. The Utes are 6-1-1 over the last two seasons against Utah State.

Student tickets: $4
Adult tickets: $8

Parking is free and rink location can be found here.

Go here to purchase tickets.


OLIVER!
Friday, Dec. 2-Saturday, Dec. 17, 2016
Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre

oliver-featured-image
Pioneer Theatre Company presents Oliver!, the award-winning musical by Lionel Bart inspired by the orphan’s tale, Oliver Twist, written by Charles Dickens. Oliver! runs Dec. 2 to Dec. 17, 2016.

Charles Dickens’ tale of the plucky orphan has been turned into a rousing musical featuring one of the most memorable Broadway scores ever written, including “Food, Glorious Food,” “Where Is Love?,” “Consider Yourself,” “You’ve Got To Pick A Pocket or Two,” “Who Will Buy,” and more. Oliver! was the first musical adaptation of Dickens’ to become a stage hit. It debuted on Broadway in 1963, winning the Tony Award for Best Musical Score and has enjoyed several revivals over the years. It was turned into a movie in 1968, winning the Academy Award for Best Picture.

The professional Equity cast of 14 is joined by local cast members, including 13 child actors.

PRICES:
$40 – $62 in advance and $5 more when purchased on the day of the show.
Kids in grades K-12 are half-price on Mondays and Tuesdays.

For more information, go here or call the box office at 801-581-696.


ANNUAL HOLIDAY MARKET
Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016 | 11 a.m.–5 p.m.
UMFA

2015_holiday_market63
Find classic and contemporary hand-crafted items by local artisans for your holiday shopping list.

Free admission and parking, along with complimentary gift wrapping.


HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND ART FAIR
Saturday, Dec. 3-Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016
Red Butte Garden

holiday-open-house

Find unique handmade gifts for the holidays.

This year marks the 15th anniversary of the holiday open house at Red Butte Garden. The orangerie will be filled with about 19 local artists who have created an array of handmade gifts for sale including jewelry, glass art, pottery, fiber art and more.

There will also be complimentary cider, hot chocolate and a winter wonderland of a garden to explore. So bring your shopping list, your winter boots and enjoy the season with us at the garden.

Check out the holiday open house Facebook event page for updates about the featured artists.

Save 10 percent on all purchases in the garden gift shop. Garden members receive an additional 10 percent off on Dec. 3-4 only.


THE 7TH ANNUAL LOWER LIGHTS CHRISTMAS
Monday, Dec. 5-Saturday, Dec. 10, 2016 | 7-9 p.m.
Kingsbury Hall

The Lower Lights, photographed by Justin Hackworth

The Lower Lights, photographed by Justin Hackworth

The Lower Lights Christmas concerts have gained popularity as an alternately reverent and rollicking night of Christmas songs, as sung, strummed, plucked, thumped, belted, and otherwise interpreted by the gospel/folk/bluegrass collective.

U students $5 with UCard.

Tickets: $15, $22 and $27. Purchase tickets here.

All ages show. Everyone must have a ticket regardless of age. Children under two are free but must have a ticket (select child ticket at checkout). No lap sitting allowed.


RIO GRANDE: CHALLENGING HOMELESSNESS DOWNTOWN
Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016 | 12-1:30 p.m.
Bennion Center, Union, Room 101

issues-and-actions
What is really going on in Salt Lake’s Rio Grande district and how can community members help people who are homeless? University of Utah students, faculty, staff and community members are invited to explore that topic on Tuesday, Dec. 6, at a panel discussion titled, “Rio Grande: Challenging Homelessness Downtown.” The event is scheduled from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Bennion Center, Union room 101. Limited free lunch will be offered.

The panel will include representatives from The Road Home, private businesses, law enforcement and mental health professionals. Coming on the heels of “Operation Diversion,” a multi-pronged approach to ridding the area of crime while helping people who are homeless, the lunch time forum will give participants an opportunity to better understand Rio Grande’s complexities. Panelists will also share resources and strategies for those who may want to help.


FACULTY CLUB ANNUAL HOLIDAY DINNER PARTY
Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016 | Social at 6 p.m. | Dinner at 6:45 p.m.
Thomas S. Monson Center, 411 E. South Temple

2016 Adult Dinner
Join the Faculty Club for their annual holiday dinner party at the Thomas S. Monson Center on Thursday, Dec. 15. The social will begin at 6 p.m. with dinner at 6:45 p.m. There will be a D.J., dancing and a white elephant gift exchange after. Please bring a wrapped item (of limited value, silly or outrageous) for the exchange.

Reservations are required by Thursday, Dec. 8, 2016. Please contact Maddy Oritt at maddy.oritt@utah.edu or 801-581-5203.

For more information, visit facultyclub.utah.edu.


GLASS ART SHOW
Now through Sunday, Dec. 18, 2016
Red Butte Garden

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The Glass Art Guild of Utah returns to Red Butte Garden for another stunning show of kiln work and blown glass. Large and small pieces including garden art, decorative boxes, sculptural works and jewelry pieces will display the brilliant colors of this delightful medium.

Items displayed will be available for sale.

Meet the Artists Reception on Saturday, Nov. 12 from 2-6 p.m.

Visit redbuttegarden.org/glass-art-show for more information.


IDA MATCHED SAVINGS PROGRAM
Monday, Dec. 19-Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2016 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
University Student Apartments, Building 722

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Could you use a $4,500 Grant?

Do you need help paying for college, buying your first home or starting your own business? The Utah Individual Development Account Network provides matched savings accounts to qualified participants who receive a $3 match toward every $1 they save (up to $1,500).

For more information about this program and to see if you qualify, visit uidan.org.

Required personal money management classes:
This single even lasts for a total of two meetings

Monday, Dec. 19, 2016 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 20, 2016 | 8 a.m.-12 p.m.

This workshop is open to the public and breakfast will be served.

Public transportation is recommended as no free parking will be available.

RSVP required. To RSVP, click here. Class registration will be available in soon.


YELLOW LEAVES, SHAKESPEARE AND HIS TIMES: AN EXHIBITION
Now through Friday, Jan. 6, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 4

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In commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, the J. Willard Marriott Library presents an exhibition exploring his life and work. Centered upon selections from the First Folio (1623) and other historical editions of his poetry and plays, the exhibit examines the historical context of Shakespeare’s writing, posthumous attempts at uncovering his biography, the influences upon his plays, and portrayals of renowned performances.


THE POWER OF POISON
Through April 16, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah

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Mystery and intrigue are afoot at NHMU’s new Power of Poison exhibit. Learn more about the role of poison for good and ill in nature, history, myths and legends and real life. Complete with live animals, technical wonders and a touch of live theater, there is something to fascinate the explorer in everyone.

NHMU is the only stop on “The Power of Poison” tour that displays live animals. When visitors step into “Poison in Nature,” they enter the Chocó forest of Columbia where live golden poison arrow frogs peer up from their tanks. These brightly-colored amphibians can fit into your shirt pocket, but they would be a deadly accessory; their skin secretes a substance so toxic that the poison from one frog can kill 10 grown humans.

Purchase tickets here.


A Healthier U

SNOOZING YOUR WAY TO BETTER HEALTH

Did you know that muscles are built while you’re asleep at night? That’s right. As you drift off to la la land your body is working hard to repair microscopic tears in the individual muscle cells (sarcomeres). If you are training to overload, you incur these microscopic tears and this is where muscle growth becomes possible. During sleep the body releases human growth hormone and amino acids necessary to repair the sarcomeres and build more muscle cells, aka making gains.

The National Sleep Foundation recommends that adults get 7-9 hours of sleep per night. In regards to the demands of modern life it can be next to impossible to set aside this much time for sleep each night.

However, making sleep a priority will benefit your health in a multitude of ways.  Rebuilding muscle isn’t the only thing your body is during each night. Healthy sleep is also associated with improved mental and physical health and better performance at work and school.

While missing sleep can lead to deleterious health affects that individually and cumulatively amount to more than a groggy Monday morning, short-term effects include, lack of alertness, impaired memory, relationship stress and a greater likelihood for auto accidents, possible long-term effects of sleep deprivation can be much more serious. These include high blood pressure, elevated cortisol levels, heart failure, stroke, depression, diabetes and obesity.

Developing good sleep habits won’t happen overnight though. If you are looking to work towards healthy sleep there are a couple of general recommendations that may apply

  • Stick to the same sleep schedule every night
  • Turn off electronics and other distractions to prepare your body for rest
  • Get regular exercise
  • Avoid caffeine five hours prior to sleep
  • Avoid alcohol before bed
  • Avoid nicotine and other stimulants before bed
  • Practice nightly relaxation rituals
  • Make your bedroom a quiet and relaxing atmosphere

Make tonight a great night and hit the hay with these things in mind. After all, sleeping is free and a lot easier than lifting weights.

More information can be found here:

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/2015/09/happens-body-dont-get-enough-sleep/
https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-tools-tips/healthy-sleep-tips

HealthFeed

ARE E-CIGARETTES A GOOD WAY TO QUIT SMOKING?

Close up Young Blond Woman in Black Clothing Holding a Tobacco and E-Cigarette on a White Background.

Are e-Cigarettes a good way to wean yourself off regular cigarettes? Cardiologist Dr. Clint Allred has examined the research and answers this week’s listener question.

Read the full story here.

AVOIDING ASTHMA ATTACKS THIS WINTER

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Asthma may not be the first thing you think of when winter comes knocking, but the colder conditions can exacerbate symptoms for people with the condition. “The dry air dries out the mucus in the lungs, which is the natural barrier against temperature changes,” says Aaron Kobernick, MD, an immunologist with University of Utah Health Care. “This makes the smooth muscle more ‘twitchy’ and prone to asthma attacks when it comes in contact with the cold air.”

Cold weather also brings an uptick in colds and flu going around – both of which can make asthma symptoms worse. “Once again it’s the lack of mucus causing a problem,” says Kobernick. “Respiratory viruses take advantage of a reduced mucus barrier in the lung and causes trouble for asthmatics.”

Click here for the full story.

For more expert health news and information, visit healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed.