A Healthier U

Have an Idea to Improve Wellness at the University of Utah?

The University of Utah Health Sciences’ Office of Wellness & Integrative Health is excited to announce a new wellness grant program. Grant funding up to $1,000 is available for projects that enhance and promote wellness among our campus community.  Students, faculty and staff from all disciplines are invited to apply.

The mission of the Office of Wellness and Integrative Health is to champion wellness initiatives across campus and ensure that the University’s academic, health sciences and health care delivery system develop a stronger focus on health and wellness to serve our communities.

This new wellness grant program is a campus-wide initiative that encourages students, faculty and staff​ to propose projects that will inspire the campus community to take responsibility for their health and embrace healthy behaviors, while advocating for a healthy and inclusive community and environment. ​​ ​

Please submit a completed Wellness Grant application form by April 1, 2017.

EMAIL ALL INQUIRES AND APPLICATIONS TO WELLNESS@UTAH.EDU

Funding decisions will be made by May 1, 2017.

HealthFeed

HEARTBURN REMEDIES AND KIDNEY DAMAGE

Medications come with risks, and for years doctors have known people taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for heartburn and acid reflux may be at risk for kidney damage. It was previously thought that the decline in kidney function is acute and transient. However, a new study raises concerns that this may not be the case. In some patients, kidney problems can develop slowly over time and result in chronic kidney disease.

Read the full story here.

INFANT WEARABLES AND SAFETY

Parents worry about the health of their babies. It’s a fact. So, it’s understandable when they see a product that promises to help them monitor and care for their infant they would be interested. This is likely why we have seen an increase in the sales of baby “wearables” — small electronic devices that monitor the baby’s vital signs and deliver the information — and alerts if something is wrong — right to Dad’s or Mom’s cell phone.

Click here for the full story.

For more expert health news and information, visit healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed.