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January 2017 – Community Forum Newsletter


Next Community Forum


Thursday, May 18, 2017 | 6:30-8 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law, Sixth floor, Moot Courtroom Lobby
383 University Street, Salt Lake City

The May 2017 university forum will be an open house with experts (listed in agenda) available from 6:30-8 p.m. to present information and have meaningful discussions with community members.

The College of Law is located on the northeast corner of 400 S. and University Street (1400 East)

Free parking is available in the lot to the east of the law building and the Rice-Eccles Stadium parking lot. The university will not be enforcing parking during this meeting. We strongly encourage you to use public transportation, if possible. Take the TRAX University Red Line to the Stadium stop, the Red Route for the university’s free campus shuttles (Carlson Hall stop) and for other public transit options use UTA’s Trip Planner or click the “Transit” option under “Get Directions” on Google maps.

We welcome your attendance, comments, and participation in the discussion.

AGENDA of Next Forum


TBD – The agenda is still being set for the May meeting. If you have items you would like to see on the agenda, please fill out this form.

 

Recap of the JANUARY 2017 Community Forum


COMMUTER SERVICES
Alma Allred, executive director of Commuter Services, University of Utah

PARKING AND TRANSPORTATION MASTER PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  • Primary purpose: final piece of the Campus Master Plan
  • Contracted services with local company, Horrocks Engineers
  • Conducted over 18-month period starting in 2015
  • Successful campus and public outreach
  • Acknowledged successful programs/processes already in practice within Commuter Services. We achieved the original sustainability goal set in 2008
  • 24 policy recommendations
  • 100+ transformative projects proposed and evaluated

STUDY OBJECTIVES

1. Develop a campus transportation plan that focuses on:

  • Reducing single occupant vehicles (SOV)
  • Smart-growth and land use
  • Best management practices for all modes of transportation

2. Create a parking strategy based on data and assumptions that address needs resulting from the success/failure of the composite “transportation system.”

3. Approach the planning effort by reviewing and understanding regional mobility and multi-modal (pedestrian, bicycle, motorist, transit, parking, etc.) needs.

Goals:

  • Reduction of vehicular traffic
  • Enhance safety
  • Ensure clear and consistent way finding
  • Create a better overall campus mobility plan

COMMUTER SERVICES BEST CURRENT PRACTICES

1. Encourage and support public transportation

  • 10,000 sustained ridership
  • Game day ridership: eight to 10,000 fans in 35 minutes

2. Expand Campus shuttle system

  • Electric Shuttle, CNG Buses, new central campus route

3. Implement other transportation demand management actions

  • Three new parking garages

4. Improve planning

5. Virtual parking permits

6. Pay by phone and prepaid parking options

7. Car sharing and ride-sharing availability

SOME OF THE 24 POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS FROM THE STUDY:

  • Traffic calming
  • Promotion of mass transit
  • Transportation Demand Management (TDM)
  • Shared parking
  • Permit
  • Variable pricing
  • Incentive for bicycle use
  • Fine-tune campus shuttle
  • Media
  • Data collection
  • Way finding

100+ TRANSFORMATIVE PROJECTS

Scope range: small ($500) to large ($2M)

Projects include:

  • Intermodal transportation hub
  • Additional parking garages
  • Road enlargements and roundabouts
  • Changes to existing intersections
  • Road striping for shared use
  • Additional bike paths and sidewalks

PARKING RATIO

Current U parking ratio is .38 spaces per person. The parking ratio equals the total number of parking spaces per university population.
Low parking ratio (<0.3 spaces per user = possible parking deficiency)
High parking ratio (>0.5 spaces per user) = automobile dependency

THIS PLAN

  • Is a comprehensive look at parking and transportation on the university campus and Research Park
  • Can be used as a tool for campus master planning efforts
  • Includes neighboring roadways and jurisdictions where applicable
  • Includes a goal to reduce single occupant vehicle trips to less than 50 percent
  • Makes recommendations for capital projects and policies
  • Makes recommendations best achieved in conjunction with larger capital projects
  • Needs to be revisited annually in order to update data and keep viable

RESEARCH PARK
Jonathon Bates, executive director, University Real Estate Administration

UNIVERSITY RELOCATIONS TO DOWNTOWN

  • UIT/ITS relocation from 585 Komas and 650 Komas to 102 E. 100 South, removed 545 FTEs from Research Park.
  • Medical billing relocation from 650 Komas to 102 E. 100 South, removed 130 FTEs from Research Park.
  • Goldman Sachs relocation from 395 Chipeta to 111 S. Main Street, removed 499 FTEs from Research Park.
  • Total relocations: 1,174 FTEs

POPULATION TRENDS

BIOFIRE STATUS

  • BioFire has completed the bulk of their consolidating moves into their new facility located at 515 Colorow Way.
  • The University of Utah Research Foundation has exercised its Right of First Offer to assess the potential of purchasing the existing BioFire building located at 390 Wakara Way.
  • BioFire is still assessing its future plans for 400 Wakara Way and 410 Chipeta Way.


BASEBALL STADIUM FEASIBILITY STUDY
Jonathon Bates, executive director, University Real Estate Administration

The study is currently ongoing with the university having identified approximately 12 different potential sites. Recommendations will be forthcoming with future opportunities for public input and comment.

Criteria and measurable index for baseball stadium feasibility study

  1. Is compatible with the campus master plan’s guiding principles for future development; meets with U master planning criteria including the play field master plan.
  2. Total cost is reasonable, especially considering required site, user, and building relocations, and additional site expenses.
  3. Site has good visibility for easy public access, links to major campus roadways.
  4. Site can fit a full college baseball stadium, batting cages, 2,000 audience members, and has good solar orientation.
  5. Availability of at least 200 parking spots within walking distance for fans to park.
  6. Zoned near other athletic and training facilities.
  7. Schedule availability: Stadium can be started in the next five years.

 

 

RICE-ECCLES STADIUM SOUND STUDY
Matt Lundquist, senior industrial hygienist, Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety

UPDATE SINCE THE JANUARY 2017 MEETING

The university will be conducting a new study this year looking at the sound impacts south of Rice-Eccles Stadium.

2016 SOUND STUDY

University of Utah Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety (OEHS) conducted noise monitoring on Oct. 29, Nov. 4, and Nov. 19, 2016, along the university property lines (see map below for locations) in order to quantify noise levels present during two home football games in Rice-Eccles Stadium. The measurements taken on Oct. 29, were taken between 6:30 a.m. and 8:30 a.m., and 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. The morning measurements were taken during the ESPN College Game Day morning rally and the evening measurements were taken during the Utah vs. Washington State football game. The measurements taken on Nov. 19 were taken between 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. during the Utah vs. Oregon football game. Baseline measurements were taken on Nov. 4, 2016, between 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. during a normal campus work day at a time when no special events were taking place, for comparison purposes. Monitoring was conducted at the university property lines, see map below for details.

All measurements were taken using a Quest model 1800 sound level meter field calibrated prior to monitoring to 114 dBA at 1000 Hz. All measurements are in decibels, A weighted (dBA), slow response.

The following table shows the observed sound pressure levels:

Based on the observed data, it does not appear that a football game at the stadium adds significantly to the overall observed noise levels present along the campus property line during the average operational day.


CAMPUS CONSTRUCTION
Ken Nye, interim associate vice president, Facilities Management
Curtis Leetham, architectural project manager, Campus Planning

The campus map has a new routing feature that will help you get from point A to point B around all of the construction. Visit map.utah.edu.

PLANNING PROJECTS

Landscape Master Plan
This project's purpose is to have ecologically functional and locally appropriate landscapes, decrease irrigation, increase variety of trees and plants, and increase tree canopy. This is currently in the data collection and site analysis phase, which is approximately 65 percent complete.

FIELDS STUDY: CAMPUS RECREATION, ATHLETICS, AND COLLEGE OF HEALTH MASTER FACILITIES PLAN
This will identify permanent locations for student play fields, and improve the on-campus experience for students. The study is complete, but the projects have yet to be determined.

BURBIDGE CENTER EXPANSION
This 5,300 square-foot expansion will improve the building's usefulness and efficiency, while addressing the growth in the number of student athletes. This project will cost $2 million and approval is pending. Construction is scheduled for September 2017 and projected to be completed in March 2018.

GUEST HOUSE EXPANSION
This project is going before the legislature this session and will address the needs of hospital and clinic patients, their families, and university guests. The expansion is projected to cost $8.1 million and would reduce the trips to Health Sciences campus for families and visiting patients.

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE STUDY
This study will look at the overall condition of the College of Science buildings, study how effective each building is in meeting program needs, analyze academic plans and strategies, and recommend long-range plans for improvement. The study is scheduled to be complete by May 2017.

HOUSING MASTER PLAN UPDATE
This update will help meet current and future demand for on-campus first-year student housing, replace aging family housing units in multiple phases, and compete for prospective students. The impacts of this update include: improving student retention, time to degree, and reducing commuter traffic.

HEALTH SCIENCES CAMPUS ENERGY IMPROVEMENTS
This project will greatly improve the energy efficiency on the Health Sciences campus in order to avoid costly expansions of the central heating and cooling plant. This will also reduce air emissions. The project will cost $20-30 million, and include 22 Health Science buildings. The audit will be complete by May 2017 and the project is scheduled to be finished December 2019.

PROJECTS IN DESIGN

EXECUTIVE BUSINESS EDUCATION BUILDING (EMBA)
This building will be built on the former site of Milton Bennion Hall, which was demolished in February 2017. This new building will address the growth in the master's and executive education departments. The project cost is $40 million and 150,000 square feet. It's expected to be complete in August 2018, and will enhance the programming.

AMBULATORY CARE CENTER (ACC)
The old School of Medicine building, has seismic and safety concerns. This building, along with two smaller adjacent buildings, comprising 641,000 square feet will be demolished. The Ambulatory Care Center is one of three buildings that will replace it. It will house clinics, faculty offices and 72 patient rooms. Many existing functions and staff are being relocated to other locations off-campus. The project will cost $131.5 million and be 296,000 square feet. Construction began in February 2017.

REHABILITATION HOSPITAL
This project is the second building that will replace the outdated School of Medicine, and will add 75 patient rooms (replacing 28), include a rehab gym, clinic, and outdoor therapy space. This has been approved through design and the university is currently seeking legislative approval. It will cost $95 million for the 150,000-square-foot building.

MEDICAL EDUCATION AND DISCOVERY CENTER (MED)
This is the third building that will will be located at the old School of Medicine site with state of the art teaching and research space. The university is currently seeking legislative approval for the $185.5 million, and design to begin spring 2017.

PROJECTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION

CLEONE PETERSON ECCLES ALUMNI HOUSE
Additional space is required to serve the growing alumni – 265,000 worldwide – with building upgrades to the existing aging facility needed due to seismic, energy, and code issues. This project will cost $10.5 million. Construction began in fall 2016 and will be complete for fall 2017. This space will also be available for community use and can accommodate larger events and expanded meeting space.

CROCKER SCIENCE CENTER
The project renovates a portion of the former George Thomas Building with the balance demolished and replaced to meet science needs. It will provide new undergraduate labs and classroom space for the college. Cost of this project is $57.8 million and construction will be complete in fall 2017.

CAROLYN AND KEM GARDNER BUILDING
This new building will replace Orson Spencer Hall (OSH) for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, the main classroom facility on campus. It will consolidate department space from various locations. The project will cost $67.6 million with construction scheduled to be complete by fall 2018.

HORTICULTURE COMPOUND
This new compound will house Red Butte Garden Horticulture staff. This project will cost $5.5 million with construction completion by summer 2017.

HIGH TEMPERATURE WATER INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVEMENT
This $7.7 million project will replace existing and dated piping across campus with new pipe. There will be periodic pedestrian detours while work is being done and the project is scheduled to be complete by fall 2018.

ORTHOPEDIC CENTER EXPANSION
This $13.4 million expansion is needed to treat patient level that was originally projected for this space. Construction completion is anticipated for December 2017.

MADSEN SURGERY CENTER RENOVATIONS
This $6.5 million renovation project will update the existing surgery floor to serve as the geriatric clinic, as well as new building entrance and circulation improvements. This renovation will transfer approximately 20,000 patient visits per year from Health Sciences. Construction is expected to begin October 2017 and completed by August 2018.

HUNTSMAN CANCER CENTER PHASE IV
This project will provide 225,030 square feet of new research, office, and meeting space for the Huntsman Cancer Institute. The focus of this new building will be children's and family cancer. This project will cost $116 million with completion scheduled for May 2017.


 

Additional announcements


COME MEET ROBIN BURR, NEW CHIEF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OFFICER
Tuesday, Feb. 28, 2017 | 6-8 p.m.

Please join us as the University of Utah welcomes new Chief Design and Construction Officer Robin Burr. We welcome the public for an informal social on Tuesday, Feb. 28, from 6-8 p.m. in the Facilites Management café, located at 1795 E. South Campus Drive, on the second floor.

Burr will oversee campus planning and construction efforts.

Free parking is available in front of the building and light refreshments will be provided.


 

 

JOHN MCNARY RETIRED

John McNary, director of Campus Design and Construction, retired in December 2016. Ken Nye is currently serving as the interim associate vice president for Facilities Management.


DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS SEARCH ONGOING

Maria O'Mara, former communications director for the U, left in January 2017. She joins KUER as the general manager. The search for her replacement continues.


U WELCOMES NEW CHIEF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OFFICER

The University of Utah has hired Robin Burr, executive director of capital projects at Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, California, as the school’s chief design and construction officer, effective Feb. 21. Read more about Burr here.