‘GAMIFYING’ MEDICAL TREATMENT

U students win national competition for video game completely controlled by eye movement, helping treat and diagnose lazy eye in children.

Your lying eyes

When John Kircher, professor of educational psychology, arrived at the U as a graduate student in 1977, he wasn’t interested in studying lie detector technology, but after a sequence of events early in his career, he has become a leading expert in the detection of deception.

See the signs of diabetic retinopathy

Complications from diabetic retinopathy are largely preventable with effective management of blood sugars and early eye screening and treatment.

SIGHT KNIGHTS

Moran researchers garner support of Knights Templar Eye Foundation.

Genetic discovery in rare eye disease

John A. Moran Eye Center physician-researcher Paul S. Bernstein and his patients at the U played a key role in the recent discovery of the first genetic cause for a disease causing a gradual loss of central vision.

Prenatal opioid exposure

A U study finds sparse data on how children fare after prenatal opioid exposure.

Improving vision on the Navajo Nation

The grant will allow Moran to train existing health care workers in the Navajo Nation provider network to become certified ophthalmic assistants.

EYE ON THE PRIZE

Video game created by U students helps combat lazy eye in kids.