Campus Events

STEP IN, SPEAK UP: CONFRONTING BARRIERS TO INTERVENTION
March 21 Ι 2:30-4 p.m.
Union Theatre

Bystander Intervention is a skill students can use to intervene in, and potentially prevent, problematic situations to de-escalate harm. Come join our discussion-based forum to address the barriers we face when intervening in various scenarios. You will leave feeling more confident in your ability to intervene using various techniques! Open to students. Snacks will be provided.


SOCIAL JUSTICE LECTURE SERIES – BLACK.FLESH: A LITANY FOR RESISTANCE
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 | 6-8 p.m.
East Ballroom, Olpin University Union Building


“black.flesh: a litany for resistance” is a meditation on isolation, abjection, and Black rage. This performance piece delves into the idiosyncrasies of movement, gesture, and form to construct a narrative of black queer subjectivity under the duress of this heightened historical moment. The main question to be raised by Yasin “Ya-Ya” Fairley: “When does truth-telling become politicized?” This piece will move through various emotive states to give shape to a complex rendering of identity (race, gender, sexuality). Sound, text, costume, and props will help create an environment that gestures to what Ya-Ya calls, “an erotics of racism” (borrowed from Dr. Sharon P. Holland).

This event is free and open to the public.  CEUs are available for $10, payable by cash or check at the event.

Please direct inquiries to Irene Ota: irene.ota@socwk.utah.edu.


H2 LECTURE ON THE UTES NICKNAME 
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 Ι 5 p.m.
CTIHB, Room 109

Danielle Endres, associate professor of communication and director of the Communication Institute will discuss her Utes Nickname Project, an effort to promote awareness, education and research about the history and contemporary usage of Native American symbols. The Honors College awarded Endres with a H2 professorship, which is a partnership with the College of Humanities, allowing both areas to appoint joint faculty and explore new course opportunities. Shared faculty draw from the wide variety of humanities disciplines applied with the focus and innovation possible through Honors College curriculum, resulting in deeply challenging and enriching academic experiences.


RAISING OUR BABIES: HOW TO GIVE UTAH CHILDREN THE BEST START POSSIBLE 
Thursday, March 23, 2017 | 6:30-8 p.m.
Hinckley Caucus Room, Building 73

Utah is committed to its young children and families, which is reflected in the state’s strong showing in most measures of child well-being. But can we do even better? Knowing that early experiences get “under the skin,” how can we optimize infant care so that babies born today will reach their full potential as the adults of tomorrow? What does science say about how optimal care — by parents, relatives and professional caregivers — can be supported?

Those questions will be the focus of a discussion set for Thursday, March 23, sponsored by the College of Social and Behavioral Science, the Department of Family and Consumer Studies, The Department of Psychology and the Hinckley Institute. The event will begin with a screen of a video segment from the PBS series “The Raising of America” and then follow with an expert faculty panel discussion moderated by KUTV anchor Mary Nickles.

This event is free and open to the public.


INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR SERIES ON AGING: BRAIN HEALTH
Thursday, March 23, 2017 | 12-1:15 p.m.
Okazaki Community Meeting Room (155-B), College of Social Work


One of the greatest concerns expressed by older adults is fear of losing their cognitive abilities.  Memory loss and functional changes related to dementia are a common concern among middle-aged and older adults as they face the aging process.  Kevin Duff will discuss ways to enhance brain health and to assure that risks of memory changes are reduced.

This event is free and open to the public.

Please direct inquiries to Linda Mendenhall: linda.mendenhall@socwk.utah.edu.


DISCORDANCE IN THE AGE OF SPECIES
KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Thursday, March 23 | 7 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium, 295 S. 1500 East

The Department of Philosophy will host a conference, March 23-25 to explore species in the age of discordance. Biological lineages move through time, space and each other. As they do, they diversify, diverge and grade away from and into one another. One result of this is that the lineages of a biological entity may have different histories. This is seen on many levels such as microbial networks, holobionts and population-level lineages. The focus of this conference is whether and how this and other sorts of biological discordance impacts our views on species. The keynote lecture will be given by Quentin Wheeler, president of the college of environmental sciences and forestry at State University of New York, March 23 in the Marriott Library Gould Auditorium at 7 p.m. He will argue that a moonshot effort is needed to catalog remaining biodiversity before we lose so many species to extinction.


DIANA COX-FOSTER: BEES, ESSENTIAL KEYSTONES SUPPORTING OUR FOOD: ARE THEY IN DANGER?
Thursday, March 23, 2017 | 7 p.m.
The Salt Lake City Public Library


Pollinated crops feed millions of people by providing the world its fruit, vegetables, seeds, nuts, and oils. But pollinators, such as bees, have been dying off at an unprecedented rate. In our delicate food ecosystem, this loss can have devastating effects. An expert on honey bees, bumble bees, blue orchard bees, and alfalfa leaf-cutting bees, Dr. Diana Cox-Foster has pioneered research on pollinators and their vital role in our food system.

Join Cox-Foster, research leader and research entomologist at Utah State University, as she illuminates the work being done to understand and solve pollination management issues in the United States and around the world.

Reserve free seats here.


WATER IN THE WEST SYMPOSIUM
Thursday, March 23, 2017 Ι 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Friday, March 24, 2017 Ι 8:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Moot Courtroom, S.J. Quinney College of Law

The Wallace Stegner Center’s 22nd symposium will focus on “Water in the West: Untapped Solutions.” The symposium will address how the twin drivers of climate disruption and demographic change are likely to impact water availability in the West over the next 50 years. Specifically, the Symposium will address four sets of issues: changing law — legal innovations to address these issues; changing science and the role of technology in improving data-driven water resource planning and management; changing infrastructure and new approaches like recycling wastewater; and changing behaviors — creating incentives that bring about the changes needed to respond to a dynamic world. The symposium will be interdisciplinary in nature and include speakers from the physical, biological and social sciences, academia, government, industry, public interest organizations and the legal profession.


CRMRI SYMPOSIUM: CURRENT TRENDS IN RESEARCH
Friday, March 24, 2017 | Registration deadline
Friday, March 31, 2017 | Event from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m.
Okazaki Community Meeting Room (155-A), College of Social Work


The new Center for Research on Migration & Refugee Integration (CRMRI) is pleased to host their first research symposium!  Keynote speaker Dr. Gary Lichtenstein will present “Practice of Research: Research of Practice.”  University of Utah scholars and community partners will present on their current research projects, to be followed by poster presentations by U students.  Breakout networking sessions will focus on migration and human trafficking; integration; health and mental health access; and the Institutional Review Board.  Endnote speaker Dr. Ed Redd will present “Working with Refugee Populations in Northern Utah.”

Breakfast, lunch and parking are included.

This event is free and open to the public, however registration is required. Registration cutoff at 5 p.m. on March 24.

Please direct inquires to Delva Hommes: delva.hommes@socwk.utah.edu.


EXPLORING WAX: ENCAUSTIC TECHNIQUES WITH STACY PHILLIPS
Friday, March 24-Saturday, March 25, 2017 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Book Arts Studio, Level 4


Stacy Phillips guides students in basic and advanced encaustic techniques as they create works rich in layers and transparency. This workshop covers color application, methods of fusing, image transfers, mark making, pigment sticks, pastels, graphite, collage, equipment, history, and safety. Experimentation is encouraged—being open to possibilities sparks creativity and warms the wax.

Come with an open and curious mind and leave with a tool box of ideas to continue developing demonstrated techniques. Space is limited to 15 participants.


DOUBLE, DOUBLE TOIL AND TROUBLE: RECIPES TO BREW FINANCIAL CRISES
Sunday, March 26, 2017 | 3-4 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium


The Friends of the Marriott Library
Spring 2017 Sunday Books and Authors Series
Speaker: Cihan Bilginsoy

Why did the housing and mortgage-backed securities markets collapse in 2007? Did dot-com companies of the 1990s and English railway companies of the 1840s have anything in common that explains the boom and crash of their share prices? What menace scared the Bank of England in 1720, J.P. Morgan in 1907, and the Federal Reserve in 1929? Which was the better course of action for the government: saving Bear-Stearns or letting Lehman Brothers fail? How do supposedly rational investors so frequently succumb to euphoria and despair? Asset price bubbles and bank-runs have been an endemic feature of the capitalist system for centuries. The historical record offers a treasure trove of experience that may shed light on how and why financial crises happen.


SHERYL WUDUNN: FINDING HOPE AND SOLUTIONS TO EMPOWER WOMEN
Monday, March 27, 2017 | 6:30 p.m.
The Tower at Rice-Eccles Stadium

Business executive, activist and best-selling author Sheryl WuDunn will bring her empowering message about approaches for improving the status of women here and abroad to the U as the guest of the Barbara and Norman Tanner Center for Human Rights. WuDunn’s talk is part of the center’s spring forum on “Human Rights, Women’s Rights, and Women’s Leadership: A Priority Across the Globe.” The event is free and open to the public.


WOMEN IN BUSINESS PHILANTHROPY DRIVE
Monday, March 27, 2017 Ι 12:15 p.m.
SFEBB 3106

Silhouette of ten young women, walking hand in hand.

Come learn how you can make a difference in the community at the Women in Business Philanthropy Drive kick-off luncheon.

The lunch will feature a panel discussion on the narratives, statistics and key contributing factors of women experiencing homelessness, with presentations from representatives of The Road Home, the YWCA and South Valley Services. Women in Business also will kick-off its donation drive, which takes place March 27-April 24, with information about how you can get involved and help support these organizations. Click here for information about how to donate items.

For more information, contact tara.hardison@eccles.utah.edu or kris.fenn@eccles.utah.edu


ALTA AWARDS PRESENTATION & LECTURE
March 27, 2017 | 1-2 p.m.
Gould Auditorium

The Alta Awards will be given on March 27, 1-2 p.m. in the Gould Auditorium accompanied by a keynote lecture from wildlife biologist Douglas H. Chadwick.

Chadwick’s presentation will focus on the dustiest, thirstiest, bed-hair shaggiest—and rarest—bears in the world: Gobi grizzlies. They live on the outer edge of possibility among wild camels, wild asses, ibex, wolves, and snow leopards in one of the harshest environments on Earth. What has the Gobi Bear Project been learning about these bears? What do we really know about grizzly bears in general apart from centuries of tall tales and strong opinions about what we imagine them to be like? Chadwick, who studied mountain goat ecology and social behavior atop the Crown of the Continent for seven years, is a natural history journalist, producing 14 popular books and hundreds of magazine articles. Chadwick is a founding board member of the Vital Ground Foundation, a conservation land trust.


WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP SUMMIT
March 28, 2017 | 2-7 p.m.
Student Union

The Women’s Leadership Summit aims for women to feel more confident as leaders by helping them build valuable skills and support networks. The program will include a keynote speaker, program sessions, and the opportunity to network with others interested in supporting women’s leadership.

The theme of this year’s conference is “HER: Story Movement Life.” Women’s lives consist of choices, desires, decisions, needs, relationships, sacrifices, goals and attainment of those goals. Women’s lives are lived in the context of the times and the generations and are influenced by the social happenings and political climate.

Women’s lives are complex in our relationship with ourselves as well as our inclusion of others, family, children or community. We have dreams that drive us, and work and love that grounds us.

In short, women move in the moment and in movements of history throughout our lives.

Where are you in your life movement? How is your story shaped by the bigger movements in our time and culture? What are the choices, and desires and imaginative risks you have taken or sacrifices you have made to create the life you want?

What have you composed and completed in the past? What movement are you composing in your life now?

What’s your story?

For more information, click here. Registration closes March 24, 2017.


SOCIAL WORK CAREER PREP SERIES: NEGOTIATING FOR WHAT YOU DESERVE
Thursday, March 30, 2017 | 12-1 p.m.
Okazaki Community Meeting Room (155-A), College of Social Work


You polished your resume, nailed the interview, and the company just called you with an offer.  So, now what?  When discussing salary and benefits, how do you figure out what’s fair?  How do you keep negotiations open?  How do you ask for what you deserve?  Join our social work career coach from Career Services to learn best practices for successful negotiating.

This event is free and open to social work students and alumni.

Please direct inquires to Jennifer Nozawa: jennifer.nozawa@socwk.utah.edu.


RUN FOR YOUR LIFE 5K & COMMUNITY HEALTH FAIR

Saturday, April 8, 2017

Sugarhouse Park

We are proud to present the Run For Your Life 5K and Community Health Fair focused on diabetes education and awareness. We are striving to help our community implement healthy lifestyle changes to better manage and prevent his disease. University of Utah student pharmacists will be providing free health screenings, including blood glucose and blood pressure checks. We will also have counseling on immunizations and over-the-counter product information. There will be health fair booths specifically focused on health promotion to raise awareness on preventing and treating Type 2 diabetes.

Sign up here.


2017 NHMU LECTURE SERIES KEYNOTE
ANDREW ZIMMERN – FOOD: A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE STATE OF OUR FOOD LIFE
Tuesday, April 11, 2017 Ι 7 p.m.
Tickets available now

  • $12 for all ages
  • $6 with valid UCard

Must buy discount tickets in person at the Kingsbury Hall box office.

Click here to buy tickets online.

Join TV personality, chef, food writer, teacher, and three-time James Beard Award-winner Andrew Zimmern is widely regarded as one of the most versatile and knowledgeable personalities in the food world.

As the creator and host of Travel Channel’s multiple Bizarre Foods series, Zimmern travels the globe, exploring food and its terroir. Join Zimmern for a fascinating interpretation of the way we live our lives through food, and how we might better understand what and how we eat to make better choices for our futures.

This event will be held on Tuesday, April 11, 2017 at 7 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall.


FREE YOGA FROM JANUARY-APRIL 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Fridays | 8:05 a.m. 
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50 minute yoga sessions from January-April 2017 on Mondays, *Wednesdays and Fridays (beginning on Feb. 1), on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library.

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk.

Please send us feedback here.


‘UTAH RADIO RETROSPECTIVE’ | FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY ANNUAL SPRING BANQUET
Wednesday, April 12 Ι Reception at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m.
Crimson View Room (Level 4), Student Union

Speaker: Doug Wright, “The Doug Wright Show,” KSL Radio

Doug Wright of KSL Radio and television, a broadcast veteran of nearly 50 years, will share a historic review of Utah radio, with anecdotes and insights along with historic photos, sound clips and stories about the evolution of radio in Utah and the West. He will relate stories from his own personal experiences of interviewing many well-known celebrities, authors, politicians, and give insights into some of his most memorable broadcasting opportunities.

$50 per person

Contact Judy Jarrow for tickets by April 5. 801-581-3421 or judy.jarrow@utah.edu

Parking is free in the Alumni House lot. There is a charge for parking in the Union pay lots.


LIVE MUSEUM THEATER
Through April 15, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah

Don’t miss live theater performances delighting museum audiences almost daily. Current productions include “Poison Live!” – the true story of how murder helped bring about the science of toxicology, and “The Extreme Plants Traveling Sideshow,” a fun look at how exotic plants in the rainforest develop life-saving defenses.

Shows are included with regular museum admission.

“Poison Live!” is a 12-minute theatrical and multimedia show that tells a dramatic story about the beginnings of toxicology. Check here for scheduled days and times.

Extreme plants traveling show: Step right up and see the world’s most daring, elegant, exotic and mysterious plants. Experience this high-energy, 20-minute theatrical performance that will entertain and enlighten one and all. Meet the plants and bear witness to their highly evolved defense mechanisms. Seeing is believing folks. Check here for scheduled days and times.


THE POWER OF POISON
Through April 16, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah

goldendartfrog_amnh_t-grant-cropped
Mystery and intrigue are afoot at NHMU’s new “Power of Poison” exhibit. Learn more about the role of poison for good and ill in nature, history, myths and legends and real life. Complete with live animals, technical wonders and a touch of live theater, there is something to fascinate the explorer in everyone.

NHMU is the only stop on “The Power of Poison” tour that displays live animals. When visitors step into “Poison in Nature,” they enter the Chocó forest of Columbia where live golden poison arrow frogs peer up from their tanks. These brightly-colored amphibians can fit into your shirt pocket, but they would be a deadly accessory; their skin secretes a substance so toxic that the poison from one frog can kill 10 grown humans.

Purchase tickets here.


THE U’S TANNER HUMANITIES CENTER PRESENTS AN EVENING WITH SANDRA CISNEROS
Tuesday, April 25, 2017 Ι 7:30 p.m.
Tickets available now
ArtSaltLake.org or 801-355-ARTS (2787)

The Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah presents “An Evening with Sandra Cisneros” hosted by KUER’s Doug Fabrizio, producer and host of RadioWest, at Rose Wagner Performing Arts Center, April 25 at 7:30 p.m. The event is open to the public but tickets are required.

Tickets were made available Monday, Feb. 13, 10 a.m. at ArtSaltLake.org or 801-355-ARTS (2787). Limit is two per person. Cisneros will discuss the Chicana literary movement, her writing and the influence of her heritage on her work. She will read excerpts from her books, including her recent memoir “A House of My Own: Stories From My Life.”


FITNESS INSTRUCTOR TRAINING COURSE
Through Friday, April 28, 2017
Eccles Student Life Center
$80

Our in-house Fitness Instructor Training (FIT) course is your first step to teaching group fitness classes for Campus Recreation Services and inspiring active, healthy living. This course is a combination of lectures on ACE fundamentals and practical applications that will cover the basics of group exercise instruction including format options, anatomy, physiology, kinesiology, injury prevention, cueing and more.

Spring session will occur on Fridays, 2 p.m., March 3-April 28. Register here.

Contact the fitness manager with any questions at cflatley@crs.utah.edu.


THE SEARCH FOR LINCOLN: AVARD FAIRBANKS AND THE WORK OF A LIFETIME
Ongoing through Friday, May 5, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 1

The class of 1965-66 gifted the Marriott Library with one of Avard Fairbank’s famous sculptures of Abraham Lincoln. Titled “Young Lincoln,” it stands in the gallery on the first floor.  Last year, his son, Eugene Fairbanks donated his father’s manuscripts and photo collections to the library. The collection includes photos, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and research that are enough to cover the entire first floor gallery with the story of the Lincoln statue.