HUMANS OF THE U: JOEY MANTIA

“Words can’t really describe how it feels [to speedskate]. It’s one of those things you have to experience for yourself to know exactly the feeling that we’re having as we’re going through the turns – all the forces that are acting on the body at the same time. The closest thing I’ve found in my life is riding a motorcycle.

People look at a Michael Phelps or Lindsey Vonn and they see all the endorsements. The reality is a lot of us are amateurs. If you’re in the top three in the world consistently you’re making a good living, but it’s a pretty big fall off after that. The struggles of making money and setting yourself up for life after being an athlete are tough sometimes especially as you’re climbing the ranks.

Coffee Lab kind of fell in my lap. I wasn’t a coffee drinker. La Barba Coffee had a shop where we are now [in the Skaggs Pharmacy Research Building atrium] and Simon Zivny was working there. When they were moving shop the dean’s office, right next door, told Simon he should open up his own spot. My teammate at the time, Sugar Todd, was dating Simon. I heard her talking about it one day at practice and I asked if he needed some financial backing. I made the correlation between his passion for coffee and my passion for sport. We sat down and had a couple meetings and then Coffee Lab was born. And now I don’t like to race without drinking coffee. He introduced me to the world of good third-wave coffee and focusing on quality over knocking out drinks. We have a good partnership going where I keep him honest on business things and he keeps me honest on coffee things. We’ve been open a little over two years. We look forward to seeing where it goes.”

Joey Mantia, U.S. Olympic Speedskating Team, competed in 2014 and 2018 Winter Olymipcs, co-owner, Coffee Lab

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DRAINING BUCKETS

By Andrew Thompson Landerghini, University of Utah Communications

Thanks to an acrobatic bucket-making magician fresh out of the University of Louisville, and an entourage of tough and selfless teammates, the 2017-18 season was a special one for the Utah Jazz. However, the moves off the court are what made it extra special for one die-hard lifelong fan. Doug Wysocki a former high school teacher, basketball coach and Jazz season-ticket holder hadn’t attended a game since suffering a traumatic brain injury in 2014. But on April 5, he got a big assist from University of Utah Commencement 2018 speaker Ben Nemtin, who has made a career of fulfilling “bucket list” dreams, and received roundball treatment fit for an all-star.

As part of Nemtin’s commencement appearance, he wanted to do something for somebody that was special. The trick was finding that person. Through Occupational Therapy at University of Utah Health, where Wysocki is a client, coordinators with University Marketing & Communications (UMC) and the Board of Trustees learned of Wysocki’s story and of his winning and optimistic attitude despite the hardships he’s faced over the last four years. They contacted Wysocki’s daughter, Sara Jensen, who was instrumental in making sure that the occasion was a surprise and went off without a hitch.

What proceeded was magical and left thousands, whether they saw it at commencement or on their computers, phones or tablets, a little choked up.

The video, which was shown during Nemtin’s general commencement speech, and later posted to the U’s Facebook page, sparked an emotional response and was shared widely across the internet. More than 125,000 people watched then and garnered nearly 5,000 reactions on Facebook alone. It was even mentioned in a Deseret News article about what it takes to give a good graduation address.

The piece received a big boost when it was shared by the Utah Jazz Twitter and Facebook accounts. Of course, the entire evening couldn’t have happened without them in the first place.

“The Utah Jazz were such gracious partners,” said Shelly Christensen, an account executive with UMC who helped oversee the project. “They went above and beyond for us, catered to our needs, were super flexible and treated Doug like an all-star. They even made him his own custom jersey.”

The point guard, however, was the bucket-list bon vivant.

“Ben drove much of the experience that night,” Christensen said. “I was very impressed. He was very down to earth, enthusiastic, super approachable and warm. You can see that he genuinely wants to lighten the burden of others.”

And for one evening, he did just that. With teamwork from a classy organization and a loving family, Nemtin helped one super fan score a win.

CURBING OPIOID ADDICTION

By Melinda Rogers, media relations manager, S.J. Quinney College of Law

When University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law professor Teneille Brown presented research related to opioid addiction and legal issues to a group of county commissioners last fall, the atmosphere in the room could be summed up in one word: Desperate.

PHOTO CREDIT: University of Utah

U professor Tenielle Brown

“You could see the desperation from these county officials. It was, ‘We don’t know what to do. Our overdose rates are through the roof. Our medical examiners are quitting, because they are saying, we didn’t sign up for this, we are seeing so many 19-year-olds dead,’” said Brown describing an epidemic that is killing hundreds of Utahns each year.

As Brown listened to county officials from across Utah speak about the problems associated with opioid abuse and how it has crept into every corner of their communities, she saw potential for an educational opportunity in the midst of the conversation.

She brainstormed ideas for how to transfer the topic into her classroom and created a new seminar course at the U, The Opioid Crisis, which debuted at the law school this month at the start of the summer term.

The class approaches the subject of opioid addiction from a regulatory perspective. Students learn how gaps in laws, regulations and their enforcement, contributed to the opioid crisis while exploring how specific policy proposals could help curb the current crisis. They dig into issues such as physician conflicts of interest in over-prescribing opioids; how FDA approved OxyContin as “potentially less addictive” without adequate evidence, and the civil suits filed against manufacturers and physicians for the costs of dealing with the aftermath of these reckless practices; the difficulty going after “pill mill” distributors as DEA enforcement has been crippled; as well as public health responses and legislative efforts in Utah to reduce opioid overdose and addiction, including voluntary physician education and the mandatory tracking of prescriptions.

Outside of traditional legal coursework and readings, students have witnessed the face of the epidemic by visiting Odyssey House, an addiction, mental health and medical services program in Salt Lake City where they met individuals affected by opioid abuse and providers who are working to help them into recovery.  They have also learned from Christy Poruznik, a leading public health professor at the U, and Ray Ward, a state representative from Davis County, who has been on the frontlines battling the epidemic both clinically and legislatively.

Several students enrolled in the course say the innovative content will be useful to their future legal careers. The class is a mix of law students who envision working in the criminal justice system one day as either prosecutors of public defenders and others who hope to work in health law and public policy to facilitate change.

“Opioid addiction is a public health threat with thousands of individuals dying from opioid related causes. Personally, I have witnessed the impact addiction can have on families and communities. Generally, I am passionate about health care and my grad studies were in public health so it was a very easy choice to take this class,” said Carlos Quijada, a third-year law student.

U student Carlos Quijada.

“The opioid epidemic is only getting worse. Federal, state and local governments are in the middle of tackling this crisis through appropriate regulation. I would like to work in the health policy field. Through this class I will be better informed as to the causes and factors affecting opioid addiction in the U.S. and better prepared for a career in health policy,” added Quijada, who after the course will leave for a competitive and prestigious summer internship at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in Atlanta, an organization with a key role in working toward solutions for the current addiction problem.

Student Emily Mabey Swensen said the course will help to prepare her for a future as a prosecutor.

“I know people whose lives have been destroyed by these addictions. I also see that in criminal law, which is my area of interest, the opioid epidemic permeates every aspect of the system these days. From drug court to prosecution of robberies to justice court traffic offenses and domestic violence offenses, addiction plays a role in so many of the cases I’ve seen. The epidemic felt overwhelming to me and I wanted to understand how it came to be, and what any of us could possibly do to help once we get out there to practice law. I didn’t want to feel like it was hopeless,” said Swensen.

Brown’s opioid class is part of a broader initiative by the College of Law’s Center for Law and Biomedical Sciences to harness its health law expertise to address the epidemic.

The center, launched in 2015, is designed to offer resources and academic support on issues tied to improving the law as it relates to the rapidly evolving areas of health policy, the life sciences, biotechnology, bioethics and the medical and technological arts, in order to help overcome critical health care challenges.

Earlier this spring the center collaborated with the Honors College, and the Program in Medical Ethics and Humanities at the University of Utah School of Medicine to host a conversational summit on the opioid crisis in Utah. The summit aimed to develop coalitions between health care providers, public health agencies and the criminal justice community; to identify barriers to effective treatment of pain, addiction, and their aftermaths; and to begin to explore strategies that address such barriers.

During the 2018-2019 academic year, the conversation will continue with several events at the law school devoted to the topic of opioid abuse, including the Utah Law Review annual symposium on Nov. 30. The event, “The Opioid Crisis: Paths Forward to Mitigate Regulatory Failure,”  will further the discussion of the epidemic from a legal point of view. It is free and open to the public.

“We are uniquely positioned to bring together lawyers, public health professionals and a wide variety of health care professionals to address these issues. One of the major achievements of the conversational summit was the initiation of connections that we will be continuing in smaller groups — for example, between pharmacists, physicians and public health; or between prosecutors, defense attorneys, and health care providers,” said Leslie Francis, director of the center and a professor of law who is working with Brown on many of the educational components at the law school related to the opioid crisis.

The opioid epidemic in the U.S. and in Utah has received considerable attention in recent months and for good cause.  In 2016, there were 466 opioid-related overdose deaths­­­ in Utah — a rate of 16.4 deaths per 100,000 people and more than the national rate of 13.3 deaths per 100,000 people, according to the NIH’s National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Nationally, more than 63,600 people died as a result of drug overdoses in 2016, with most of those deaths attributed to painkillers such as heroin, fentanyl, oxycodone and hydrocodone, according to a recent report from the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Opioid addiction hits home for many people because those affected are often not “stereotypical” drug abusers, with many addictions spurring from a prescription given by a doctor for a back injury, dental work or other fairly routine medical problem, noted Brown.

Besides teaching, Brown will continue researching issues related to addiction and the law. Earlier this month, she traveled to St.George, Utah, where she presented at a judicial education conference to Utah appellate judges about character evidence, and the problems in the current rule of law given advances to the understanding of addiction.

Brown is well-suited to take on the task of addiction-related scholarship.  She holds a joint appointment at the U with the College of Law and the School of Medicine, where she focuses her research on legal and ethical implications of the biomedical sciences and health care.

Her expertise was tapped by Utah county commissioners last fall as a resource for counties considering filing a lawsuit against pharmaceutical companies accused of using misleading marketing tactics that have resulted in the country’s escalating opioid epidemic.

States including Texas, Florida, Nevada, North Carolina and North Dakota have filed cases in state court against Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of OxyContin. Similar legal cases by other states have been lodged against Endo Pharmaceuticals, the maker of the opioid painkiller Opana ER.

The legal battles are likely only to grow as overdose deaths continue, said Brown. And solutions to address the broader opioid crisis are as ubiquitous as the diverse population affected by addiction, with no one-size-fits-all approach available to help reverse the troubling trend.

Still, uniting the community in a research and scholarship capacity and focusing on the law’s role in the dilemma is a start, she said.

“I don’t think any of us have any delusions about solving this problem,” said Brown of opioid addiction as a societal issue. “But we can chip away at it and prevent future cases of addiction,” she said.

“The law is pretty powerful. It can enable problems, but it can also work to mitigate them. Having students think about a big problem but also how you can chip away at it — that’s valuable. The law can make a difference.”

JUMP START SUMMER

By University of Utah Communications

Summer is upon us, bringing longer days that need to be filled with fun outings, and of course, food. Get the most out of your summer by checking out some of the events happening around Salt Lake City and the surrounding areas this year.

‘Tis the season to enjoy the array of outdoor activities that Salt Lake City and Utah have to offer. Last year, we covered four hikes around the city that could be completed in under four hours. This year, we’re cranking up the trails and highlighting some of the best mountain bike rides near campus.

SHORELINE

The Bonneville Shoreline Trail is perfect for beginners, or someone just trying to get in a quick ride on a short time frame. Enter at the many points located between the Hogle Zoo and the Jewish Community Center, and ride for however long you desire. Temperatures could still be quite hot down in the valley, so make sure to grab your favorite mountain bike T-shirt to ride in.

Difficulty level: Beginner to intermediate riders.

BOBSLED

This trail, located right above the Block U, is a great trail that every student should know and ride. With the name of the trail resembling the berms that are throughout the entire length, a good time is sure to be had. There are even old cars that have been turned into jumps and drops.

Difficulty level: Intermediate to advanced riders.

I STREET

If you’re an air and/or adrenaline junkie, I Street is the destination for you. Located at the top of the Avenues neighborhood, local bikers have been building jumps and evolving the area for years. Whether you’re just learning to jump or trying to learn new tricks, there are features of every size for every rider.

Difficulty level: Intermediate to advanced riders.

WASATCH CREST TRAIL

Needing a car or setting up a shuttle is required to ride the Crest, but it is worth all the effort. With many options of where you end up, there is over 30 miles of beautiful single track at your fingertips. Make sure to go with someone who knows where they are going the first time, since finding your way can get a bit confusing. Bring a jacket or a mountain bike jersey, since in the fall it can get cold at high elevations.

Difficulty level: Intermediate to advanced riders.

 CORNER CANYON

The Corner Canyon trail system is on the south end of the valley in Draper. It features rolling and raucous rides for all levels under the watchful eye of Lone Peak with trails connecting to Alpine in neighboring Utah County.

Difficulty level: Beginner to Intermediate.

THE FOOD TRUCK LEAGUE
Various dates, times and locations

If you are looking for a locally made, one of a kind meal, check out thefoodtruckleague.com to track down where your food trucks will be this summer. The Food Truck League partners with over 100 of Utah’s best food trucks, so no matter what cuisine you are in the mood for, you can find it. The Food Truck League also coordinates hundreds of food truck round-ups, corporate lunches and private events.

Download their app on iOS and Android or visit thefoodtruckleague.com.

Food Truck Thursdays
Thursdays | 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Gallivan Avenue, 239 Main St.

Every Thursday, head to Gallivan Avenue for a round-up of Salt Lake City’s food trucks. Check out their Facebook page each week for a list of vendors participating that Thursday with new and favorite food trucks from around the state.

Friday Night Flicks
Friday nights June 1-July 13, 2018 | Booths open at 8 p.m., movie begins around 9:15 p.m.
Various SLC parks

Enjoy free family friendly movies and food trucks at various parks throughout the summer. This year’s theme is “Family Favorites That Are Out of This World.”

For a list of movies and locations, go here.

FOOD TRUCK FACE OFF
June 30, 2018 | 4-10 p.m.
Liberty Park, 600 E. 900 S.

Do good while having fun at Utah’s largest food truck rally for charity as over 30 local food trucks face off in the 4th annual Food Truck Face Off for Charity.

A portion of every ticket sold goes to support four local charities: Utah Community Action, Fourth Street Clinic, YWCA Utah and Volunteers of America-Utah.

Pre-order your meal tickets for $5 each or buy them at the event for $6 each. Redeem your tickets at the truck of your choice. Menu items will be priced in terms of 1-5 tickets with most meals costing between 2-4 tickets.

You can purchase tickets online here.

For more information, go here.

Utah Pride Festival and Parade
June 1-3, 2018
Parade: Sunday, June 3, 2018 | 10 a.m.
Admission: $10
Washington Square and Library Plaza

The Festival empowers the LGBTQ+ community of Salt Lake, as well as the state of Utah as a whole, to come together and celebrate. Pride Elevated 2018 is excited to offer additional celebratory events, extended festival hours, diversified food and business vendors, venue upgrades and even greater entertainment.

 juneteenth heritage festival & holiday observance
June 4, 2018
Gallivan Center

Juneteenth celebrates Utah’s African & African American history and culture and includes live entertainment from some of the state’s finest bands and artist, spoken word, poetry, ethnic cuisine, arts and crafts, business and resource vendors, health screening and games for all ages.

UTAH SCOTTISH FESTIVAL & HIGHLAND GAMES
June 8-10, 2018
Utah State Fairgrounds

With three days of heart-thumping competitions and foot-tapping entertainment, the 2018 Utah Scottish Festival is not to be missed. The festival will also feature piping competitions, dancing competitions and heavy athletics.

Festival hours:

  • Friday, June 8: 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.: Featuring A Tattoo at 7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday, June 9: 9am – 10 p.m.: Featuring opening ceremonies at 12 p.m. and a concert at 7 p.m.
  • Sunday, June 10: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.: Featuring a Kirkin’ ‘O the Tartan at 11a.m. and the closing ceremonies at 4 p.m.

For more information on scheduling please visit our website at utahscots.org. This year’s entertainment will feature festival favorites Molly’s Revenge, & the Wicked Tinkers. 

Ticket prices are $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and teens 12 – 18 years old. Children 11 and younger are free. Tickets will be good for the entire weekend. Pre-sale tickets are no longer on sale.

UTAH FOSTER CARE CHALK ART FESTIVAL
June 15-17, 2018
The Gateway,18 North Rio Grande Street

For 15 years, Utah Foster Care has presented this free community art event that turns Rio Grande Street into a gallery of vibrant street murals.

Events include Kids Korner packed with new activities, such as “The Foster Parent is In” booth and lots of art projects for kids.

WESTSIDE FESTIVAL
June 16, 2018 | 11 a.m.-9 p.m.
Sugar Space Arts Warehouse, 132 S 800 W Salt Lake City

Restore North Temple and the River District Chamber presents the 2018 Westside Festival. Art, food and music come together from across SLC’s west side communities and across the city. This event is free and kid friendly with activities and a bar garden for adults.

Art booths open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and entertainment from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. with local music phenomenon Changing Lanes headlining from 7-9 p.m.

Entertainment line-up and featured artists coming soon. Check here for updates.


Utah Arts Festival
June 21-24, 2018
Admission: $10-$12

Washington Square and Library Plaza

Enjoy everything that is art in Utah with music, food, artist booths, cultural performances and more.

SALT LAKE CITY TACO FEST
August 11, 2018 | 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Admission: $5
Mexican Civic Center, 155 S 600 W

The day will be filled with live entertainment, face painting, special giveaways and some of the region’s best taco-centric restaurants competing for Best Taco Awards in four different categories. All proceeds benefit Meals on Wheels.

PERUVIAN FESTIVAL
July 27-28, 2018
Library Square, 500 S. 300 E.

The biggest celebration among the Peruvian Community in Utah, a showcase of the best traditional Peruvian food, folklore, dances and international artists.

SALT LAKE CITY TACO FEST
Aug. 5, 2017
155 S. 600 West

We are excited to announce that Utah’s first annual Tacofest will be held Aug. 5, 2017, at the Mexican Civic Center. There will be live music, children’s activities, and the best tacos Utah has to offer.

We will be donating a part of the proceeds to Meals on Wheels to recognize their services to the community. This event is ALL AGES and will be free to the public.

CRAFT LAKE CITY
Aug. 10–12, 2018

Gallivan Plaza

The DIY Festival prides itself on presenting all things indigenous to the state from entertainment to craft food.

GREEK FESTIVAL
Sept. 7-10, 2018
Admission: $3

Holy Trinity Cathedral Greek Orthodox Church, 279 300 W, Salt Lake City

The Salt Lake City Greek Festival is considered to be one of the finest cultural events in Utah and is the largest Greek festival of the western United States. Enjoy the food, dance and culture of Greece at the Salt Lake Greek Festival hosted by the Greek Orthodox Community of Greater Salt Lake.

UTAH STATE FAIR
Sept. 6-16, 2018
Utah State Fair Park, 155 N 1000 West

The Utah State Fair promotes Utah and its products with events by the Utah Dairy Council, Utah Beef Council, Utah Wool Growers Association and the Utah Farm Bureau. “Utah’s Own” Food Court features locally grown and prepared foods from around the state. The Utah State Fair strives to blend the best of Utah tradition and heritage with new technology and modern ideals.

9th and 9th Street Fair
Sept. 15, 2018| 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
900 S. 900 E.

Held at the intersection of 900 South and 900 East in Salt Lake City, the 9th and 9th Street Festival has become an annual event where everyone from the city converges to enjoy food, fun and music.

Fourth of July Celebration
July 4, 2018 | 10 p.m.
Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, Salt Lake City

July 4, 2017, at 10 p.m. Salt Lake City’s annual 4th of July celebration will celebrate Independence Day in style with FIREWORKS. As always it will be a patriotic neighborhood party on Salt Lake City’s west-side. The firework display will be located near the north part of Jordan Park. Go here for more info.

*This event may be canceled this year. Check local news for updates*

SALT LAKE BEES GAMES
Various dates
Smith’s Ballpark

Join the Salt Lake Bee’s in May, June and July for fireworks after the game. Click here for a list of all promotional games and to see the fireworks schedule.

SLC’S ANNUAL FIREWORKS SHOW
July 24, 2018 | 10 p.m.
Liberty Park/Herman Franks Park

Join us for Salt Lake City’s annual Firework Show at Herman Franks Park near Liberty Park.  Bring a blanket and chairs and enjoy the firework display that will be located in the center of Herman Franks Park.

FAMILY FLICKS
Fridays, June 22-Aug. 10, 2018
Snowbird

Free movies every Friday on the Snowbird Center Plaza Deck at dusk (approx. 30 minutes after sunset). Lawn chairs and coolers welcome. The Birdfeeder will be open, selling popcorn, cotton candy, frozen cheesecake, root beer floats and more.

A list of movies and dates can be found here.

Monday Night Movies
Mondays, July 9-30, 2018 | Approximately 9 p.m.
Gallivan Center Plaza

Thrills…Chills…and Aliens!?! Free movies during the month of July in downtown Salt Lake at the Gallivan Center. Enjoy classic 70s disaster films as they were meant to be seen: Outdoors and under the stars. Movies start at dusk. Low back chairs, blankets, pillows and food are allowed. Gallivan Eats, the Gallivan Center’s concessions stand will be open for snacks.

Click here for dates and list of movies.

Friday Night Flicks — SALT LAKE CITY
Friday nights June 1-July 13, 2018 | Opens at 7:30 p.m.; movie begins around 9 p.m.
Various Salt Lake City parks

Family favorites that are out of this world. Free family friendly movies at different Salt Lake City parks each week will be shown on a large inflatable screen with free popcorn. Bring your blankets and chairs and enjoy a neighborhood party under the stars.

Plus, the Food Truck League will be at each movie and food will be available to purchase on site.

For a list of movies and locations, go here.

MOVIES IN THE PARK — MURRAY
Specific Saturdays and Fridays June 2-Aug. 3, 2018 | 9 p.m.
Various locations in Murray

Family friendly movies outdoors. Picnics are encouraged. Food options available for purchase at the onsite food trucks. Blankets and lawn chairs allowed. No dogs allowed.

For a list of movies and locations, go here.

FAMILY NIGHT SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT AND BLOCKBUSTER MOVIES — DRAPER
Friday, June 15 and Thursday, July 12, 2018 | Pre-movie entertainment at 8 p.m.; movie begins at 9:15 p.m.
Draper Amphitheater, 944 E. Vestry Road, Draper

Giant 32-foot screen with terraced grass seating. Bring blankets, lawn chairs and snacks. Concessions are available: hot dogs, drinks, ice cream, popcorn and candy.

All summer movies and pre-movie entertainment are free. Show up early, get a good seat and listen to some great, live music.

For a list of movies and locations, go here.

MOVIES IN THE PARK — SANDY
Fridays, June 15-Aug. 3, 2018 | At dusk (approx. 9 p.m.)
Various Sandy city parks

Come join Sandy city in filling the summer with awesome movies. All movies start at dusk. Popcorn, candy and drinks will be sold for $1. Bring family, friends, blankets and chairs.

For a list of movies and locations, go here.

MOVIES IN THE PARK AND FOOD TRUCK FRENZY— RIVERTON
Fridays, July 13-Aug. 24, 2018 | At dusk (approx. 9 p.m.)
Riverton City Park

Food, fun and a free movie the entire family will love. With a trio of events, Home, Hand & Harvest Market, Food Truck Frenzy and the movies will prove to be a spectacular evening. Bring your blankets and join us on the event lawn at the Riverton City Park beginning at 6 p.m. when a variety of food truck vendors and market vendors will be on hand for a tasty meal and products to browse before the movie.

For a list of movies and locations, go here.

Red Butte Garden Outdoor Concert Series
May-September
Admission: Varies
Red Butte Amphitheatre

Grab your picnic basket and blanket and head over to the gorgeous Red Butte Garden Amphitheater for an eclectic lineup of musical artists from Ryan Adams to The Counting Crows, The Avett Brothers to Indigo Girls.

OGDEN TWILIGHT CONCERT SERIES
Every Thursday night in June

Admission: $5-$10
Ogden Amphitheater

Come see an incredible lineup of artists from the Flaming Lips to Chromeo.

HEART & SOUL MUSIC STROLL
June 9, 2018 | 3-8 p.m.
Admission: Free
Filmore and Glenmore streets between 2700 South and Zenith Ave.

Local bands will be bringing their talents to the streets of the greater Salt Lake community, playing from neighborhood porches and yards. A free community event, enjoy an afternoon strolling from house to house, yard to yard, band to band, through the tree-lined streets of a Salt Lake neighborhood. Click here for more info.

UTAH BLUES FESTIVAL
June 16, 2018

Admission: Varies
Gallivan Center Plaza

The festival connects people to a musical genre that has used the American experience as its voice: the Blues. Showcasing national and local Blues artists, as well as a youth showcase and workshops, the Utah Blues Festival has something for everyone. 

Twilight Concert Series
Thursdays starting July 20, 2017 | Gates open at 5 p.m.
Admission: Varies

Gallivan Center

The 2018 series returns to The Gallivan Center. Artist line up to be announced soon. All shows will have a national act and one local act.

SLC Jazz Festival
July 6-7, 2018
Admission: $10
Gallivan Center

The Salt Lake City Jazz Festival is the premier jazz festival in Utah. Since 2001, the festival has featured some of the best jazz and musical guests that have delighted visitors throughout the Wasatch front and beyond.

Gallivan Center Lunch Bunch Concerts
Weekdays May-September | 12-1 p.m.
Gallivan Center

These lunch time concerts feature some of Salt Lake’s best local musical talent.

Snowbird Cool Air Concerts
Every Saturday from June 16-Aug. 11, 2018 | 6-9 p.m.
Admission: Free
Snowbird Plaza Deck

Pack a picnic and head up to the outdoor concerts at Snowbird featuring top bands from around the nation.

Note that all outdoor markets are accessible via public transportation.

Downtown Farmer’s Market
Saturdays June 9-Oct. 20, 2018 | 8 a.m.-2 p.m.

Pioneer Park

The Downtown Farmers Market is proud to enter its 27th year as Salt Lake City’s most beloved summer tradition for residents and visitors.

The Downtown Farmers Market exists to strengthen and support small local farms and businesses as they bring their products directly to the public. Our farmers and producers offer the freshest local fruits and vegetables as well as a wide variety of grass-fed meats, eggs, dairy, honey and flora, along with the region’s best locally made sauces, spreads, baked goods and culinary accouterments. Easily accessible via TRAX.

Liberty Park Farmer’s Market
Fridays June-October | 4 p.m. to dusk
Liberty Park

The Farmer’s Market is held at a beautiful park in Salt Lake City on Friday evenings.  The Liberty Park Farmers Market helps support local farms and businesses by bringing fresh local produce directly to the Liberty Wells community.

The Liberty Wells Community Council is a nonprofit organization made of all volunteers that identified a need for fresh local produce in the Liberty Wells area. The Community Council wanted to create an ongoing event to bring neighbors together to help strengthen the community and support local farms and business.

The Market has been very successful, with 40-50 vendors and hundreds of patrons each week.  Additionally, the Market was approved to accept Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Electronic Benefit Transfer (EBT).

9th West Farmers Market
Sundays June-October | 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
International Peace Gardens, 1000 S. 900 W.

Visit with local artisans, enjoy fresh prepared food, purchase some of the best produce to be found locally, and enjoy the live performances by local musicians. There are different special events throughout the season, including Book Day where you can swap books with others at the market, and Pet Day when we promote the many rescue organizations who bring out wonderful animals who are in need of good homes. We also promote the talented youth of the community to come: to learn arts and crafts, sell items that they have made themselves, or even perform musically during open mic sessions at the market.

URBAN FLEA MARKET 
Select Sundays May-October | 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
The Gateway, 12 S. Rio Grande Street, Salt Lake City

The Urban Flea Market is a year-round market that offers the opportunity to shop, browse and enjoy the experience of a Sunday in downtown Salt Lake City. It also provides a great community outlet for vendors to sell items that will be treasures for others.

$2 admission per person. Kids under 12 are free. Free parking in The Gateway ‘NORTH’ parking garage at 100 South 400 West. Plenty of free parking on surrounding neighborhood streets.

AFFORDABLE HOUSING

By Ashley Babbitt, University of Utah College of Architecture + Planning

Design+Build Salt Lake is a newly formed partnership, program and immersive experience where University of Utah School of Architecture students will develop, design and construct affordable, energy efficient residential buildings – from the first sketch to the final construction – along local neighborhoods.

“Designing a building is one thing, transforming the design into a real and resilient building that is affordable is a very different challenge though,” said Jörg Rügemer, director of the program and associate professor of architecture. “This program offers participants the opportunity to explore the consequences of their ideas in direct relation to the build environment, social equity, global climate change, and feasibility, where each step has to withstand the critical arguments of a real client.”

As part of a design studio, taught in combination with architecture history and architecture technology courses, students have already completed the process of subdividing a city-owned piece of land – roughly 20,000-square feet – into three individual lots with high-performance houses at an affordable cost designed for each parcel.

“We have teamed up with Salt Lake City’s Housing and Neighborhood Development department to design, develop and build the Montgomery Triplets – three 1,500-square-foot single-family residences on a vacant lot in Poplar Grove in west Salt Lake,” said Rügemer. “The other program partner, Salt Lake Valley Habitat for Humanity, will play a vital role in the realization of the studio projects.

School of Architecture research assistants are working to support HAND and Rügemer to secure a planned development and building permit in order to begin construction next summer. Habitat’s professional contractor will become the team’s supervisor.

“Design+Build Salt Lake is an important partnership that will encourage the next generation of housing innovations,” said J. Todd Reeder, capital asset development manager at HAND, Department of Community and Neighborhoods, Salt Lake City Corporation. “Taking small and odd shaped lots from the city inventory and envisioning innovative housing solutions will not only improve access to housing opportunities, but will also advance design standards in the community,”

SWEATING THE SMALL STUFF

By Karren Fultz, administrative officer, Sustainability Office

With over 27,000 employees at the university, small changes to our daily office habits can add up to a large collective impact. These can be seen in continual cost-savings and environmental benefits. The Sustainability Office offers ongoing support and customized training to help implement new practices. So, reimagine your office routine through Green Office Certification.

Green Office Certification is a tool that guides staff and faculty as they adopt sustainable choices in the workplace. Using the Green Office Checklist, departments and colleges provide opportunities for everyone to participate in sustainability activities related to purchasing, energy use, transportation and more. After completing the checklist, schedule an appointment with a green-office specialist to verify the level of certification.

“Green Office Certification has helped our office be more aware of our collective carbon footprint,” said Jennifer Browning, office assistant, College of Architecture + Planning. “Maintaining our gold standard has become a group effort with everyone involved. Because of this program, we are always trying to think of new ways to reduce, reuse and recycle here in our office. We are so grateful to the Sustainability Office for introducing us to this campus program.”

Participating departments are recognized in three tiers of achievement: bronze, silver and gold.

Five departments have achieved gold, three have silver and three have bronze. Additionally, 22 departments are working on their certification.

Gold: Bennion Center, College of Architecture + Planning Dean’s Office, Office of Sponsored Projects, Second Language Teaching & Research Center, Sustainability Office

Silver: City & Metropolitan Planning, Facilities Management Utility Systems & Services, Utah Museum of Fine Arts

Bronze: College of Humanities Dean’s Office, Eccles Health Sciences Library, Parks, Recreation & Tourism

The first office at the U to participate in Green Office Certification was the Bennion Center.

“Green Office Certification is about planning ahead and knowing what you really do or do not need,” said Debbie Hair, administrative assistant with the Bennion Center. “It is about remembering to use on/off switches, printing on both sides of paper, and other simple actions that give back to Earth.”

After earning bronze, the Bennion Center didn’t stop there, advancing to gold certification in February 2015. With this achievement, they joined the dean’s office in the College of Architecture + Planning, which was the first campus office to earn gold.

The Sustainability Office also uses Green Office Certification to collect data for the Association for Advancement in Higher Education’s Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS). Through this self-reporting system, universities and colleges measure their overall sustainability performance. The U is currently designated STARS Silver and working to achieve STARS Gold by 2020.

Ready to take action? Join the faculty and staff of 33 departments and colleges by registering your department today. Contact Karren Fultz, karren.fultz@utah.edu for more information.

Students supporting sobriety

The U’s student recovery program has done something no other collegiate recovery program has accomplished: This past spring, the Recover @ the U leadership team and faculty advisor Jason Castillo, along with Utah Rep. Mark Wheatley, lobbied for and were awarded annual funding from the Utah Legislature.

The program received $100,000 in ongoing funds for the program. The leadership team has exciting plans for the funding they’ve received, including acquiring and furnishing a drop-in center for ongoing support, continued training and development, staff support and scholarships for students in recovery.

By Stephanie Dawson Pack, public relations/marketing assistant, College of Social Work

At some point, many people who misuse alcohol or drugs are hit with the forceful impact of compulsive use, unware of when and how they passed that invisible line between ”recreational use” and ”addiction.”  Research shows that approximately 40 percent to 60 percent of people with a substance use disorder will relapse within a year of treatment — stuck in a space of knowing their habit is out of control, yet unable to stop using.

Recovery can feel like a lonely road. Often, it’s a struggle. Depending on one’s circumstances, a struggle to find housing; a struggle to find a job; a struggle to stay in school; a struggle to find a support group. Due to public health and safety laws regarding the use of particular substances, drug misuse is often tied to a criminal record. The presence of a criminal record is reason enough for many employers, landlords, and admissions officers to disqualify applicants.

Additionally, according to SAMHSA, millions of adults have co-occurring disorders — battling a mental health disorder along with their substance use disorder — which adds additional challenges. Addiction is also largely misunderstood within society, and people in recovery have a multitude of negative stereotypes and stigmas they’re forced to confront. Making new connections in the face of these stigmas can be daunting, but going back to familiar people and places might trigger a relapse. One MSW student described her experience this way:

Reentering society after being in treatment was exciting, but also terrifying. I was paranoid for the first little bit, afraid that I would get in a sticky situation that will lead me back to my old lifestyle. When going back to school, I hadn’t anticipated how much stress I would actually endure working a full-time job and attending classes full time. The stress alone was triggering. Because no one on campus knew me at first, the university felt like an unsafe space to be in. I experienced a lapse in judgment once while going to school, which left me feeling ashamed and guilty. If it weren’t for the other students in recovery and in my recovery community, I could have let that lapse in judgment become a much more serious situation. Individuals in recovery are strong, we endure a lot, we have experienced a lot of pain, growth and triumph. We, however, have a lot more to be aware of when going back to school or being fresh out of rehab. 

This is why surrounding oneself with communities of support is so vital to the recovery process. Support groups exist primarily to let those in recovery know they are not alone; there are others fighting the same battle.

And this is why Recover @ the U started. Students in recovery felt a gap in their recovery efforts. In a student-led effort, supported by the College of Social Work, students came together and acquired funding to create a community of support. Since Recover @ the U’s creation in 2015, their community has grown from a handful of students to more than a hundred students and allies, filling a critical need on campus. A big part of their work is challenging the narratives that surround what it means to be a person in recovery.

Former Recover @ the U president and participant Jessica said, “When we began Recover @ the U, many students didn’t want others knowing they were in recovery. Even the ones I knew who were [in recovery] didn’t think it would be good for their futures to identify that way. I found that to be very disappointing but continued doing the work.”

The variety of activities these students sponsor is extensive. In addition to two to three weekly meetings (held at different times during the day in an effort to accommodate as many schedules as possible), the students host sober tailgate parties and frequent socials, present to student and faculty groups across campus, host and lead education sessions at local treatment centers and attend and present research at conferences to spread awareness of their presence at the U.  All this, in many cases, in addition to going to school, holding a job and maintaining a family.

Why do they do it? Jason Castillo, Recover @ the U’s faculty advisor, believes it’s because of their commitment to sobriety.

“They want the community of substance abuse practitioners, advocates, directors, and persons in recovery to know, ‘You can go to the University of Utah and there is an environment there that will lend itself to recovery,’” he said. “We have a mission here at the U not just of educating students, but providing an environment committed to the health and well-being of our students.”

Justin, a student leader and Recover @ the U participant, said the program has been essential to maintaining his sobriety.

“As a full-time student and being on the campus nearly every day for hours at a time, I needed a safe place where I could get support,” Justin said. “I needed to have sober student support on campus. I found safety around students that had the same goals as me — staying sober, having a good time on campus, and living the college experience.”

 

 

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Walk with pride
Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018
Nominate a veteran


WALK WITH PRIDE

The University of Utah is showing its PRIDE for our LGBTQI community by entering a float into the Pride Festival Parade Sunday, June 3, 2018. Through word of mouth alone, a large number of people have shown interest. We want to continue that momentum and formally ask for more people to participate. Registration is required and spots are limited. A one-of-a-kind shirt has been made for the occasion so sign up early here.


Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018

On July 17, 2018, Duo phone call and text message options for two-factor authentication (2FA) will be discontinued. Users need to select another method for Duo 2FA to log in to the majority of university applications after July 17.

The Strategic Information Technology Committee approved this decision for a number of reasons – most importantly, recent industry guidance and practice has indicated that phone calls and text messages are vulnerable and not considered secure methods of authentication. There is also a significant cost associated with providing these authentication methods. The phone call option was intended to be a backup or emergency method for using Duo, yet for many it has become their primary method. The new backup option for Duo authentication will now be completed through the central university help desks (contact information below).

You may choose one of the following options for 2FA, which are used by the majority of campus and U Health users:

Duo mobile app:

  • Easiest and fastest method
  • Install on a smartphone or tablet (includes Apple, Android, and Windows mobile devices)
  • Two options to authenticate:
    1. Mobile push notification (select “approve” or “deny” from your device’s home screen or Duo notification page — no need to type in a code)
    2. Type in a passcode (network connectivity is not required for this option)

Duo hardware token:

Visit the 2FA webpage, Duo 2FA overview article, and Duo tutorial video found in Pulse (U Health) or Bridge (campus) for more information. If you have questions, contact the UIT Help Desk (801-581-4000, option 1) or ITS Service Desk (801-587-6000) for assistance.


Nominate a Veteran

The University of Utah Veterans Day Committee honors veterans each year based on their honor, courage, commitment and sacrifice during their military service to our nation. Nominations for this year’s ceremony are due by July 31, 2018.

For more information or to nominate a veteran to be honored, go to veteransday.utah.edu or call 801-587-7722.


 

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Walk with pride
Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018
Nominate a veteran


WALK WITH PRIDE

The University of Utah is showing its PRIDE for our LGBTQI community by entering a float into the Pride Festival Parade Sunday, June 3, 2018. Through word of mouth alone, a large number of people have shown interest. We want to continue that momentum and formally ask for more people to participate. Registration is required and spots are limited. A one-of-a-kind shirt has been made for the occasion so sign up early here.


Duo 2FA phone call, text options will be discontinued July 17, 2018

On July 17, 2018, Duo phone call and text message options for two-factor authentication (2FA) will be discontinued. Users need to select another method for Duo 2FA to log in to the majority of university applications after July 17.

The Strategic Information Technology Committee approved this decision for a number of reasons – most importantly, recent industry guidance and practice has indicated that phone calls and text messages are vulnerable and not considered secure methods of authentication. There is also a significant cost associated with providing these authentication methods. The phone call option was intended to be a backup or emergency method for using Duo, yet for many it has become their primary method. The new backup option for Duo authentication will now be completed through the central university help desks (contact information below).

You may choose one of the following options for 2FA, which are used by the majority of campus and U Health users:

Duo mobile app:

  • Easiest and fastest method
  • Install on a smartphone or tablet (includes Apple, Android, and Windows mobile devices)
  • Two options to authenticate:
    1. Mobile push notification (select “approve” or “deny” from your device’s home screen or Duo notification page — no need to type in a code)
    2. Type in a passcode (network connectivity is not required for this option)

Duo hardware token:

Visit the 2FA webpage, Duo 2FA overview article, and Duo tutorial video found in Pulse (U Health) or Bridge (campus) for more information. If you have questions, contact the UIT Help Desk (801-581-4000, option 1) or ITS Service Desk (801-587-6000) for assistance.


Nominate a Veteran

The University of Utah Veterans Day Committee honors veterans each year based on their honor, courage, commitment and sacrifice during their military service to our nation. Nominations for this year’s ceremony are due by July 31, 2018.

For more information or to nominate a veteran to be honored, go to veteransday.utah.edu or call 801-587-7722.