Paleontology procures the prize

The 2018 Linda K. Amos award was presented to Carolyn (Carrie) Levitt-Bussian collections manager of paleontology at the Natural History Museum of Utah. The award was presented on March 2, 2018, by Kathryn Bond Stockton, associate vice president for Equity and Diversity and Lauren Clark, professor in the College of Nursing, who represented the Linda K. Amos Award Subcommittee of the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women.

“I’m very, very honored and never expected to receive an award like this for the work I do in paleontology,” said Levitt-Bussian. “To me, I’m just doing my job. I don’t feel like I’m going above and beyond, I’m just doing the job I love. I like to spend time taking people on behind-the-scenes tours, and teaching during job shadows and internships. It’s an amazing honor to receive this for continuing to improve the educational and working environment for women.”

Levitt-Bussian, in addition to being the collections manager of paleontology at the NHMU, is a full-time mentor. She offers college students a hands-on internship where participants get real lab and curation experiences handling fossils. In fact, three of her student interns actually decided to change their majors and pursue a science degree after their experiences. She also offers job shadowing to young people and mentors the museum’s many volunteers.

“I have seen Carrie approached by young girls who are beyond excited to meet a real, live, woman paleontologist,” said nominator Catherine Webb. “Carrie not only advocates for the women immediately around her, but she recognizes her place and responsibility as a role model.”

“Paleontology has been and still is a male dominated field and it’s not common  to find a female in the lab and field. The perception is that women can’t lift as much or wield a jack hammer and use a rock saw with precision. I love working in the field and changing perceptions especially with the interesting challenges that come along with field work. I love to show young women that paleontology is fun, interesting and they can find a future in this field,” said Levitt-Bussian.

As a child, Levitt-Bussian was strongly influenced by a visit to The Mammoth Site in Hot Springs, South Dakota. The site paleontologist, Dr. Larry Agenbroad, took the time to answer all of her young questions about fossils and mammoths and told her to contact him if she had any more. She did, and he replied. A few years later, after many letters back and forth, due to her clear passion for this field, she was invited by Agenbroad on her first dig.

“At the age of 12, I immediately knew what I wanted to be when I grew up. Because someone took the time share their passion for paleontology with me and invest in my education by continually answering my many questions, I found my passion for paleontology,” said Levitt-Bussian.  “I try to pay it forward whenever I teach a new group of kids visiting the museum.”

Levitt-Bussian has also been turned into a cartoon character for the museum’s interactive, educational program “Research Quest.” Cartoon Carrie walks students through the critical thinking process to find clues, create a hypothesis and verify their findings in order to prove it right or wrong.

Since her appointment in 2013, Levitt-Bussian has expertly cared for the museum’s vast paleontology collection, empowering the crew of volunteers along the way. She teaches them about the many aspects of collections so they can teach others during the museum’s annual public events such as the ‘Behind the Scenes’ and ‘DinoFest weekend.

If you know of someone who should be considered for the Linda K. Amos award, click here for full nomination details.

STAY ON TRACK

Please be aware of changes that will affect anyone using UTA to commute to and from work.

UTA is changing its schedules on April 8, 2018.

Due to the implementation of federally-mandated Positive Train Control (safety measures established by the U.S. Department of Transportation) requirements on its commuter rail system, UTA will be adjusting its FrontRunner schedule. This change requires UTA to make scheduling adjustments throughout its system in order to preserve connections and transfers. As a result, all TRAX schedules and nearly all bus schedules will be adjusted starting April 8.

More information is available here. In addition, UTA’s Trip Planner and Customer Service department are available to assist you in planning your trip so that you can be prepared to get where you need to go when the changes take effect.

Click here to see a pdf of all changes.

Here’s everything you need to know about the upcoming change day:

Where can see if my route is changing?

Check UTA’s change day schedule or see UTA’s change day details page. Changes will be available individual route pages. Change day information will be listed in the upper right hand corner of each route page.

When will changes take place?

Changes will be implemented on Sunday, April 8, 2018.

Why are so many routes changing?

UTA is implementing Positive Train Control (PTC). This federally-required safety system ensures that trains stop at designated locations and prevents them from reaching excessive speeds or entering unauthorized portions of track. Implementing PTC means that it will take FrontRunner slightly more time to travel between Provo and Ogden. Schedules for most bus routes and all three TRAX lines will change to ensure that they still coordinate with FrontRunner schedules.

How do I get help figuring out the new schedules or planning a trip?

Contact UTA on Twitter, at @RideUTA or by calling customer service at 801-RIDE-UTA (743-3882). UTA’s happy to explain their new schedules and help you plan your trip.

FrontRunner Changes

Schedules will change to accommodate the new Positive Train Control system. Click here for details.

TRAX/S-Line Changes

Schedules for all three TRAX lines will change to improve reliability and align with new FrontRunner schedules. The S-Line’s schedule will not change. Click here for details.

Weber, Davis and Box Elder County Changes

Routes 455473603604612613616625626627630650 and 667 are changing to align with new TRAX and FrontRunner schedules. Due to low ridership, route 630’s 6:35 a.m. southbound trip will now end service at the Ogden Transit Center and will no longer serve Weber State University. Route 470 will serve the Lagoon Campground on Sundays and Ogden’s Midtown Clinic on Saturdays and Sundays. Weber and Davis county ski service will end April 1. Click here to see a full list of changes.

Salt Lake County Changes

Routes 22X361121333535M39414547546272200201205213217220227228232240248500513516519520525526 and 551 are changing to align with new TRAX and FrontRunner schedules. Route 21 will add a westbound evening trip, route 209 will add a northbound morning trip and eliminate a northbound evening trip, and route 307 has been shorted. Click here to see a full list of changes.

Utah County Changes

Routes 809821830838 and 850 will change to align with the FrontRunner schedule. Routes 805806807831841 and 862 will also change to align with FrontRunner as well as help alleviate congestion at Utah Valley University. Route 811 will change to align with TRAX connections. A trip will be eliminated from route 833, and route 834 will extended service to the Orem City Center. Route 840 will end service for the summer after UVU finals conclude. Route 863 will change to accommodate the FrontRunner schedule and serve a new area, and route 864 will offer new service west of Thanksgiving Point. Click here to see a full list of changes.

Ski Service

Routes 674 and 675 to Powder Mountain and Snowbasin will end service for the season on April 1. Route 880 to Sundance will end service on March 31. Big and Little Cottonwood Canyon routes will end service on April 7. Click here to see a full list of changes.

Flex Routes

Routes F94F504F518F522F546F547F570F578 will be adjusted to align with new TRAX schedules. F618 will now serve the Lantern House facility in Ogden. Click here to see a full list of changes.

PC-SLC Changes

Route 901 will be discontinued for the season. Weekend service will end on route 902, and the route will have minor schedule adjustments. Click here to see a full list of changes.

 

BINGE WORTHY

By Chris Nelson, University Communications

Forget Netflix originals and YouTube cat videos, if you’re looking for your next binge-watching marathon the University’s Marketing & Communication (UMC) team has you covered. The office recently hosted a campus film festival to show the best of its video production work over the past year – 36 short films you can watch via this link.

The films were produced on behalf of campus entities to help tell the stories of people and programs from across campus. The short features included stories on student housing, Utah Esports, the value of getting a humanities degree, and why you might not want to take personal advice from first-year students.

“We have worked hard over the past few years to recruit some of the best creative talent in Salt Lake City to our team. Local advertising agencies are taking notice, our in-house ability to produce top-notch video content is as good as you’d find at any local agency,” according to Jeff Bagley, UMC’s creative director. Bagley points to the 10 awards received by the office in 2017 from the University & College Designers Association (the most UCDA awards than any other university or college in the nation for the year).

While the office has plenty of work on its hands, Bagley says the team is always ready to meet with campus clients to discuss and brainstorm new projects. To learn more about the team’s capabilities and to schedule a consultation, contact Jeff Hanson, UMC’s executive producer at 801-581-7509 or via email at jeff.hanson@utah.edu.

Sexual Assault Awareness Month

By the Center for Student Wellness

The University of Utah recognizes Sexual Assault Awareness Month this April with a series of events highlighting the history and culture of sexual violence and educating, raising awareness and rejuvenating prevention efforts.

This month’s theme is “Beyond Words,” which illustrates the need and readiness for action against sexual violence. This theme aims to acknowledge those who choose to share their stories, while also honoring victim-survivors who may choose to remain silent.

The following events are scheduled throughout April. Contact wellness@sa.utah.edu with any questions you may have.

 U Sexual Assault Awareness Month 2018 Events: #SafeU
*We strive to provide event locations near gender-free restrooms. 

Kickoff
March 29, 2018 | 10 a.m.-2p.m.

Student Union Lobby

Join us for some photo booth fun, showcase your support for survivors and share how you go beyond words in the fight against sexual violence, all while learning about the month’s events.

Speak About It
April 3, 2-4 p.m.

Student Union Theatre

Speak About It” is a performance-based presentation about consent and boundaries and promotes healthy relationships through addressing issues of consent, sexual assault and bystander intervention. Refreshments to follow presentation. 

Take Back the Night
April 5, 6-8 p.m.
Presidents Circle to Westminster College Bassis Lounge

Join Students for Choice at the U and Westminster College in marching to end sexual violence in all its forms. Come early to get a free Take Back the Night T-shirt. Lyft promotion codes and rides will be available during and after the march. Food, spoken word, artivism and open mic to follow march. 

Hinckley Pizza & Politics Forum
April 11, 12-1 p.m.
Hinckley Caucus Room (Building 73, Room 110)

How can our community go beyond words to fight against sexual violence? Hear from panelists as they discuss their role in sexual assault awareness, prevention and response considering our current climate and the inherent divisive nature of this topic. Panelists include Nubia Pena, Rob Butters and Rep. Angela Romero. The panel will be moderated by Billy Palmer of RadioActive & NeighborWorks.

Coffee with Cops 
April 18, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. 

Enjoy a coffee and donut while learning about the Start By Believing Campaign and meeting with campus police, interpersonal violence victim support advocates and other survivor-centered community resources.

Sexual Assault Awareness Month activities on the University of Utah campus are sponsored by the Rape Recovery Center and the U’s Center for Student Wellness, Associated Students of the University of Utah, Housing and Residential Education, the Women’s Enrollment Initiative, the LGBT Resource Center, the Office of the Dean of Students and University Department of Public Safety.

HILL LEAVES A LEGACY

By University of Utah Athletics

Chris Hill announced that he plans to retire this spring, closing the book on a remarkable 31-year run as the athletics director at the University of Utah. Hill is the longest actively tenured athletics director at the same school in the NCAA FBS.

“Chris Hill leaves a tremendous legacy at the University of Utah,” said University of Utah President Ruth V. Watkins. “Chris has embodied all the traits needed to build a successful program: a student advocate, a skilled negotiator, a solid administrator with a keen eye for talent, an excellent fundraiser and a passionate sports fan. His leadership and relentless drive to raise the caliber and quality of our athletic programs over his 31-year career helped earn the university an invitation to join the Pac-12 Conference — a milestone that has proven to be transformational for our entire campus.

“Chris leaves us a vibrant, thriving athletics department that benefits student-athletes and our community. He has set the foundation for our continued success. On behalf of the entire university community, I thank him for his service and dedication to this institution and its students. I wish Chris the very best in retirement and look forward to seeing him in the stands rooting for his beloved teams.”

Just 37 years old when he stepped into the job in 1987, Hill leaves an impressive legacy of accomplishments, perhaps chief among them Utah’s move into the power five in 2011 as a member of the Pac-12 Conference.

In the years leading up to it, Hill turned down several director offers from power five schools in the belief that one day Utah would count itself among them.

“Happiness isn’t all about money and prestige,” says Hill of his decision to stay in Salt Lake City. “All of us who have worked in Utah athletics knew this place was a sleeping giant and we never gave up hope that we could get it done here. My wife Kathy and I love living in Salt Lake City and raising our family here. The University of Utah fit the academic profile of the (former) Pac-10 Conference, so we in athletics did everything we could to position ourselves similarly from an athletic standpoint.”

A New Jersey native and Rutgers’ basketball player, Hill came to Salt Lake City in 1973 as a graduate assistant basketball coach on Bill Foster’s staff. He would then coach high school basketball for four years at Salt Lake’s Granger High School before returning to the U. as an assistant coach under Jerry Pimm for two seasons (1979-81). While coaching, he earned a master’s in education (1974) and a Ph.D. in educational administration (1982) from Utah. His bachelor’s degree from Rutgers was in math education.

After leaving coaching for a position as the executive director of United Cerebral Palsy of Utah, Hill remained connected with the University by teaching in the U.’s special education department. He returned to athletics as the Crimson Club director in 1985—spending two years in the position before his promotion to director of athletics in October of 1987.

“My children grew up on University of Utah sports,” said Hill. “How lucky am I that my family could be with me enjoying the games and excitement surrounding college athletics all these years? I am so grateful to our terrific staff and coaches whose energy and passion for Utah athletics make coming to work something to look forward to every day. The icing on the cake is being around these phenomenal student-athletes year in and year out. They are at the very top of the list for why this is such a great job.”

A lifelong advocate for improving the experience of the student-athlete, Hill also prioritized hiring and retaining top coaches and upgrading facilities in his efforts to make Utah a viable power five option. His success in those areas helped Utah athletics reach unprecedented heights along the way.

While dedicated to maintaining the school’s established reputation in basketball, gymnastics and skiing, Hill immediately set about redefining Utah football, which had an unremarkable history and just two bowl appearances (the last in 1964) prior to his ascension to director of athletics. Under coaches hired by Hill, the Utes have played in 19 bowl games with a 15-4 record.

In 2004, Utah football was the original “BCS Buster” when it went 12-0 under coach Urban Meyer and became the first school from a non-power five conference to play in the Bowl Championship Series (now the College Football Playoff). In 2008, the Kyle Whittingham-coached Utes finished with a No. 2 national ranking in a 13-0 season that culminated with a win over Alabama in the Sugar Bowl.

Meyer (2004) and Whittingham (2008) both earned National Coach of the Year honors as did another Hill hire—men’s basketball coach Rick Majerus in 1998.

Utah’s other sports have also attained conference and national prominence during Hill’s term. Now in their seventh season of Pac-12 membership, the Utes own four Pac-12 championships—three by gymnastics and one by baseball—and shared the South Division championship in football in 2015.

The gymnastics and ski teams have combined for 10 national championships and 14 NCAA runner-up finishes while qualifying into the NCAA Championships every year. The gymnastics team has advanced to the Super Six 20 times.

The men’s and women’s basketball teams have both reached the NCAA Tournament 15 times with Hill as the athletics director. The men’s basketball team, which played in the 1998 NCAA Championship game, has six Sweet 16 and two Elite Eight finishes, while the women’s team has advanced to the Sweet 16 twice and the Elite Eight once.

Volleyball and softball have qualified into the NCAA Tournament 14 times each, with volleyball making three Sweet 16 appearances (including this past fall) and softball making the Super Regionals in 2016 and 2017.

Women’s soccer, which has played in the NCAA Tournament seven times, is one of two varsity sports added by Hill. The other is men’s lacrosse, which will start in 2018-19.

With Hill as the driving force, 17 new intercollegiate athletics facilities have opened on campus, including Rice-Eccles Stadium (1998), Burbidge Athletics Academic Center (2001), McCarthey Family Track & Field (2010), Dumke Family Softball Stadium (2013), Spence & Cleone Eccles Football Center (2013), Jon M. and Karen Huntsman Basketball Center (2015) and Spence Eccles Ski Building (2017).

On an administrative front, Hill has achieved national prominence and served on several boards, including the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Committee (2004-09), chair of the NCAA Championships/Competition Cabinet (1997-98) and the NCAA Management Council Administrative Committee. He was on NACDA’s executive committee from 2002-06.

He has received a number of awards, including the 2011 National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) West Region Athletic Director of the Year. He was a finalist for the 2011 Athletic Director of the Year by SportsBusiness Journal and SportsBusiness Daily.

Hill was inducted into the Jersey Shore Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2001, the National Consortium for Academics and Sports awarded him its Degree Completion and Outreach and Community Service Honor Award.

Uncovering sustainability

Sustainability is much more than just environment.

In 2011, the University of Utah began incorporating sustainability more broadly into its curriculum. Today, faculty across campus are enhancing education by implementing the big ideas of sustainability—equity, economy, and environment into their courses and departments.

Over 200 courses with a new sustainability attribute and 10 departments with a sustainability learning outcome illuminate the wide reach of sustainability initiatives. Students can locate courses with the new SUSC/SUSL sustainability attribute in the course catalog when signing up for classes.

“We don’t want to limit this large, integrated, conceptual issue of sustainability to a single discipline, set of behaviors, or required course,” said Adrienne Cachelin, director of sustainability education and associate professor in Environmental & Sustainability Studies. “We want to illuminate how and where faculty members are integrating studies of ecological limits with understandings of equity and economic systems. These learning outcomes and course attributes demonstrate the diverse approaches to sustainability education at the U.”

Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes are formal statements of the knowledge and skills a student is expected to master by the time they finish their program of study. Sustainability learning outcomes enable departments to explain their discipline’s unique contributions to the University’s larger commitment to sustainability education.

10 departments have already articulated how their discipline contributes to sustainability education, and more are working on the process.

Course attributes

Even if a department doesn’t yet have a sustainability learning outcome, individual courses from that program can earn a sustainability attribute. There are two tiers in the course attributes:

  • Limited (SUSL) – awarded to courses that incorporate a unit or module on sustainability or a sustainability challenge.
  • Complete (SUSC) – awarded to courses whose content identifies and describes the relationship between the course topic, equity, economy, and environmental dimensions.

“A course attribute doesn’t mean the course has to cover every bit of sustainability,” explained Cachelin. “They might be studying one or two of the three big ideas, or it might be the entire course is about something else but they are using a case study that is sustainability-related. These courses are still incredibly valuable for student understanding.”

Faculty wishing to obtain the attribute may submit their course for review by the Sustainability Education Advisory Committee.

Other resources

For faculty wanting to get involved in sustainability education, the Wasatch Experience Faculty Workshop provides an opportunity for interdisciplinary faculty cohorts to work together to design impactful educational programming.

For students eager to apply their learning from these courses with on-campus projects, the Sustainability Scholars program offers a year-long cohort to explore these ideas. This learning community is open to undergraduate students from across campus, and fulfills the Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement for graduation, with a new cohort beginning in Fall 2018.

From learning cohorts to course attributes to learning outcomes, the U’s recent efforts uncover the breadth of sustainability, while supporting those who wish to integrate it into their teaching and learning.

A DESIRE TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

By Stacy Kish, science writer, University of Utah Health

Growing up on the island of Kauai, Caitlin Stiglmeier developed an intense respect and love for the land. After completing a project on the East coast, she was overwhelmed by the same feeling as she drove west, deeper into the rural serenity that brought her to the Navajo reservation.

“I can’t really describe it, but I felt like I was entering into a special place,” she said.

Stiglmeier arrived at this region of northeastern Arizona to apply her medical skills as a fellow in the Global, Rural and Underserved Child Health (GRUCH) Fellowship program.

The GRUCH Fellowship program at University of Utah Health was designed to train pediatricians to become global health leaders. The participants apply their skills both locally and internationally by caring for children whose health care needs are underserved.

“This is a tough job,” said Jeff Robison, director of the GRUCH program and an assistant professor in the Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Primary Children’s Hospital. “Our fellows have to operate in difficult clinical environments and be flexible, humble and innovative.”

PHOTO CREDIT: Caitlin Stiglmeier

Rwanda

Every year the program hires two fellows. One provides care at the Chinle Comprehensive Health Center in partnership with Navajo Area Indian Health in Chinle, Arizona. The second provides care at the Butare University Teaching Hospital and the Kabutare District Hospital in Rwanda. After six months, the two fellows switch locations.

While in the field, the fellows face resource limited conditions that produce unique challenges rarely encountered by doctors practicing in more developed settings.

“Working in Rwanda, I can’t rely on expensive tests to give me the answers,” said Lorin Hall, a current GRUCH fellow.

Hall diagnosed several patients with brucellosis, a bacterial infection transmitted by animal contact and contaminated milk. The diagnosis requires a patient complete several weeks of antibiotics. She based her diagnosis after taking her patient’s history and learning that they often drank unpasteurized milk.

“It made me appreciate the importance of my physical exam skills and taking patient histories,” she said.

As the fellows strengthen their bedside care, they must also adjust their approach to meet their patients’ needs in culturally diverse settings. Reena Tam, an inaugural fellow and now assistant program director for the GRUCH Fellowship program, tied her success during the program to knowing how to develop trust with her patients.

“Trust is a work in progress,” said Tam. “At each location, learning the culture was a priority, and I worked on building trust with each individual patient through understanding.”

In addition to caring for their patients, the fellows work to address a need identified by their health care partners at each location. In Chinle, fellows are working on standardizing care for toddlers with respiratory issues. In Rwanda, fellows are focused on lowering the rate of hospital-acquired infections for newborns admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

PHOTO CREDIT: Caitlin Stiglmeier

Chinle Spider Rock

Hall extended her fellowship into a second year to ensure a project to raise awareness of proper hand hygiene that she developed in Rwanda gains traction. She is motivated by the program’s success, seeing NICU infections fall from 11 to 1 percent.

Robison believes fellows are drawn to this work through personal experiences and a desire to make a difference. As the GRUCH fellowship program enters its third year, a new set of fellows will enter the field in July 2018.

“Visiting family in India, I first witnessed real poverty,” said Anik Patel, who will continue the work of current GRUCH fellows Stiglmeier and Hall. “I see my role in serving people through medicine not only as the right thing to do but it is the good thing to do.”

Esther Shin is also excited for the fellowship to begin, but she is aware of the great responsibility ahead of her.

“It is nerve-wracking stepping into these waters,” Shin said. She remains focused on honing her skills through the program while helping her patients and giving back to these communities.

Stiglmeier and Hall have a few words of advice for Patel and Shin and all future GRUCH fellows.

“Come into this fellowship with an open heart and an open mind,” Stiglmeier said. Hall continues, “Change happens slowly, work with every population as a team and not as an outsider.”

Robison believes this program empowers the next generation of future global health leaders while instilling them with skills that are just as applicable to rural American, where health care facilities are few and resources limited.

As the next year of fellows prepares to venture into the field, the GRUCH fellowship program remains committed to working with their health care partners in the Navajo Nation and Rwanda to provide high quality, sustainable care for children.

The GRUCH program selects fellows from a highly competitive pool of applicants from across the country. Inaugural fellows, Tam, Hall and Stiglmeier received medical degrees from the Ohio State University, University of Tennessee, Health Science Center in Memphis and St. George’s University, Grenada, respectively. Shin and Patel received their medical degrees from Tufts University and University of Missouri, respectively.

The next class of fellows will be selected in November. Learn more about Global Health program at U of U Health.

CRIME RESEARCH

By Melinda Rogers, media relations manager, S.J. Quinney College of Law

A crushing wave of homicides swept through Chicago in 2016, leading to intense discussion over how to stop the bloodshed. As broader discussion over how to curb gun violence continues across the nation, a pair of University of Utah researchers have found a link between the 2016 spike in Chicago homicides and a decline in law enforcement’s ability to use stop-and-frisk policies in policing to approach suspicious people on the street.

Richard Fowles

In a research paper to be presented April 4 at the University of Illinois College of Law, S.J. Quinney College of Law presidential professor Paul Cassell and University of Utah economics professor Richard Fowles used an econometric analysis to conclude that the 2016 spike in homicides in Chicago was caused by a reduction in the practice of stop-and-frisks by law enforcement in the wake of a settlement agreement obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) designed to limit stop-and-frisks.

Paul G. Cassell

Cassell and Fowles’ study, “What Caused the 2016 Chicago Homicide Spike? An Empirical Examination of the “ACLU Effect” and the Role of Stop-and-Frisks in Preventing Gun Violence,” concludes that fewer people would have died in Chicago if law enforcement were allowed to continue stop-and-frisk practices in policing.

In 2015, following threats by the ACLU of Illinois to sue the Chicago Police Department, an agreement was reached designed to restrict the practice of investigatory street stops, known as “stop-and-frisks,” an approach used by police to proactively investigate people on the street when a reasonable suspicion criminal activity is afoot. The ACLU argued the practice was unfairly applied and had no real connection to preventing crimes. To avoid a lawsuit, the police department agreed to change its stop and frisk policies by the end of 2015.

The change has had disastrous consequences, according to Cassell and Fowles. The number of stop-and-frisks carried out by Chicago police fell dramatically beginning in December 2015, and homicides increased dramatically in Chicago in 2016.  In 2015, 480 Chicago residents were killed. The next year, 754 were killed–274 more homicide victims, producing a 58 percent increase in a single year.

Cassell and Fowles ran a multiple regression analysis of this sharp upward spike in homicides, as well as related shooting crimes. Controlling for such things as temperature, arrests for various crime categories, and 911 calls to police, the researchers quantify that the costs of a declining number of stop-and-frisks by police as about 230 additional victims killed and 1,100 additional shootings taking place in the city in 2016. The majority of those killed were African-Americans and Hispanics. In short, the researchers found, the “ACLU Effect” — a term used by some Chicago police officers to describe a rise in crime that they attribute to fewer stop-and-frisks — was a real and lethal problem.

“Our research helps to pinpoint the cause of one of the most striking increases in crime in a major American city in recent years. Sadly, the cause was a restriction on pro-active police policies forced by the ACLU,” said Cassell.

“As a consequence of these changes, Chicago police conducted far fewer stop-and-frisks in 2016.  While the changes were well-intentioned, the results were disastrous.  Many additional homicides and shooting crimes occurred in 2016, particularly some of Chicago’s most impoverished neighborhoods.”

The researchers offer several policy suggestions for Chicago policymakers to consider as a way to change the trend. They suggest: reassessing the benefits of stop-and-frisk as a policing tool; reassuring minority communities that stop-and-frisks can serve a vital law enforcement purpose; removing or simplifying the stop-and-frisk form to make the tool easier for police officers to use; relying on body cameras more broadly; and researching, through randomized controlled trials, the efficacy of stop-and-frisks.

“The costs of crime — and particularly gun crimes — are too significant to avoid considering every possible measure for reducing the toll,” Cassell and Fowles state in the conclusion of their study. “The evidence gathered here suggests that stop and frisk policies may be truly lifesaving measures that have to be considered as part of any effective law enforcement response to gun violence.”

*Image from Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Amy Wildermuth named dean of University of Pittsburgh School of Law
Paleontology procures the prize: Linda K. Amos Award winner announced
Binge worthy: UMC film festival

HIP talks speech contest
2018 Global Learning retreat call for applications

The Great ShakeOut drill
Summer technology camp
UKids summer camp 2018
Fall textbook adoption requests due
Beacons of Excellence Award call for nominations


Amy Wildermuth named dean of University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Amy Wildermuth, associate vice president for faculty and chief sustainability officer, has accepted an offer from the University of Pittsburgh to serve as dean of the School of Law, effective July 1, 2018. Wildermuth has served on the University of Utah faculty since 2001. She has remained active as a teacher and scholar, even as she assumed the roles of associate vice president for faculty in 2011 and chief sustainability officer in 2013. As AVP, Wildermuth worked to support chairs and deans, enhanced retention, promotion and tenure and hiring practices, solved many challenges and provided guidance and timely help to leaders across the university. As chief sustainability officer, Wildermuth has been a passionate advocate and partner on many innovative efforts, from community solar and electric vehicle programs to increasing sustainability learning outcomes to implementing strategies that advance our progress toward carbon neutrality.

Dr. Harriet Hopf, professor and vice chair for faculty development in the Department of Anesthesiology and adjunct professor of bioengineering, will serve in the role of associate vice president for faculty on a part-time basis in the interim, beginning on April 2, 2018. More information about leadership for the Sustainability Office will be forthcoming.


PALEONTOLOGY PROCURES THE PRIZE: LINDA K. AMOS AWARD WINNER ANNOUNCED

The 2018 Linda K. Amos award was presented to Carolyn (Carrie) Levitt-Bussian collections manager of paleontology at the Natural History Museum of Utah. The award was presented on March 2, 2018, by Kathryn Bond Stockton, associate vice president for Equity and Diversity and Lauren Clark, professor in the College of Nursing, who represented the Linda K. Amos Award Subcommittee of the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women.

“I’m very, very honored and never expected to receive an award like this for the work I do in paleontology,” said Levitt-Bussian. “To me, I’m just doing my job. I don’t feel like I’m going above and beyond, I’m just doing the job I love. I like to spend time taking people on behind-the-scenes tours, and teaching during job shadows and internships. It’s an amazing honor to receive this for continuing to improve the educational and working environment for women.”

Levitt-Bussian, in addition to being the collections manager of paleontology at the NHMU, is a full-time mentor. She offers college students a hands-on internship where participants get real lab and curation experiences handling fossils. In fact, three of her student interns actually decided to change their majors and pursue a science degree after their experiences. She also offers job shadowing to young people and mentors the museum’s many volunteers.

Click here to read the full story.


BINGE WORTHY: UMC FILM FESTIVAL

Forget Netflix originals and YouTube cat videos, if you’re looking for your next binge-watching marathon the University’s Marketing & Communication (UMC) team has you covered. The office recently hosted a campus film festival to show the best of its video production work over the past year – 36 short films you can watch via this link.

The films were produced on behalf of campus entities to help tell the stories of people and programs from across campus. The short features included stories on student housing, Utah Esports, the value of getting a humanities degree, and why you might not want to take personal advice from first-year students.

“We have worked hard over the past few years to recruit some of the best creative talent in Salt Lake City to our team. Local advertising agencies are taking notice, our in-house ability to produce top-notch video content is as good as you’d find at any local agency,” according to Jeff Hanson, UMC’s executive producer. Hanson points to the 10 awards received by the office in 2017 from the University & College Designers Association (the most UCDA awards than any other university or college in the nation for the year).

While the office has plenty of work on its hands, Hansen says the team is always ready to meet with campus clients to discuss and brainstorm new projects. You can reach Hansen at 801-581-7509 or via email at jeff.hanson@utah.edu.

Click here to read the full story.


HIP Talks Speech Contest

In honor of the public speaking skills of former Utah Congressman Wayne Owens, the Hinckley Institute of Politics and ASUU are proud to host the HIP Talks annual speech contest.

Participants have two minutes to deliver a speech on any topic of their choosing. One grand prize winner will receive $5,000 and five runners up each receive $1,000. This event is open to all University of Utah students who want to contribute original, powerful thinking in the form of public speaking. Qualifying rounds: April 2, 3 and 4. Final round: April 11.

Click here for more information.


2018 GLOBAL LEARNING RETREAT CALL FOR APPLICATIONS
Deadline for applications: April 9, 2018

The Office for Global Engagement (OGE) invites faculty, administrators, and staff for a retreat in beautiful Centennial Valley, Montana, in the relaxing setting of the TNC Environmental Humanities Center to educate, motivate, and facilitate the advancement of global learning across the disciplines on our campus.

Retreat dates: Sept. 20-23, 2018. 

For more details and how to apply, click here.

The retreat will build on the Global Learning Across the Disciplines (GLAD) grant initiative that seeks to incentivize curriculum revision to integrate global and intercultural learning. The retreat will provide structured interaction and training with experts in the field as well as informal exchanges and activities in a place designed for rumination and contemplation. Participants will learn about the AAC&U VALUE rubrics to define learning outcomes and assess stated outcomes, to design classroom activities and assignments that focus on global learning, and improve teaching and learning for students to develop the global competence that will be required for them to succeed in today’s interconnected world.

We invite faculty, administrators, and staff involved in, or interested in global learning and curriculum internationalization to apply for this exceptional opportunity for professional development. Learn from the experts, meet and find new ways to collaborate with other individuals on campus who are engaged in global learning, and explore the unique setting in Centennial Valley. The retreat will include up to 20 participants who will be selected and invited by OGE after an initial application process.


THE GREAT SHAKEOUT DRILL

The Great Utah ShakeOut is an opportunity for our University campus to learn about overall preparedness plans, what to do during earthquakes, and then practice those skills.

Watch for a campus alert on April 19, 2018, at 10:15 a.m., encouraging everyone to practice drop, cover and hold on. Practice and reinforcement of these protective actions can help prevent injury when the earth starts to shake. Remember, it is not the shaking of the ground that causes death or injury, it is the objects that are falling that will be most dangerous.

If you haven’t signed up to receive emergency messages from the University, please update your profile in CIS today. Help us keep our students and campus community prepared and safe by encouraging participation in the Great Utah ShakeOut earthquake drill.


SUMMER TECHNOLOGY CAMP

The School of Computing’s GREAT summer technology camps are open for registration. These camps have programs for upper elementary, middle school, and high school ages with topics in computer programming, game development, graphics and robotics. Most camps are one week programs from 9a-3p with an optional late afternoon activity.

Learn more about these camps at cs.utah.edu/~dejohnso/GREAT or just search “GREAT camps Utah.”


UKIDS SUMMER CAMP 2018

Calling all kiddos ages 5-8. Join us this summer at UKids – Presidents Circle for Summer Camp 2018.

First session will begin May 14 and end June 20, second session will begin June 21 and end Aug. 1. There will be a $100 discount for registering for both sessions.

The camps will feature two weekly field trips, including such places as Hogle Zoo and Discovery Gateway, developmentally appropriate curriculum and lots of opportunities for adventure. Registration will open early April so mark your calendars.

If you have any questions, please call 801-585-7393 or email presidentscircle@sa.utah.edu. Hope to see you there.


 Fall Textbook Adoption Requests Due

If you haven’t submitted your textbook adoptions to the University Campus Store for 2018 fall semester, it’s not too late. Submitting adoptions is easy—simply complete the University Campus Store’s online textbook adoption form for a Quick Adoption. If you need assistance, please contact Dave Nelson at 801-581-8321 or dnelson@campusstore.utah.edu.

Prompt submission of textbook adoptions by faculty each semester enables the Campus Store to stock books in a timely manner and increases the chances of offering used textbooks, eBooks and rental textbooks, all of which help students save up to 50 percent off of new book prices. The Campus Store relies heavily on your timely response, so please don’t delay.

Final textbook adoptions for summer and fall 2018 semesters are due on  April 6.

Thank you for your ongoing support of the Campus Store’s textbook adoption program and best wishes for another great academic year.


BEACONS OF EXCELLENCE AWARD CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Consider nominating a person, program or project to recognize contributions to an exceptional undergraduate educational experience at the University of Utah.

Nominations are due by 5 p.m. on April 6, 2018. Nominate someone here

The University of Utah fosters a transformational experience for all students. We value and recognize a respect for knowledge that empowers students to become actively engaged on campus. We accomplish this through recognizing people, programs and projects committed to excellence.

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Pre-summer intensive courses available
Amy Wildermuth named dean of University of Pittsburgh School of Law
Science Advising Hive

Apply now to work with the Hinckley Institute
HIP talks speech contest
Paleontology procures the prize: Linda K. Amos Award winner announced
Binge worthy: UMC film festival

The Great ShakeOut drill
Beacons of Excellence Award call for nominations


Pre-Summer Intensive Courses Available

Maximize your summer break with an intensive course May 7–11. Courses are offered Monday through Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. with a one hour lunch.

Course locations are on the Main Campus as well as at the University of Utah’s Sandy Center. Intensive classes will be as rigorous as a semester-long class and requires attendance at each class session.

In addition to time spent in the classroom, students will be required to complete pre and post work. Explore courses at flexibleoptions.utah.edu. Questions? Call 801-585-9963.


Amy Wildermuth named dean of University of Pittsburgh School of Law

Amy Wildermuth, associate vice president for faculty and chief sustainability officer, has accepted an offer from the University of Pittsburgh to serve as dean of the School of Law, effective July 1, 2018. Wildermuth has served on the University of Utah faculty since 2001. She has remained active as a teacher and scholar, even as she assumed the roles of associate vice president for faculty in 2011 and chief sustainability officer in 2013. As AVP, Wildermuth worked to support chairs and deans, enhanced retention, promotion and tenure and hiring practices, solved many challenges and provided guidance and timely help to leaders across the university. As chief sustainability officer, Wildermuth has been a passionate advocate and partner on many innovative efforts, from community solar and electric vehicle programs to increasing sustainability learning outcomes to implementing strategies that advance our progress toward carbon neutrality.

Dr. Harriet Hopf, professor and vice chair for faculty development in the Department of Anesthesiology and adjunct professor of bioengineering, will serve in the role of associate vice president for faculty on a part-time basis in the interim, beginning on April 2, 2018. More information about leadership for the Sustainability Office will be forthcoming.


Science Advising Hive

The College of Science has launched a new Academic Advising Hive. It’s a one-stop shop for student success. The Advising Hive is located in the Crocker Science Center, room 240, and it’s Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Advisors rotate on a weekly schedule, which is posted online, science.utah.edu/students/advising.php.

The college now employs nine full-time advisors. Previously, the four science departments — Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics & Astronomy — had just one faculty advisor each.

Visit: science.utah.edu/students/advising.php for details.


Apply now to work with the Hinckley Institute

Apply now to work with the Hinckley Institute If you are looking for a new way to get involved in the Hinckley Institute next year, here is your chance! We are looking for students to be a part of our student staff, student ambassador program and to be forum hosts. Applications for the 2018-2019 academic year are now open and we want you to apply. The deadline for all applications is Friday, April 6.

Click here to apply for student staff. Click here to apply to be a forum host/ambassador.


HIP Talks Speech Contest

In honor of the public speaking skills of former Utah Congressman Wayne Owens, the Hinckley Institute of Politics and ASUU are proud to host the HIP Talks annual speech contest.

 


PALEONTOLOGY PROCURES THE PRIZE: LINDA K. AMOS AWARD WINNER ANNOUNCED

The 2018 Linda K. Amos award was presented to Carolyn (Carrie) Levitt-Bussian collections manager of paleontology at the Natural History Museum of Utah. The award was presented on March 2, 2018, by Kathryn Bond Stockton, associate vice president for Equity and Diversity and Lauren Clark, professor in the College of Nursing, who represented the Linda K. Amos Award Subcommittee of the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women.

“I’m very, very honored and never expected to receive an award like this for the work I do in paleontology,” said Levitt-Bussian. “To me, I’m just doing my job. I don’t feel like I’m going above and beyond, I’m just doing the job I love. I like to spend time taking people on behind-the-scenes tours, and teaching during job shadows and internships. It’s an amazing honor to receive this for continuing to improve the educational and working environment for women.”

Levitt-Bussian, in addition to being the collections manager of paleontology at the NHMU, is a full-time mentor. She offers college students a hands-on internship where participants get real lab and curation experiences handling fossils. In fact, three of her student interns actually decided to change their majors and pursue a science degree after their experiences. She also offers job shadowing to young people and mentors the museum’s many volunteers.

Click here to read the full story.


BINGE WORTHY: UMC FILM FESTIVAL

Forget Netflix originals and YouTube cat videos, if you’re looking for your next binge-watching marathon the University’s Marketing & Communication (UMC) team has you covered. The office recently hosted a campus film festival to show the best of its video production work over the past year – 36 short films you can watch via this link.

The films were produced on behalf of campus entities to help tell the stories of people and programs from across campus. The short features included stories on student housing, Utah Esports, the value of getting a humanities degree, and why you might not want to take personal advice from first-year students.

“We have worked hard over the past few years to recruit some of the best creative talent in Salt Lake City to our team. Local advertising agencies are taking notice, our in-house ability to produce top-notch video content is as good as you’d find at any local agency,” according to Jeff Hanson, UMC’s executive producer. Hanson points to the 10 awards received by the office in 2017 from the University & College Designers Association (the most UCDA awards than any other university or college in the nation for the year).

While the office has plenty of work on its hands, Hansen says the team is always ready to meet with campus clients to discuss and brainstorm new projects. You can reach Hansen at 801-581-7509 or via email at jeff.hanson@utah.edu.

Click here to read the full story.


THE GREAT SHAKEOUT DRILL

The Great Utah ShakeOut is an opportunity for our University campus to learn about overall preparedness plans, what to do during earthquakes, and then practice those skills.

Watch for a campus alert on April 19, 2018, at 10:15 a.m., encouraging everyone to practice drop, cover and hold on. Practice and reinforcement of these protective actions can help prevent injury when the earth starts to shake. Remember, it is not the shaking of the ground that causes death or injury, it is the objects that are falling that will be most dangerous.

If you haven’t signed up to receive emergency messages from the University, please update your profile in CIS today. Help us keep our students and campus community prepared and safe by encouraging participation in the Great Utah ShakeOut earthquake drill.


BEACONS OF EXCELLENCE AWARD CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Consider nominating a person, program or project to recognize contributions to an exceptional undergraduate educational experience at the University of Utah.

Nominations are due by 5 p.m. on April 6, 2018. Nominate someone here

The University of Utah fosters a transformational experience for all students. We value and recognize a respect for knowledge that empowers students to become actively engaged on campus. We accomplish this through recognizing people, programs and projects committed to excellence.