TIPS FOR THE UPCOMING HOLIDAYS

Editor’s note: The following is a round-up of holiday articles from years past.

A TRADITION OF KINDNESS

With the holiday season approaching, it’s a good time to teach children how to establish a tradition of doing small acts of kindness. Susan Johnston, professor of special education at the U, created a book to do just that. “The Gnome in Your Home – A Tradition of Kindness” is an illustrated children’s book and plush toy inspired by Johnston’s own family’s experiences as well as her professional work.

gnomeopenbook“In my personal life, instead of feeling helpless when hearing about acts of violence in the world, I decided to start a tradition of doing kind acts for others,” said Johnston. “In addition to spreading kindness, my family found that our positive feelings increased and it reduced our stress. Further, I was completely surprised by how much my son enjoyed the process and doing acts of kindness.”

Read the full story here.


GO GREEN FOR THE SEASON

During the holiday season, many people enjoy watching as the leaves change color and a fresh blanket of snow covers the valley. In this celebration of colors, why don’t we work together to add some green to the mix? Check out these 10 ways to make the holiday season more sustainable.

Read the full story here.


Table talk

Professors David Derezotes and Paul H. White are feeling the tension and know you are feeling it, too. It’s a been a tumultuous election, the end of the semester, with all its pressures, is near and now here comes a holiday break when many of us are likely to be spending a lot more time than usual with family and friends who may not share our views.

“The holidays are when we get to see people we love, but it often puts us over the top in stress and we end up behaving in ways that might create more stress and even embarrass ourselves,” says Derezotes, a professor in the College of Social Work and director of Peace and Conflict Studies in the College of Humanities.

Read the full story here.


 

Humans of the U: October & November

“I used to do ultramarathons, but I wanted to find something new. I am a Harry Potter fan, but I don’t really associate playing Quidditch with that. It has some of my favorite parts of different sports combined into one.

I played for the U’s team for two seasons and last season I played Major League Quidditch for the Salt Lake City Hive. At the regional championships last year we played Arizona State. We were just incredible; very physical. People who had been nervous or who were developing really stepped up. Just playing with that group of people made me more happy than I’ve been doing a lot of things.

Seeker is an interesting position. You have this neutral player called the snitch, and they have shorts on with Velcro and a flag that contains a tennis ball. It’s pretty simple, you grab the flag. We can’t tackle the snitch. A snitch can do whatever they want to you, within reason. You’re limited because you have to stay on broom. You are wrestling with them, but you only have one arm. What I do have is the element of surprise. If I’m very quick or physical or tire him out, all I need to do is get back there for a second and grab that flag.

Quidditch is a gender-integrated sport. You can make waves with any particular athletic background as long as you’re leveraging your natural gifts. I’m 6’5”. I leverage my length really well.

Quidditch can be whatever you want it to be. I would love to see people who might hear about it and say “I play real sports” to say, “let me see if this is a real sport” because it is full tackle and the things that seem hokey really aren’t. I think people would love it if they gave it a shot.”

Learn more about Crimson Elite here.
Learn more about the U’s official club Quidditch team here.
Learn more about the Salt Lake City Hive here.

— Nate Western, Keeper and Seeker for Crimson Elite

 

“You know how they say, bad things come in threes? I now believe that. Last summer my uncle-in-law passed away from a sudden heart attack; then our family dog was put down; and that June, my mother was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma – non-smoker’s lung cancer – stage 4. The doctors gave her six to 12 months to live.

One day, while waiting for my mom’s diagnosis, I was at my in-law’s house and walked past their piano. I stopped suddenly and stared at it, and it was like we had a silent conversation with each other.

My family is not musically gifted. None of us can really hold a note, but the pull I felt was too strong, so I decided to start lessons. For Christmas, I wanted to give my mom something that could not be purchased, something from the heart: her favorite song. When I showed my teacher the piano piece I wanted to learn, she had this terrified look in her eyes. It was very advanced, especially for a first-time student. But, I was determined and got to work. I practiced and slowly learned the piece line by line.

I finished learning the last note three days before Christmas. My mom was able to be home, and with the entire family present, I played the song. It’s called “Lòng Mẹ,” which means “Mother’s Love in Vietnamese. It was the first and the last song I ever played for her.

I devoted so much time to the piece so that my mother could know how much I loved and appreciated her. It was as if the music grieved with me. All the pain and anger, all the feeling that I could’ve possibly felt, was flowing out of my fingers.

My mom passed away in March. Learning the piano allowed me to live, while a part of me was dying. Now, I play for my mother. I play for what I lost. For my emotions and my recovery. I had a fantastic support system. But it was the piano that helped me with the journey of grief.”

— Tina Nguyen , University of Utah Information Security Office

 

“I experienced a turning point in my academic and pre-professional career last fall.

I had signed up for 18-credit hours, which included some of the hardest classes in my major. I also was selected as an inaugural Greg Goff Strategic Leadership Fellow, was working 20-hours a week and was heavily involved in the men’s Ultimate Frisbee club team.

As the semester wore on, one thing added onto another and I found that instead of being successful I was a bit overwhelmed and stressed out. I had spread myself too thin, which became clear in a peer evaluation I received as part of the Goff program. It wasn’t terrible, it was pretty middle-of-the road. But it was honest.

My team said I had taken on too many things and it was hard for me to focus on the job at hand. They also pointed out I needed to work on being an active listener who solicited others thoughts rather than focusing on my own ideas.

I hadn’t been constructively criticized like that before in a classroom setting. That was new to me. It was a bit tough to swallow at first, but I took a step back and said I have to trust my classmates, take their feedback honestly and truly work to improve in these areas. They were not trying to hurt my feelings, they just wanted to help me improve as a peer, classmate and a professional.

It was a good opportunity for me to refocus. I learned the most valuable of lessons: I have to take ownership of everything I do if I want to have a positive impact.”

— Jeff Letsinger, senior majoring in finance, 2016-17 Greg Goff Strategic Leadership fellow

“Last spring, I was having an existential crisis with where I was going, what I wanted to do. Part of it was that my mental health wasn’t in the best place. I was showing classic symptoms of acute depression, but I had no idea what was going on at the time. It got pretty bad. I would stay in bed, hours would roll by, and I started missing tests and projects. I told myself that I had to find a way to re-inspire myself.

At the time, I was volunteering at Shriners Hospital for Children, making braces and prosthetics. Kids quickly outgrew and returned them in amazing condition, but we just had to throw them away. Something felt wrong. Ten years ago, I visited an orphanage in India where children suffered from these exact same diseases, but didn’t have access to the medical devices needed to treat them. Those images stuck with me. So, I started Project Embrace, a non-profit that repurposes unwanted medical devices for patients-in-need abroad. Right from the beginning, I knew I wanted to partner with that orphanage.

This summer, I spent a full day with the kids to see what they needed. In broken Telugu — the dialect that they speak — I’d ask, ‘How would you feel with a new set of crutches?’ They were like, ‘Oh my gosh. That’s so great! I really need it!’

Project Embrace brought things into perspective. I was so caught up with school, it was crushing when I failed to meet crazy expectations. By talking to a counselor and working on an initiative that I cared about, I kept the debilitating self-doubt at bay. The world’s not going to end if you retake a class. At the end of the day, taking what you learned in the classroom and solving real world problems is what’s rewarding; not the letter grade.”

— Mohan Sudabattula, founder of Project Embrace, is triple-majoring in biology, philosophy and health & society

 

“My brother Steven unfortunately inherited the more problematic genes in our family. He developed a fairly significant bipolar illness in his early 20s, which manifested in some pretty distressing and scary behaviors that bordered on psychotic when he was manic. He fell into a pattern where he would be arrested or taken to the VA hospital, and he lived on the streets a lot.

When Steven was in his late 40s, he was finally getting treatment and medication that helped him start to stabilize. He was living in a community home and was developing relationships with his fellow residents and caregivers. In January of his 50th year, he complained of not feeling well and was planning to go to the hospital the next day, but then he had a heart attack that night and passed away in his bathroom. I have a lot of mixed feelings about it. I’m pretty sad about the life he had but am glad he spent his last years with some stability. His life was often chaotic, but he always had the love of his family around him, even when it was hard for him to let that in. He was a survivor.

Looking back, he gave me so many gifts. We always shared a bond over music, which was a real place of connection for us. Even remembering one instance when I lost it with him is something I’m grateful for because it allowed me to feel anger in its purest form, which is an emotion I don’t typically express. He gave me a different level of empathy and appreciation for what people living with mental illness have to navigate and helped me realized that not having a mental illness is such a privilege in so many ways.”

— Lauren Weitzman with Steven’s guitar, Director, University Counseling Center

“As a history student interested in entering law school, I believe that gaining an awareness of the many carceral issues of our nation faces – such as understanding why the U.S. has the highest incarceration rate in the world and why recidivism rates have increased in the past few decades even as our country has developed in many other areas – is very important for shaping my future career.

As part of the Education and Incarceration Praxis Lab in the Honors College, I was able to visit a medium-security correctional facility with a newly created higher education program in Nashville, Tennessee. Visiting the prison was both eye-opening and humbling at the same time. Upon entering the facility and interacting with the incarcerated students, many of my preconceived notions of their attitudes, life perspectives and experiences in prison were thrown out the window. All of the incarcerated individuals I met who were eager to pursue higher education were incredibly bright, well-spoken and passionate about creating a better future for themselves.

Along with the visit to the facility in Nashville, my class also visited the Salt Lake County Jail, the Utah State Prison and the Timpanogos Women’s Facility to learn more about their existing educational programs. One of the most humbling experiences I had was when we were given the chance to speak with the women at Timpanogos to learn about what kinds of opportunities they would like to see created within the facility. Currently, the DOC only offers two vocational programs for women – cooking and cosmetology – compared to seven programs for men. Not only is this questionable and discriminatory, but vocational programs in general do not have nearly the effect that comprehensive college-in-prison programs have. During the semester, we learned that many formerly incarcerated individuals are unable to find employment using their vocational program certificates.

I believe that providing higher education to incarcerated people is not only critical in addressing some of our nation’s crippling carceral issues, but it is also beneficial for American society as whole. Beyond the well-established and quantifiable benefits that higher education in prison programs bring, they also empower people to become productive and contributing members of society.”

— Hans Liu, co-founder of the University of Utah Prison Education Project

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SHAPING SNOWSTORM IMPACTS

A six-foot-wide snowblower mounted on a tractor makes a lot of sense when you live on the Tug Hill plateau. Tug Hill, in upstate New York, is one of the snowiest places in the eastern U.S. and experiences some of the most intense snowstorms in the world.  This largely rural region, just east of Lake Ontario, gets an average of 20 feet of snow a year.

Hence the tractor-mounted snowblower.

The region’s massive snow totals are due to lake-effect snowstorms, bands of snow resulting from warm lake water fueling intense, long-lasting storms. Lake-effect snow is common in the Great Lakes region and in areas downwind of large bodies of water, including the Great Salt Lake.

Researchers, including the University of Utah’s Jim Steenburgh and University of Wyoming’s Bart Geerts, have now found that these intense snowstorms are fueled by a well-organized air circulation driven by the heat released by the lake, and that the shape of Lake Ontario affects the formation and location of this circulation, and thus the heaviest lake-effect snow. The results, published in three papers, show how the shorelines of lakes may help forecasters determine the impacts of lake-effect storms.

“Lake Ontario’s east-west orientation allows intense bands of snow to form,” says Ed Bensman, program director in the National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Division of Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences, which funded the research.  “This study found that the shape of the lake’s shoreline can have an important influence on the low-level winds that lead to bands of snow for hours at a time — and to heavy snow totals.  The research team analyzed the strength of these snow bands, and their formation and persistence. Snow bands were often active for several days.”

Lake-effect

Lake-effect storms begin when a cold mass of air moves over relatively warm water.  Heating and moistening of the atmosphere destabilize the air mass. These unstable convective cells are amassed by cross-lake air circulation that starts with land breezes that move offshore at places where the coastline bulges out into the lake. The circulation drives a narrow snow band that persistently dumps its moisture as snow on a narrow strip of land downwind of the lake.

PHOTO CREDIT: University of Utah

University of Utah students flash the U and celebrate a successful day of field work on the Tug Hill Plateau.

Steenburgh says it’s long been known that breezes coming from the shore onto the lake help initiate and direct the formation of snow bands. In 2013, Steenburgh and Geerts, and colleagues from universities in Illinois, Pennsylvania and upstate New York traveled to Lake Ontario as part of an NSF-funded project called the Ontario Winter Lake-effect Systems (OWLes) campaign. While Geerts’ team flew the Wyoming King Air research plane through winter storms, Steenburgh and his students set up weather monitoring equipment, including profiling radars and snow-measurement stations, to monitor the arrival of lake-effect storms near Tug Hill.

While they were there, they witnessed the region’s intense snowfall, including one storm that dropped 40 inches in 24 hours. Often snowfall rates exceeded 4 inches per hour. “That’s just amazing,” Steenburgh says. “It’s just an explosion of snow.”

The role of the bulge

PHOTO CREDIT: University of Utah

The start of a typical day of field work on the Tug Hill Plateau.

The Wyoming Cloud Radar aboard the King Air plane saw an intense secondary air circulation across the main snow band. “This circulation had a narrow updraft, creating and lifting snow like a fountain in narrow strip that dumped heavy snow where it made landfall,” Geerts says. Using a weather model, Steenburgh’s team found that this circulation was thermally driven. They also found that it originated in a land breeze generated by the lake’s shoreline geography. In some cases, another land breeze generated a second snow band that merged with the first. “The intense secondary circulation, with updrafts up to 10 m/s (around 22 miles per hour), had never been observed before,” Geerts says. “It took the U’s simulations to demonstrate that this circulation had its origin in one or more land breezes.”

One particular shoreline feature is a gentle, broad bulge along the southern shore that extends from about Niagara Falls on the west to Rochester, New York, in the east. “Those bulges, in the case we’ve examined, played an important role in determining where the lake-effect snow bands developed,” Steenburgh says. “A bulge near Oswego, New York on the southeast shore also contributed to an enhancement of the precipitation downstream of Lake Ontario over Tug Hill.”

PHOTO CREDIT: University of Utah

Tug Hill residents and businesses take well-deserved pride in their snow.

Steenburgh says the residents of the region take the heavy snowfall in stride. Roads are kept plowed, and the team found that many days the biggest challenge was just getting out of the driveway of the house they stayed at. Once the tractor-snowblower was fired up, however, the team had a clear shot.

“My group members are all a bunch of snow geeks,” Steenburgh says. “We love to see it snowing like that. It’s really pretty incredible. And, our friends on Tug Hill made sure we could do our research.”

Better forecasts

Steenburgh says that incorporating considerations of shoreline geography in weather forecast models can help better predict which communities might be most affected by incoming storms. Understanding the effect of breezes that arise from the shore shape is key, he says.

“If we want to pinpoint where the lake-effect’s going to be, we’re going to have to do a very good job of simulating what’s happening along these coastal areas,” he says.

Find the papers on which this release is based herehere and here.

Huntsman arena gets tech upgrade

PHOTO CREDIT: Steve C. Wilson, University of Utah

Utah Volleyball vs. UCLA October 20, 2017.

The University of Utah’s home for gymnastics, Men’s and Women’s basketball and volleyball teams, the Jon M. Huntsman Center, just got a tech update. With 15,000 seats, the Huntsman Center is the largest arena in the Pac-12 Conference, and the new technology will create an immersive and engaging environment for all U students, fans and alumni attending events.

“With the addition of ANC’s technology, the university is following through on our goal to offer the most innovative arena in collegiate sports,” said Chris Hill, U Athletics director. “Increasing the number of video displays will offer fans further opportunities to experience the game, receive updates and engage with each other.”

The project includes a new center-hung display, as well as additional technologies throughout the arena’s bowl.

Tech specs:

  • A center-hung display comprised of the following displays:
  • One 10mm upper ring display measuring 5.25’ high by 121.78’ wide.
  • One 10mm lower ring display measuring 2.10’ high by 88.19’ wide.
  • Two 6mm interior displays measuring 5.67’ high by 15.75’ wide.
  • Four 6mm displays measuring 16.38’ high by 25.20’ wide.
  • Four 6mm corner displays measuring 16.38’ high by 4.41’ wide.
  • Four 10mm corner board displays measuring 12.60’ high by 25.20’ wide.
  • Four 10mm corner court level displays measuring 4.2’ high by 14.7’ wide.

It is not just about the size of the new boards, but the ability to provide in-game live stat content and additional real time social media experiences to fans that make the technology awe inspiring.

“It’s been a long time coming, and we’re excited not only for our fans, but also for the campus community who will enjoy this new feature of our arena,” said Gordon Wilson, associate vice president of Auxiliary Services. “Along with athletic events, special events and commencement, attendees will be in awe of this great new addition to the historic Jon M. Huntsman arena. “

The University of Utah selected North Ridge Construction, Inc., ANC and TSA Architects for this project.

PROTECTION FROM PREDATORY LENDING AT RISK

By Melinda Rogers, media relations manager, S.J. Quinney College of Law

As proposed legislation to repeal provisions of the Dodd-Frank banking reforms — measures put into place to protect consumers after the housing crisis financially devastated millions of Americans — moves ahead in Congress, a new legal analysis released by University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law professor Christopher L. Peterson outlines why passage of the Financial Choice Act of 2017 could have dangerous consequences for consumers if the bill turns into law in the coming year.

Professor Christopher L. Peterson

Peterson’s research, titled “Choosing Corporations Over Consumers: The Financial Choice Act of 2017 and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau,” examines how the proposed legislation would affect the enforcement ability of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. The agency, known by the acronym CFPB, was created by Congress six years ago to protect consumers from unfair and deceptive lending practices and as a tool to help the American public recover from scars left by the Great Recession.

The agency’s future has again come into question after its director, Richard Cordray, announced he will step down from his position at the end of November, prompting discussion about what’s next for the agency’s leadership.

“Under Richard Cordray’s leadership, the federal government set up an effective watchdog that has been making progress in stopping the financial tricks and traps that have harmed so many American families,” explained Peterson. “But with Director Cordray stepping down and anti-consumer legislation making its way through Congress, the Consumer Bureau is at a crossroads.”

Peterson’s research, set to publish in a forthcoming issue of Consumer Finance Law Quarterly, shows how the agency ordered banks and other financial companies that engaged in illegal practices to return nearly $12 billion in restitution to the pockets of harmed American families during Cordray’s administration.

The consumer bureau works as a civil law enforcement agency to prevent illegal financial practices — such as predatory lending — from hurting consumers. Peterson’s latest research has found that the Financial Choice Act of 2017 — which has passed along party lines in the House of Representatives and is awaiting action in the Senate — could limit the agency’s ability to enforce the law on behalf of consumers who have been taken advantage of by banks and other financial corporations.

“My study compares the bill to the CFPB’s actual law enforcement track record. In particular, the study asks, ‘How would the CFPB’s enforcement track record have changed if the Choice Act had been in effect from 2012-2016?’” said Peterson. “The short answer is that the law would have wiped out the vast majority of CFPB law enforcement, including seemingly uncontroversial cases like the case against Wells Fargo for creating over two million fake, unauthorized bank accounts.”

Read more about Peterson’s study by clicking here.

Support dreamer fund

The University of Utah Division of Student Affairs is showing support for Dreamers and DACA students by organizing a 3K walk/run on campus. The funds raised will go to the Dreamer Support Fund, which provides scholarships and specialized mentoring and support, from college access to graduation and beyond. Dreamer(s) is an inclusive term for undocumented students with and without Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). DACA was introduced in 2012 to protect immigrants who came to the United States as children and allows them to enroll in college, work legally, and obtain a driver’s license. Before the current administration ended the executive order in support of DACA, nearly 800,000 young people had benefited from the program.

The 3K, will be held Saturday, Dec. 2, at 10 a.m. and is open to anyone. The route circles the campus, beginning and ending at the Student Services Building. Registration begins at 9:15 a.m. Runners start at 10 a.m., and walkers start 10 minutes later. Registration donations are $30 for community members and $15 for students. For a $5 donation, dogs can join. Click here to register.

“We are committed to supporting all of our students, and we invite you to join with us and many others in the administration and faculty who are contributing to student scholarships, including a new fund for Dreamers,” university administrators wrote in a letter sent last year to all members of the U community.

The Dreamer Support Fund is designed to support undocumented students at the University of Utah. Donations contribute to scholarships, emergency support and expanding access to opportunities. The U’s Student Affairs division partnered with the university’s Career and Professional Development Center to organize this event.

“During this turbulent time, Dreamers are scared and nervous, not knowing if or when they will be forced to leave,” said Stan Inman, director of the Career and Professional Development Center. “We have immense empathy for these students, and we wanted to do something to show our support.”

Click here to donate.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Academic Senate meeting and agenda announced
Support Dreamer Fund 3k walk/run
Pioneer Theatre Company holiday book drive
Nominate students to be featured in “Student Innovation @ the U” 2018

Sarah George celebrates 25 years with the Natural History Museum of Utah

Protect yourself from Hepatitis A

National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity
Junior League of Salt Lake hosts a Women Helping Women clothing project
U holiday cards
Customized holiday gifts by University Print & Mail
Send packages home, please
U Staff Scholarship applications open


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING AND AGENDA ANNOUNCED

The next meeting of the Academic Senate is Monday, Dec. 4 from 3-5 p.m. The following items will be discussed, among others:
  • New BA/BS in Criminology & Criminal Justice
  • Update on the south campus housing project
  • New test proctoring procedure
  • Transfer of Disability Studies to the School for Cultural and Social Transformation

The meeting will be in the Moot Courtroom on the 6th floor of the College of Law.

Meetings are open to the public.


SUPPORT DREAMER FUND 3K WALK/RUN

The University of Utah Division of Student Affairs is showing support for Dreamers and DACA students by organizing a 3K walk/run on campus. The funds raised will go to the Dreamer Support Fund, which provides scholarships and specialized mentoring and support, from college access to graduation and beyond. Dreamer(s) is an inclusive term for undocumented students with and without Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). DACA was introduced in 2012 to protect immigrants who came to the United States as children and allows them to enroll in college, work legally, and obtain a driver’s license. Before the current administration ended the executive order in support of DACA, nearly 800,000 young people had benefited from the program.

The 3K, will be held Saturday, Dec. 2, at 10 a.m. and is open to anyone. The route circles the campus, beginning and ending at the Student Services Building. Registration begins at 9:15 a.m. Runners start at 10 a.m., and walkers start 10 minutes later. Registration donations are $30 for community members and $15 for students. For a $5 donation, dogs can join. Click here to register.

Read the full story here.


Pioneer Theatre Company Partners with Granite Education Foundation for Holiday Book Drive
In a tradition that has spanned seven-years, Pioneer Theatre Company (PTC) enlists the help of its holiday patrons to support the services of Granite Education Foundation (GEF) and the “Santa Sacks” project.
PTC and GEF request that patrons attending the December 1-20, 2017 production of Newsies bring a new, unwrapped book for the Santa Sacks.
  • Books need to be new; used books are not needed at this time.
  • Books can be for any age K-12, although K-6 are preferred.
GEF has served students and teachers in Granite School District by facilitating education programs and providing basic needs such as food, clothing, school supplies and more. They provide Christmas to children who would normally not receive gifts. Last year, they distributed 3,200 “Santa Sacks” and expect an increase in requests this year.
PTC, a professional regional theatre, is producing Newsies for the holidays. “It is a show that speaks to the resourcefulness of young people (the “newsies”) in times of poverty and want,” said director Karen Azenberg. “These circumstances still exist today, but one way out is by fostering a love for reading and learning. We hope the book drive helps instill that love in children who might not otherwise be given the opportunity to fall in love with books.”
Purchase tickets for Newsies here.

Nominate students to be featured in “Student Innovation @ the U” 2018

Please nominate one or more students at the U to be featured in the next edition of “Student Innovation @ the U.”

Submit nominations here. Nominations are due Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2017.

Lassonde produces this annual publication to celebrate students from all departments who are innovating and making an impact. We feature student inventors, artists, researchers, athletes and entrepreneurs. Click here to see the current edition. Recent graduates are eligible to be featured if they were enrolled and working on the related project in spring 2017.


Sarah George Celebrates 25 Years with the Natural History Museum of Utah

Natural History Museum of Utah staff and board members surprised Sarah George Nov 17th with a celebratory cake to mark her 25 years as the executive director of the museum.  Over the past quarter century, Sarah has lead a talented team to transform the Museum to be a state treasure, a travel destination, and to help strengthen Utah’s museum community. Staff and board members described Sarah as a visionary and thoughtful leader and are grateful for her service and honored to work with her.


PROTECT YOURSELF FROM HEPATITIS A

Utah is among several states experiencing a surge in Hepatitis A cases. Those at highest risk are the homeless, individuals who use injection and non-injection drugs, those who are incarcerated and their close contacts. Those who have close contact with these high risk groups can protect themselves by practicing good hand hygiene and considering Hepatitis A vaccination.

Be sure to wash your hands after using the restroom and before preparing food or eating:

  1. Wet your hands and apply soap.
  2. Scrub your hands thoroughly for at least 20 seconds. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers and under your nails.
  3. Rinse your hands well.
  4. Dry your hands using a clean towel, or air dry them.

If you may be at risk and would like to receive Hepatitis A vaccination you can:

  • Call 385-468-SHOT (7468) to make an appointment at a Salt Lake County Health Department immunization clinic
  • Contact your health care provider
  • Visit your local pharmacy

For more information, visit CDC.gov/hepatitis.


NATIONAL CENTER FOR FACULTY DEVELOPMENT & DIVERSITY

All graduate students, postdocs and faculty: Did you know that you have access to a wonderful online mentoring program to support you in your scholarship at no cost?

The Office for Equity and Diversity and the Office for Health Equity and Inclusion have sponsored the University of Utah’s Institutional Membership for the National Center for Faculty Development & Diversity (NCFDD). The NCFDD is a nationally-recognized, independent organization that provides online career development and mentoring. Our faculty, graduate students, and postdoctoral scholars now have access to a large variety of services and resources including webinars, multi-week courses, guest lectures, accountability writing buddy matches, discussion forums, dissertation boot camp, and much more. The normal cost for individual NCFDD memberships would be $240 a year for doctoral and postdoctoral scholars and $480 a year for faculty.

To register for your free NCFDD membership, please complete the following

steps:

  1. Visit facultydiversity.org
  2. Click “Activate My Membership”
  3. Enter your account information using your University of Utah email address.

If you have any questions about the membership, please contact Nadia Granados in the College of Education at nadia.granados@utah.edu.


JUNIOR LEAGUE OF SALT LAKE HOSTS A WOMEN HELPING WOMEN CLOTHING PROJECT

The Junior League of Salt Lake hosts a Women Helping Women clothing project to assist women entering the workforce with appropriate clothing. WHW currently needs women’s coats and winter boots. Also needed are large, extra-large and plus sized clothing, purses and new bras, underwear and nylons. All work appropriate items in good, clean condition are also gladly accepted. For more information, visit jlslc.org.

Bring donations to:

Rebecca Dowdell
University Student Apartments, Main Office
1945 E Sunnyside Avenue

Donations accepted M-F from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.


U HOLIDAY CARDS

Get a head start on the holiday season by ordering your greeting cards from University Print & Mail Services. Conveniently place your order online and choose from more than 30 designs, enhanced by your own personalized message. Orders are typically completed in five business days and can be picked up or delivered to your office for free. Making this annual task even easier, Print & Mail can address your envelopes, apply postage and place your cards in the mail for you.

In addition to holiday card designs, University Print & Mail offers several other styles for fall, along with other special occasion cards such as birthday cards, thank you cards, custom-design cards and personalized stationery.

Both personal and office orders are welcome. To view designs online and place your order, visit printing.utah.edu.


Customized Holiday Gifts by University Print & Mail

In need of holiday gifts or giveaways for those special people on your list this year? Let University Print & Mail help you design and customize one-of-a-kind gifts for your department or personal use.

From water bottles to umbrellas, blankets to tote bags, if you can think of it, Print & Mail can create it and make it personal by adding text, logos or specific designs. Most items take approximately five weeks for production and delivery, so order now to ensure your items arrive in time for the holidays. For more information or a custom quote, please contact Roger King at 801-581-3947 or roger.king@utah.edu.

University Print & Mail is an official licensee of the University of Utah and is therefore legally permitted to use and reproduce university-owned trademarks and logos. By supporting official licensees like Print & Mail, you are assured to receive quality products while also supporting student scholarships, athletic programs and other university initiatives.


Send Packages Home, Please

As the holiday season approaches and usage of mail services increases, University Print & Mail Services would like to remind the campus that personal correspondence, packages (e.g. Amazon shipments, etc.) and other deliveries should not be sent to campus addresses but rather, to home addresses.

Because of recent changes with UPS and FedEx rerouting packages through The United States Postal Service (USPS), the volume of packages distributed through Campus Mail has increased significantly, making prompt deliveries more difficult. Pursuant to University policy 3-166, use of the campus mail system is available only to recognized university organizations for official university purposes and is not intended for personal use. Accordingly, faculty and staff should refrain from using the Campus Mail system for receiving or sending personal mail and understand that if they do so, the university is not liable for the contents of those parcels.

Questions or concerns may be directed to Juan Sosa at 801-580-7792 or Juan.Sosa@utah.edu. Thank you for your cooperation, University Print & Mail enjoys serving the campus community and appreciates your ongoing support.


U STAFF SCHOLARSHIPS

Applications are now being accepted for staff development scholarships for the Spring 2018 Semester.

Each scholarship is worth up to $500 and can be used towards the employee’s tuition bill. Scholarships can be used towards professional trainings, symposiums, conferences or workshops and their associated expenses.

The committee will process the scholarship applications in the most fair and judicious manner to benefit the employee, according to the procedures directed by the University of Utah policy. UUSC is an equal opportunity provider.

Qualified applicants must meet the following criteria:

1: Currently working at 75 percent or above Full Time Equivalency (FTE) position (30-40 hours per week).

2: Maintained 75 percent or greater Full Time Equivalency (FTE) in a benefits eligible position for two (2) consecutive years as of Dec. 1, 2017.

3: Have not received a Staff Council Scholarship within the past two years.

Current Staff Council Members are not eligible.

Click here to apply. Applications are due by 11:50 p.m.(MST) on Dec. 1, 2017.

Incomplete applications will not be considered.


Student Life

JUMP TO:
Academic Senate meeting and agenda announced
Support Dreamer Fund 3k walk/run
Pioneer Theatre Company holiday book drive

Nominate students to be featured in “Student Innovation @ the U” 2018

Protect yourself from Hepatitis A

Junior League of Salt Lake hosts a Women Helping Women clothing project
U holiday cards
Customized holiday gifts by University Print & Mail


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING AND AGENDA ANNOUNCED

The next meeting of the Academic Senate is Monday, Dec. 4 from 3-5 p.m. The following items will be discussed, among others:
  • New BA/BS in Criminology & Criminal Justice
  • Update on the south campus housing project
  • New test proctoring procedure
  • Transfer of Disability Studies to the School for Cultural and Social Transformation

The meeting will be in the Moot Courtroom on the 6th floor of the College of Law.

Meetings are open to the public.


SUPPORT DREAMER FUND 3K WALK/RUN

The University of Utah Division of Student Affairs is showing support for Dreamers and DACA students by organizing a 3K walk/run on campus. The funds raised will go to the Dreamer Support Fund, which provides scholarships and specialized mentoring and support, from college access to graduation and beyond. Dreamer(s) is an inclusive term for undocumented students with and without Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). DACA was introduced in 2012 to protect immigrants who came to the United States as children and allows them to enroll in college, work legally, and obtain a driver’s license. Before the current administration ended the executive order in support of DACA, nearly 800,000 young people had benefited from the program.

The 3K, will be held Saturday, Dec. 2, at 10 a.m. and is open to anyone. The route circles the campus, beginning and ending at the Student Services Building. Registration begins at 9:15 a.m. Runners start at 10 a.m., and walkers start 10 minutes later. Registration donations are $30 for community members and $15 for students. For a $5 donation, dogs can join. Click here to register.

Read the full story here.


Pioneer Theatre Company Partners with Granite Education Foundation for Holiday Book Drive
In a tradition that has spanned seven-years, Pioneer Theatre Company (PTC) enlists the help of its holiday patrons to support the services of Granite Education Foundation (GEF) and the “Santa Sacks” project.
PTC and GEF request that patrons attending the December 1-20, 2017 production of Newsies bring a new, unwrapped book for the Santa Sacks.
  • Books need to be new; used books are not needed at this time.
  • Books can be for any age K-12, although K-6 are preferred.
GEF has served students and teachers in Granite School District by facilitating education programs and providing basic needs such as food, clothing, school supplies and more. They provide Christmas to children who would normally not receive gifts. Last year, they distributed 3,200 “Santa Sacks” and expect an increase in requests this year.
PTC, a professional regional theatre, is producing Newsies for the holidays. “It is a show that speaks to the resourcefulness of young people (the “newsies”) in times of poverty and want,” said director Karen Azenberg. “These circumstances still exist today, but one way out is by fostering a love for reading and learning. We hope the book drive helps instill that love in children who might not otherwise be given the opportunity to fall in love with books.”
Purchase tickets for Newsies here.

Nominate students to be featured in “Student Innovation @ the U” 2018

Please nominate one or more students at the U to be featured in the next edition of “Student Innovation @ the U.”

Submit nominations here. Nominations are due Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2017.

Lassonde produces this annual publication to celebrate students from all departments who are innovating and making an impact. We feature student inventors, artists, researchers, athletes and entrepreneurs. Click here to see the current edition. Recent graduates are eligible to be featured if they were enrolled and working on the related project in spring 2017.


PROTECT YOURSELF FROM HEPATITIS A

Utah is among several states experiencing a surge in Hepatitis A cases. Those at highest risk are the homeless, individuals who use injection and non-injection drugs, those who are incarcerated and their close contacts. Those who have close contact with these high risk groups can protect themselves by practicing good hand hygiene and considering Hepatitis A vaccination.

Be sure to wash your hands after using the restroom and before preparing food or eating:

  1. Wet your hands and apply soap.
  2. Scrub your hands thoroughly for at least 20 seconds. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers and under your nails.
  3. Rinse your hands well.
  4. Dry your hands using a clean towel, or air dry them.

If you may be at risk and would like to receive Hepatitis A vaccination you can:

  • Call 385-468-SHOT (7468) to make an appointment at a Salt Lake County Health Department immunization clinic
  • Contact your health care provider
  • Visit your local pharmacy

For more information, visit CDC.gov/hepatitis.


JUNIOR LEAGUE OF SALT LAKE HOSTS A WOMEN HELPING WOMEN CLOTHING PROJECT

The Junior League of Salt Lake hosts a Women Helping Women clothing project to assist women entering the workforce with appropriate clothing. WHW currently needs women’s coats and winter boots. Also needed are large, extra-large and plus sized clothing, purses and new bras, underwear and nylons. All work appropriate items in good, clean condition are also gladly accepted. For more information, visit jlslc.org.

Bring donations to:

Rebecca Dowdell
University Student Apartments, Main Office
1945 E Sunnyside Avenue

Donations accepted M-F from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.


U HOLIDAY CARDS

Get a head start on the holiday season by ordering your greeting cards from University Print & Mail Services. Conveniently place your order online and choose from more than 30 designs, enhanced by your own personalized message. Orders are typically completed in five business days and can be picked up or delivered to your office for free. Making this annual task even easier, Print & Mail can address your envelopes, apply postage and place your cards in the mail for you.

In addition to holiday card designs, University Print & Mail offers several other styles for fall, along with other special occasion cards such as birthday cards, thank you cards, custom-design cards and personalized stationery.

Both personal and office orders are welcome. To view designs online and place your order, visit printing.utah.edu.


Customized Holiday Gifts by University Print & Mail

In need of holiday gifts or giveaways for those special people on your list this year? Let University Print & Mail help you design and customize one-of-a-kind gifts for your department or personal use.

From water bottles to umbrellas, blankets to tote bags, if you can think of it, Print & Mail can create it and make it personal by adding text, logos or specific designs. Most items take approximately five weeks for production and delivery, so order now to ensure your items arrive in time for the holidays. For more information or a custom quote, please contact Roger King at 801-581-3947 or roger.king@utah.edu.

University Print & Mail is an official licensee of the University of Utah and is therefore legally permitted to use and reproduce university-owned trademarks and logos. By supporting official licensees like Print & Mail, you are assured to receive quality products while also supporting student scholarships, athletic programs and other university initiatives.


 

Highlighted Events

PIONEER GARDEN VOLUNTEER SESSIONS
Mondays | 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Pioneer Gardens
Tuesdays | 4:30-6 p.m.
Pioneer Gardens 
Wednesdays | 3-5 p.m.
Sill Center Garden
Thursdays | 4-5 p.m.
Pioneer Garden
Fridays | 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Pioneer Garden

Join the Edible Campus Gardens for a lovely morning or evening of gardening. Projects could include harvesting, trellising, weeding, pruning, planting and learning gardening techniques. No prior gardening experience necessary.

View more information about volunteering with the Edible Campus Gardens here.


FALL FREE YOGA
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Fridays | 12:05 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50 minute yoga sessions from Aug. 30 to Dec. 13, 2017 on the Garden Level.
  • Wednesdays, 12:05 p.m.
  • *Fridays, 12:05 p.m.*

*Friday sessions began Sept. 29*

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. This is a great opportunity to stretch and relax during the workday.

Please bring your own yoga mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check-out at the front desk.

Please provide feedback here.

Students from Yoga Assets will lead us through the yoga practice. Yoga Assets provides yoga teacher training in Salt Lake City. These events enable Yoga Assets students to fulfill their required volunteer hours.

Anyone associated with the University of Utah may attend.

Please note that yoga is cancelled:

  • Nov. 22 – Day before Thanksgiving
  • Nov. 23 – Day after Thanksgiving

FALL CEPD DISCUSSION GROUP
Every other Wednesday | 1-2 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library, Room 1140

Join the Center for Ecological Planning and Design (CEPD) for a bi-weekly discussion group. The CEPD is a campus-wide interdisciplinary center affiliated with the Global Change and Sustainability Center and the College of Architecture + Planning that aims to provide a hub for thinking and research on the built environment and communities. Discussions will be based around readings, videos, etc. that help us better understand the complexities of human settlements through diverse lenses provided by the sciences, social sciences, engineering, design fields and humanities.

Topics will be chosen at the prior meeting and posted online here. All students and faculty are invited to attend. Drop by for one discussion that interests you, or attend all.

More information can be found at cepd.cap.utah.edu under the activity tab.


Bowling Tournament
Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017
Union Bowling Lanes
Calling all bowlers…or pseudo-bowlers…there is still time to register for our annual bowling tournament coming up this Wednesday.
Check out imleagues.com/utah for more information and registration.
Cost is $6.

CROSSTALK: AN EVENING OF ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC
Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 | 5 p.m.
Dumke Recital Hall

Come hear an evening of groundbreaking original electronic music composed and performed by University of Utah music students. This concert features works for electronics and live instruments.

Click here for more information.


Climbing Condition Class
Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 | 4:30 p.m.
Eccles Student Life Center, Spirit Studio
Drop in and check out one of our more unique, and increasingly popular classes that focuses on climbing condition.
This class is FREE if you already have access to the Student Life Center (must have access to the SLC).  Arrive early as spots are limited and no registration is required.

ZIMSGIVING SWEEPSTAKES
Through Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017

Share the ride and win! When you post a new ride on the U’s private Zimride network between Nov. 1-30, you will automatically be entered into the 2017 Zimsgiving Sweepstakes and have a chance to win a $250 Amazon gift card or 1 of 10 $50 Amazon gift cards.

Post your ride today at  zimride.com/utah.


‘The Global Resurgence of Violent Extremism: A Panel Discussion’
Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 | 5-7 p.m.
College of Social Work, Okazaki Community Meeting Room

The annual Dolowitz Lecture in Human Rights was established in 2007 in the International Studies Program at the University of Utah. Given the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia and beyond, this year’s presentation will take the form of a panel discussion. Academic, civic and student leaders will address the historical and contemporary dynamics of violent extremism in the U.S. and around the globe. At issue are questions of ethnic nationalism, free speech, intolerance and ideologies that justify or perpetuate violence. At stake is the very possibility of respectful and peaceful dialogue.

For complete info about event panelists, moderator and location, click here.

Do you have questions that you would like the panelists to address? Submit in advance to ias@utah.edu.


UTAH PHILHARMONIA: ECHOES FROM THE PAST WITH OLYMPUS HIGH SCHOOL GUEST
Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 | 7:30 p.m.
Libby Gardner Concert Hall

Echoes from the Past will bring to life the music of Jennifer Higdon, Aaron Copland, and Ralph Vaughan Williams. The Utah Philharmonia, along with special guests from Olympus High School, welcome you to this final concert of the semester.

Arts Pass event: Free to U students with UCard
General admission: $12.50
Other students: $6.50
Faculty/staff/seniors: $6.50

Click here to purchase tickets.


Lyric Opera Ensemble: Minotti’s ‘Amahl and the Night Visitors’ and ‘A Christmas Carol’
Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 | 7:30 p.m.
Salt Lake Community College, Grand Theatre

Experience two operas in one evening with a combination of “Amahl and the Night Visitors” and “A Christmas Carol.”

First audiences will meet Amahl, a boy who can only walk with a crutch and has a problem with telling tall tales. He meets three kings who were on their way to witness the birth of the Christ child when they appeared at Amahl’s door seeking rest. Their visit leads Amahl and his mother on an unexpected journey to find happiness.

Next, enjoy an original opera by University of Utah students Michael Leavitt and Anthony Buck in an adaptation of the Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol.” Follow Ebenezer Scrooge as he learns the importance of generosity and kindness after being shown his past, present and future on one Christmas Eve.

General admission: $20
Senior discount (60+): $17

Click here to purchase tickets.


SENDsations Bouldering Competition
Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 | 1–8 p.m.
Eccles Student Life Center
Join us at the Summit on Dec. 2 for the 3rd Annual SENDsations Bouldering Competition. The competition is open to all current U students and to any member of Campus Recreation Services.
All skill levels, from beginner to advanced, are welcome to join. The competition runs from 1-8 p.m. with two different heats to choose from followed by the finals.
Register here and $12 per person includes a t-shirt.

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND ART FAIR
Saturday, Dec. 2-Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017
Red Butte Garden

Kick-off the holiday season and find unique holiday gifts made by local artists. You’ll find handcrafted jewelry, pottery, fiber art, glass, photography and more.

FREE garden admission Dec. 2-3, thanks to Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks.

And to make your shopping weekend even brighter, on Dec. 2-3, all items sold at the Red Butte Garden Gift Shop will be marked down 10 percent.

For more information, go here.


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, Dec. 4, 2017 | 3 p.m.
Moot Courtroom, College of Law

The next Academic Senate meeting will be Monday, Dec. 4 at 3 p.m. in the Moot Courtroom of the College of Law. Senate meetings are open to the public.

The agenda will be posted approximately one week before here.


Salt Lake Tribune Editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce: ‘The Salt Lake Tribune: Utah’s Independent Voice’
Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017 | 3 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium, level 1

Join the Friends of the Library Lecture.

Light refreshments will be served. 


Faculty AND Staff Appreciation Night
Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017 | 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.
University Campus Store

On Thursday, Dec. 7, the University Campus Store will host its annual Faculty and Staff Appreciation Night, showing gratitude and support for the university community by offering a discount on staff purchases all day, from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Bring your family and join your friends at the Campus Store for Starbucks refreshments, amazing prizes and a fun photo booth, running from 5–7 p.m. In addition, get your holiday shopping done early with new Utes outerwear and apparel, toys, games and gift items, and as an added benefit have all of your purchases gift-wrapped for free. And, as the store’s gift to you, every staff purchase exceeding $20 will be accompanied by a free Utah beanie.


WINTER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION
Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017 |10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Red Butte Garden

Bring your kids to the Children’s Garden and create head wreaths, winter candles, and more. Sip hot chocolate and make a new-year wish at the Yule Log.

Garden members $3
General public $3 + general admission

Click here for more information.


118TH ANNUAL AUDUBON SOCIETY CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT
Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017 | 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
Red Butte Garden

Free with regular garden admission and free for garden members.

Be a part of the Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – the longest running citizen-science survey in the world providing critical data on bird population trends.

Space is limited and registration began Nov 20. 


GLASS ART SHOW
Through Dec. 17, 2017
Red Butte Garden

The Glass Art Guild of Utah returns to Red Butte Garden for another stunning show of kiln work and blown glass. Large and small pieces including garden art, decorative boxes, sculptural works and jewelry pieces will display the brilliant colors of this delightful medium. Items displayed will be available for sale.

Meet the artists reception on Saturday, Nov. 18 from 2-5 p.m.

Click here for more information and pricing.


VIKINGS: BEYOND THE LEGEND
Through Monday, Jan. 1, 2018
Natural History Museum of Utah

What if the blood-thirsty plunderers you once thought you knew, were really just misunderstood explorers, farmers and traders?

Come explore Vikings to discover the truth about the Vikings age and dispel long-held stereotypes about its people, traditions and influence. Find yourself captivated by more than 400 authentic artifacts- some never before seen outside Scandinavia — including jewelry, funeral urns, weapons, game pieces, clothing and even a piece of 1,000-year-old Viking bread.

When you visit Vikings at Natural History Museum of Utah you will:

  • Imagine a Viking voyage as you marvel a full-scale replica of a Viking ship
  • Play a digital version of a popular Viking strategy game that pre-dates chess
  • Test the balance between the blade and handle of a replica Viking sword
  • Excavate a spectacular Viking burial boat, layer by layer, on an interactive touch table

Click here for more information and go here for hours and admission prices.


GRAND ROUNDS: RESEARCH REPRODUCIBILITY
Through Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Join us for a year of programming around research reproducibility. From September until June we will be holding weekly discussions, an immersive workshop and conference.

Follow the hashtag #MakeResearchTrue on Twitter.

For more information, go here.


Campus Events

PIONEER GARDEN VOLUNTEER SESSIONS
Mondays | 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Pioneer Gardens
Tuesdays | 4:30-6 p.m.
Pioneer Gardens 
Wednesdays | 3-5 p.m.
Sill Center Garden
Thursdays | 4-5 p.m.
Pioneer Garden
Fridays | 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Pioneer Garden

Join the Edible Campus Gardens for a lovely morning or evening of gardening. Projects could include harvesting, trellising, weeding, pruning, planting and learning gardening techniques. No prior gardening experience necessary.

View more information about volunteering with the Edible Campus Gardens here.


FALL FREE YOGA
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Fridays | 12:05 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50 minute yoga sessions from Aug. 30 to Dec. 13, 2017 on the Garden Level.
  • Wednesdays, 12:05 p.m.
  • *Fridays, 12:05 p.m.*

*Friday sessions began Sept. 29*

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. This is a great opportunity to stretch and relax during the workday.

Please bring your own yoga mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check-out at the front desk.

Please provide feedback here.

Students from Yoga Assets will lead us through the yoga practice. Yoga Assets provides yoga teacher training in Salt Lake City. These events enable Yoga Assets students to fulfill their required volunteer hours.

Anyone associated with the University of Utah may attend.

Please note that yoga is cancelled:

  • Nov. 22 – Day before Thanksgiving
  • Nov. 23 – Day after Thanksgiving

FALL CEPD DISCUSSION GROUP
Every other Wednesday | 1-2 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library, Room 1140

Join the Center for Ecological Planning and Design (CEPD) for a bi-weekly discussion group. The CEPD is a campus-wide interdisciplinary center affiliated with the Global Change and Sustainability Center and the College of Architecture + Planning that aims to provide a hub for thinking and research on the built environment and communities. Discussions will be based around readings, videos, etc. that help us better understand the complexities of human settlements through diverse lenses provided by the sciences, social sciences, engineering, design fields and humanities.

Topics will be chosen at the prior meeting and posted online here. All students and faculty are invited to attend. Drop by for one discussion that interests you, or attend all.

More information can be found at cepd.cap.utah.edu under the activity tab.


Bowling Tournament
Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017
Union Bowling Lanes
Calling all bowlers…or pseudo-bowlers…there is still time to register for our annual bowling tournament coming up this Wednesday.
Check out imleagues.com/utah for more information and registration.
Cost is $6.

CROSSTALK: AN EVENING OF ELECTROACOUSTIC MUSIC
Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 | 5 p.m.
Dumke Recital Hall

Come hear an evening of groundbreaking original electronic music composed and performed by University of Utah music students. This concert features works for electronics and live instruments.

Click here for more information.


Climbing Condition Class
Wednesday, Nov. 29, 2017 | 4:30 p.m.
Eccles Student Life Center, Spirit Studio
Drop in and check out one of our more unique, and increasingly popular classes that focuses on climbing condition.
This class is FREE if you already have access to the Student Life Center (must have access to the SLC).  Arrive early as spots are limited and no registration is required.

ZIMSGIVING SWEEPSTAKES
Through Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017

Share the ride and win! When you post a new ride on the U’s private Zimride network between Nov. 1-30, you will automatically be entered into the 2017 Zimsgiving Sweepstakes and have a chance to win a $250 Amazon gift card or 1 of 10 $50 Amazon gift cards.

Post your ride today at  zimride.com/utah.


‘The Global Resurgence of Violent Extremism: A Panel Discussion’
Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 | 5-7 p.m.
College of Social Work, Okazaki Community Meeting Room

The annual Dolowitz Lecture in Human Rights was established in 2007 in the International Studies Program at the University of Utah. Given the recent events in Charlottesville, Virginia and beyond, this year’s presentation will take the form of a panel discussion. Academic, civic and student leaders will address the historical and contemporary dynamics of violent extremism in the U.S. and around the globe. At issue are questions of ethnic nationalism, free speech, intolerance and ideologies that justify or perpetuate violence. At stake is the very possibility of respectful and peaceful dialogue.

For complete info about event panelists, moderator and location, click here.

Do you have questions that you would like the panelists to address? Submit in advance to ias@utah.edu.


UTAH PHILHARMONIA: ECHOES FROM THE PAST WITH OLYMPUS HIGH SCHOOL GUEST
Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 | 7:30 p.m.
Libby Gardner Concert Hall

Echoes from the Past will bring to life the music of Jennifer Higdon, Aaron Copland, and Ralph Vaughan Williams. The Utah Philharmonia, along with special guests from Olympus High School, welcome you to this final concert of the semester.

Arts Pass event: Free to U students with UCard
General admission: $12.50
Other students: $6.50
Faculty/staff/seniors: $6.50

Click here to purchase tickets.


Lyric Opera Ensemble: Minotti’s ‘Amahl and the Night Visitors’ and ‘A Christmas Carol’
Thursday, Nov. 30, 2017 | 7:30 p.m.
Salt Lake Community College, Grand Theatre

Experience two operas in one evening with a combination of “Amahl and the Night Visitors” and “A Christmas Carol.”

First audiences will meet Amahl, a boy who can only walk with a crutch and has a problem with telling tall tales. He meets three kings who were on their way to witness the birth of the Christ child when they appeared at Amahl’s door seeking rest. Their visit leads Amahl and his mother on an unexpected journey to find happiness.

Next, enjoy an original opera by University of Utah students Michael Leavitt and Anthony Buck in an adaptation of the Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol.” Follow Ebenezer Scrooge as he learns the importance of generosity and kindness after being shown his past, present and future on one Christmas Eve.

General admission: $20
Senior discount (60+): $17

Click here to purchase tickets.


SENDsations Bouldering Competition
Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 | 1–8 p.m.
Eccles Student Life Center
Join us at the Summit on Dec. 2 for the 3rd Annual SENDsations Bouldering Competition. The competition is open to all current U students and to any member of Campus Recreation Services.
All skill levels, from beginner to advanced, are welcome to join. The competition runs from 1-8 p.m. with two different heats to choose from followed by the finals.
Register here and $12 per person includes a t-shirt.

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND ART FAIR
Saturday, Dec. 2-Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017
Red Butte Garden

Kick-off the holiday season and find unique holiday gifts made by local artists. You’ll find handcrafted jewelry, pottery, fiber art, glass, photography and more.

FREE garden admission Dec. 2-3, thanks to Salt Lake County Zoo, Arts & Parks.

And to make your shopping weekend even brighter, on Dec. 2-3, all items sold at the Red Butte Garden Gift Shop will be marked down 10 percent.

For more information, go here.


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, Dec. 4, 2017 | 3 p.m.
Moot Courtroom, College of Law

The next Academic Senate meeting will be Monday, Dec. 4 at 3 p.m. in the Moot Courtroom of the College of Law. Senate meetings are open to the public.

The agenda will be posted approximately one week before here.


Salt Lake Tribune Editor Jennifer Napier-Pearce: ‘The Salt Lake Tribune: Utah’s Independent Voice’
Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017 | 3 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium, level 1

Join the Friends of the Library Lecture.

Light refreshments will be served. 


Faculty AND Staff Appreciation Night
Thursday, Dec. 7, 2017 | 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m.
University Campus Store

On Thursday, Dec. 7, the University Campus Store will host its annual Faculty and Staff Appreciation Night, showing gratitude and support for the university community by offering a discount on staff purchases all day, from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Bring your family and join your friends at the Campus Store for Starbucks refreshments, amazing prizes and a fun photo booth, running from 5–7 p.m. In addition, get your holiday shopping done early with new Utes outerwear and apparel, toys, games and gift items, and as an added benefit have all of your purchases gift-wrapped for free. And, as the store’s gift to you, every staff purchase exceeding $20 will be accompanied by a free Utah beanie.


WINTER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION
Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017 |10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Red Butte Garden

Bring your kids to the Children’s Garden and create head wreaths, winter candles, and more. Sip hot chocolate and make a new-year wish at the Yule Log.

Garden members $3
General public $3 + general admission

Click here for more information.


118TH ANNUAL AUDUBON SOCIETY CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT
Saturday, Dec. 16, 2017 | 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
Red Butte Garden

Free with regular garden admission and free for garden members.

Be a part of the Audubon Society Christmas Bird Count – the longest running citizen-science survey in the world providing critical data on bird population trends.

Space is limited and registration began Nov 20. 


GLASS ART SHOW
Through Dec. 17, 2017
Red Butte Garden

The Glass Art Guild of Utah returns to Red Butte Garden for another stunning show of kiln work and blown glass. Large and small pieces including garden art, decorative boxes, sculptural works and jewelry pieces will display the brilliant colors of this delightful medium. Items displayed will be available for sale.

Meet the artists reception on Saturday, Nov. 18 from 2-5 p.m.

Click here for more information and pricing.


VIKINGS: BEYOND THE LEGEND
Through Monday, Jan. 1, 2018
Natural History Museum of Utah

What if the blood-thirsty plunderers you once thought you knew, were really just misunderstood explorers, farmers and traders?

Come explore Vikings to discover the truth about the Vikings age and dispel long-held stereotypes about its people, traditions and influence. Find yourself captivated by more than 400 authentic artifacts- some never before seen outside Scandinavia — including jewelry, funeral urns, weapons, game pieces, clothing and even a piece of 1,000-year-old Viking bread.

When you visit Vikings at Natural History Museum of Utah you will:

  • Imagine a Viking voyage as you marvel a full-scale replica of a Viking ship
  • Play a digital version of a popular Viking strategy game that pre-dates chess
  • Test the balance between the blade and handle of a replica Viking sword
  • Excavate a spectacular Viking burial boat, layer by layer, on an interactive touch table

Click here for more information and go here for hours and admission prices.


GRAND ROUNDS: RESEARCH REPRODUCIBILITY
Through Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Join us for a year of programming around research reproducibility. From September until June we will be holding weekly discussions, an immersive workshop and conference.

Follow the hashtag #MakeResearchTrue on Twitter.

For more information, go here.