2017 PRIDE WEEK

By Hamza Yaqoobi, Office for Equity and Diversity

Julio Salgado, a visual artist who describes himself as an artist who happens to be undocumented and queer, will be on campus as part of the 2017 Pride Week events on Wednesday, October 4, 2017. He will showcase his pop-up art show and lead a discussion and poster workshop titled “I am a Queer Artist of Color and I’m Still Alive.”

Though it was not until about four years ago that Salgado decided to declare himself an artist, he has been expressing himself through art since he was a child. During his first two semesters in college, he focused on the study of art but was soon discouraged when he felt that his identities were not reflected in the courses –  on top of being financially inaccessible. Salgado switched his major to journalism but was able to engage with art in his own way as an editorial cartoonist. This position and his studies in journalism politicized his art.

After graduating college with a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, Salgado continued making political art.  His work is widely used today in activist spaces, especially those that advocate for immigrant and queer rights. His identities as a queer and undocumented person influence and inform his art. “For years I kept these two parts of my identity separate,” Salgado says. “It was much later that I realized how interconnected these are, and I started to be more intentional in my imagery.”

The 2017 Pride Week poster series is an adaptation of six different works by Salgado. Each of these pieces pays homage to different parts of his identity. The main goal, Salgado says, is for his work to highlight the complexities of his identities. While Salgado stresses that his art is only reflective of his own experiences, he hopes that these portrayals can help humanize the experiences of other queer, undocumented people.

Salgado considers himself very lucky to visit universities and give a full background to his art while he is still alive. “A lot of times for queer artists of color it is not until we’re dead that people try to understand what we meant by a drawing or piece of writing,” says Salgado.

During this more turbulent political climate, Salgado works to inspire queer and immigrant students to stand up for themselves and speak their truth in their own ways. He passionately states, “one thing I will not do no matter the outcome of DACA or rights removed from the LGBTQ community go back into the closet. I would like to one day stop having to explain my humanity.”

For more information on Julio Salgado’s Pop-up art show and workshop, and for the full Pride Week line up, go here.

ESCAPING WILDFIRES

By Lisa Potter, science writer, University Marketing & Communications

Every year, tens of thousands of wildland firefighters risk their lives to save timber, forests and property from destruction. Before battling the flames, they identify areas to where they can retreat, and designate the best escape routes to get from the fire line to these safety zones. Currently, firefighters make these decisions on the ground, using expert knowledge of fire behavior and assessing their ability to traverse a landscape.

Now, a University of Utah-led study has developed a mapping tool that could one day help fire crews make crucial safety decisions with an eagle’s eye view.

The new study is the first attempt to map escape routes for wildland fire fighters from an aerial perspective. The researchers used Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) technology to analyze the terrain slope, ground surface roughness and vegetation density of a fire-prone region in central Utah, and assessed how each landscape condition impeded a person’s ability to travel.

This is one of the thousands of simulations evaluating potential escape routes within the study area.

“Firefighters have a great sense for interactions between fire and landscape conditions. We hope to offer to them an extra tool using information collected on a broad scale,” says lead author Michael Campbell, doctoral candidate in the U’s Department of Geography.

Department of Geography professor and co-author, Philip Dennison, adds, “Finding the fastest way to get to a safety zone can be made a lot more difficult by factors like steep terrain, dense brush, and poor visibility due to smoke. This new technology is one of the ways we can provide an extra margin of safety for firefighters.”

The findings were published online on Sept. 26, 2017, in the International Journal of Wildland Fire.

Mapping escape routes  

Firefighters identify escape routes by assessing the landscape on the ground. The three conditions that determine how efficiently a firefighter can move through an area are terrain steepness, or slope, vegetation density, especially of plants in the understory and ground surface roughness, such as a boulder field or a well-maintained dirt road.

The study used a combination of LiDAR, geographic information systems, and human volunteers to examine how landscape conditions impact a person’s ability to travel within Levan Wildland Management Area in the foothills of Utah’s Wasatch Mountains.

The volunteers timed themselves walking along 22 paths that the researchers designed to capture a variety of slopes, ground surface roughness and vegetation densities. The researchers compared these travel times to LiDAR-derived estimates of the three landscape conditions along the transects, and extracted their effects on travel rates.

The analysis revealed that the fastest travel rates with respect to slope are slightly downhill, and going steeper uphill or downhill reduces travel speed on average. As vegetation density increases, travel rate decrease and as ground surface roughness increases, travel rates also decline.

“A lot of it is intuitive; if you’re walking through dense vegetation, you’re going to move more slowly than you would through a field of grass. But we found that no-one had quantified just how much vegetation density or surface roughness can slow you down,” says Campbell.

After assessing travel impedance, Campbell ran thousands of simulations evaluating potential escape routes within the study area. He chose random starting points representing a crew location, and random end points representing a safety zone. By plugging the effect of slope, ground surface roughness and vegetation density on travel rates into a route-finding algorithm, he successfully identified the most efficient routes.

The volunteers timed themselves walking along paths that the researchers designed to capture a variety of slopes, ground surface roughness, and vegetation densities.

Quantifying landscapes from the sky

Currently, firefighters base all of their decisions on ground-level information using fire safety protocols, such as the Incidence Response Pocket Guide. The guidelines recommend avoiding steep slopes, dense vegetation, and rough ground surfaces when designating an escape route.

“It’s built into the safety protocol, but there are no numbers behind it. What is steep? Is it steep uphill? Downhill? What is dense vegetation?” asks Campbell. “Using LIDAR information, we were able to turn it from these subjective judgement calls into something more robust and quantitative.”

LiDAR is unique in that it has the ability to map both understory vegetation and ground surface roughness at very high levels of precision. The technology is sensitive enough to pick out individual bumps, rocks and boulders on the ground surface with a resolution of 10 cm per pixel.

The result of a LiDAR data collection effort is a 3-D ‘point-cloud’ containing millions of points that record the longitude, latitude and elevation of the structural features that make up a given landscape. When combined with the LiDAR-derived landscape conditions, firefighters can apply existing route-finding algorithms to the data to identify the path of least resistance.

By plugging the effect of slope, ground surface roughness and vegetation density on travel rates into a route-finding algorithm, Campbell successfully identified the most efficient routes.

LiDAR data currently aren’t well-suited to real time mapping of evacuation routes, because they can take a long time to process and coverage is limited in some regions. However, land managers in areas with high wildfire risk could prepare the data ahead of the fire. With the LiDAR information in hand, firefighters could run the route-finding software to identify escape routes in real-time.

“The goal is to turn this into a tool that can be implemented in a realistic sense,” says Campbell. “Because our work is sponsored by the U.S. Forest Service, we hope to get our tools into the hands of people on the ground, and turn it into something that’s used in a fire-fighting scenario.”

Bret W. Butler of the USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station in Missoula, Montana, also contributed to this work.

A Healthier U

How to integrate Intuitive Eating into your life

 Have you ever heard the phrase, “Eat when you’re hungry and stop when you’re full”?  This mentality is the focus of intuitive eating.  Children are very good at self-regulating their intake by eating when they are hungry as they respond to biological signals that drive them to eat.  As adults, sometimes we ignore these signals either because we are too busy to eat or we’re trying to lose weight.  Children also stop eating when they are satisfied.  Many adults would find that if they could train themselves to stop eating when they are comfortable — not full, they would be better able to manage their weight. 

Intuitive eating is an approach that teaches you how to create a healthy relationship with your food, mind, and body with the goal of ultimately becoming the expert of your own body as you become better at responding to your internal hunger and satiety cues.

FACTS ABOUT FAT

Fats have often been cast as a villain when it comes to a healthy diet. But they are important when it comes to nutrition and your overall health.

Read the full story here.

3 CONSIDERATIONS FOR CHOOSING THE RIGHT MATTRESS

A big part of getting a good night’s sleep is what you sleep on. Having the right mattress can lead to better quality sleep and all the health benefits that come with it. On today’s Health Minute, sleep expert Dr. Milton Chua shares the three things you need to know to pick the best mattress for your best night’s sleep.

Listen to the full story here.

For more expert health news and information, click here.

Student Life

JUMP TO:

U commits to renewable energy
U statement on sexual violence announcement
2017 Ivory Prize recipient: Nick Knight
Apply to be an orientation leader

Equifax Breach: How to protect yourself against identity theft and fraud
October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month
Health care and homelessness
U leading clinical trial to treat CMV and combat hearing loss in children
Tickets on sale for Red Butte Garden’s ‘Garden After Dark’
Fall Break intensive course


U commits to renewable energy

The University of Utah is pleased to announce that, after receiving several responses to its request for proposals, it is finalizing agreements to supply 50 percent of its electricity from renewable energy sources. The accepted proposal is a joint proposal from Cyrq Energy, a Utah company based in Salt Lake City, and Berkshire Hathaway Energy Renewables. The proposal is to provide 20 megawatts of geothermal energy and 10 megawatts of solar energy to the university for the next 25 years. The project would result in a 25 percent reduction of the university’s overall greenhouse gas emissions.

“This project connects the university to a diverse array of energy resources that are important to the economic health of our state,” said U President David W. Pershing. “Both our Energy and Geoscience Institute and our Department of Geology and Geophysics are known for their work on geothermal resources. We are pleased to be part of a project that so closely aligns with our research strengths and allows the university to take a dramatic step forward on its climate commitment and toward improving air quality.”

“Cyrq is honored to partner with Berkshire Hathaway Energy, Rocky Mountain Power and the U on this exceptional project,” said Nick Goodman, Cyrq CEO.

“Rocky Mountain Power is pleased to help facilitate this project between the University of Utah, Cyrq and BHER to increase the renewable footprint and facilitate ongoing research at the university,” said Gary Hoogeveen, senior vice president and chief commercial officer at Rocky Mountain Power.

In order to be finalized, all agreements will be subject to review in the coming months by the Public Service Commission.


2017 IVORY PRIZE RECIPIENT: NICK KNIGHT

The 2017 Ivory Prize recipient is Nick Knight, a third-year student at the University of Utah. Knight has gone above and beyond in his work to develop resources and solutions aimed at addressing intergenerational, systemic issues related to individual and public health, education and social justice – particularly as they pertain to food insecurity. He is the executive director of Feed U Pantry, an on-campus food pantry, and has worked with university leadership in formulating strategies to alleviate food insecurity among members of the campus community. Feed U has served more than 1,000 people with over 10,500 pounds of food to date. Knight is the embodiment of selfless leadership this world needs.


U STATEMENT ON SEXUAL VIOLENCE ANNOUNCEMENT

We do not anticipate that today’s announcement by the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights regarding sexual violence on college campuses will significantly impact the existing policies at the University of Utah. Our policies aim to both protect victims and provide due process to those involved. However, we will review the guidelines and evaluate whether any aspects of our policies could benefit from changes in the coming year, in consultation with our faculty, staff and students. The safety and well-being of our students remains our top priority. We will continue to provide victim advocate and counseling services, protective measures, bystander intervention trainings and other awareness programs.


APPLY TO BE AN ORIENTATION LEADER

Do you want to be involved in making an impact on student’s lives? Apply to be an Orientation Leader.

Being an Orientation Leader position is one of the most rewarding leadership positions on campus. By being an Orientation Leader you will make an impact on new first-year and transfer students as well as lifelong memories and friends. You can apply to be an Orientation Leader at orientation.utah.edu. Some benefits that come with being an Orientation Leader are housing provided during the summer, exposure to leadership opportunities, connections with multiple offices and organizations at the University of Utah, as well as diversity training. Some qualifications for the position are Utah school pride, commitment to making a difference in students’ lives, professionalism, leadership development, resume builder, commitment to creating an inclusive environment, and the ability to work effectively in teams.

As an Orientation Leader you will have face-to-face interactions with incoming new students. It will be your job to help welcome thousands of new students to the University of Utah. Deadline to apply is Monday, Oct. 16.

Click on this link for a snapshot of what it’s like to be an OL.


Equifax Breach: How to protect yourself against identity theft and fraud

Gone are the days of picking locks and stealing cash/jewels/stocks from secret safes behind the picture on the wall. A new and efficient money bully has emerged with the advent of the internet – cyber theft. From the comfort of home, a thief can sit in front of a computer and can obtain access to vital personal and financial information with a little trickery and savvy hacking tricks. Once your personal information is stolen – your life is exposed to the treacherous world of fraud.

I am sure everyone has heard about the Equifax breach of 143 million credit files. Since social security numbers were compromised in this data breach, this is the biggest data breach ever. Generally, most data breaches do not include entire social security numbers. This one did. Criminals can now wait months and years to try and steal someone’s identity. The number compromised is beyond comprehension. You are talking about half the US population. This means most of us are included in this data breach. Everyone will now have to take steps to watch their identity.

Here are four simple ideas to help protect yourself from this new age cyber-onslaught of ID theft-fraud.

Click here to read the full article.


October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month

The internet is a huge part of life at work and at home, and no one is immune to cyber threats. That’s why for the fourth year in a row, University Information Technology (UIT) is participating in the National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) campaign. It’s everyone’s responsibility to behave safely online, and UIT wants to help you learn how to do so. 

This year, UIT’s message is aligned with the StaySafeOnline.org campaign. The topics to be covered each week include: 

Week 1 (Oct. 2-6): Simple Steps to Online Safety

Week 2 (Oct. 9-13): Cybersecurity in the Workplace is Everyone’s Business

Week 3 (Oct. 16-20): Today’s Predictions for Tomorrow’s Internet

Week 4 (Oct. 23-27): Protecting Critical Infrastructure from Cyber Threats

UIT invites you to visit our NCSAM website each week as we learn together about ways to stay informed, as well as best practices for how to stay safe online.


Health care and homelessness

A team of researchers from the University of Utah and University of North Texas have received a $100,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to study the impact of the continuum of care approach in improving health and health equity services for people who are homeless.

The team is led by Jesus N. Valero, assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Utah, and Hee Soun Jan, associate professor in the Department of Public Administration at the University of North Texas. Adi V. Gundlapalli, physician and professor of internal medicine and biomedical informatics research at the U’s School of Medicine and chief health informatics officer at VA Salt Lake City Health Care System, is the senior investigator on the project.

The grant is provided through the Evidence for Action program, which is supported by the foundation and housed in the Center for Health and Community at the University of California, San Francisco.

The researchers will look specifically at health care services for people who are homeless in Salt Lake County, Utah, and Dallas, Texas, Valero said. They are working with local governmental and non-profit entities in each area.

In its proposal, the team said many studies have shown that people experiencing homelessness are at high risk of multiple preventable diseases and are less likely to access health care systems than most other populations. They also need help with stable housing, reliable transportation, employment opportunities and creating a health family environment.

The continuum of care approach was crafted in response to those many needs. The one-year study will look at whether the novel response works and the challenges that impede its effectiveness.

For more than 40 years, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has worked to improve health and health care. The foundation is working with others to build a national culture of health, enabling everyone in America to live longer, healthier lives.


U leading clinical trial to treat CMV and combat hearing loss in children

A National Institutes of Health-supported nationwide clinical trial will test a novel approach to combat hearing loss in children infected by a relatively unknown virus, cytomegalovirus (CMV). The University of Utah Health-led study will determine whether antiviral therapy can halt progressive hearing loss in children with a confirmed CMV infection. CMV is the leading non-genetic cause of hearing loss, contributing from 6 to 30 percent of childhood cases.

“Zika is a huge issue globally but CMV, which also causes microcephaly, is actually a bigger problem in the United States,” says Albert H. Park, lead investigator of the clinical trial, a professor at U of U Health, and a practicing pediatric otolaryngologist at Primary Children’s in Salt Lake City.

Unlike Zika which is transmitted by mosquitos, CMV is passed from person to person by contact with bodily fluids. Although the virus typically causes mild symptoms in children and adults, it can severely impact infants in utero. Each year, about 5,000 babies are born in the United States with permanent problems related to CMV infection. By comparison, 51 U.S. newborns had Zika-related birth defects last year. 

This study is being carried out at 30 sites across the country to specifically evaluate whether antiviral medication prevents CMV-caused hearing loss in newborns from getting worse.


Tickets on sale for Red Butte Garden’s ‘Garden After Dark’

Don’t be late for a very important date.

Join us for an enchanted evening as we journey down the rabbit hole to the whimsical, wonderful world of Wonderland. With the help of the White Rabbit, Mad Hatter, Cheshire Cat, Caterpillar and others, we’ll discover the large role that the natural world plays in making Wonderland a magical place.

With crafts, activities, light displays and more, join us for Garden After Dark, an indoor/outdoor, costume and kid-friendly experience in the garden to celebrate Halloween. 

$6 Garden members / $12 General public / Children age 2 and under free. Click here to purchase tickets.


FALL BREAK INTENSIVE COURSES AVAILABLE

Stay on track to graduate with a Fall Break Intensive Course (Oct. 9-13). Classes are offered Monday through Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. with a one-hour lunch. Intensives are offered on campus as well as at the U’s Sandy Center location. Intensive classes will be as rigorous as a semester-long class and requires attendance at each class session. In addition to time spent in the classroom, students will be required to complete pre and post work.

Explore options at flexibleoptions.utah.edu.

Questions? Call 801-585-9963.

Safe & Sound

Dear University of Utah Colleagues

The university is conducting a peer program review of our health and safety efforts. The review involves organizational alignment, policy and procedure reviews and will include an on-site component.  On October 9 and 10 2017, a review team from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston,  will be in Salt Lake City to meet with our community and look around at some of our facilities. 

The following questions will serve as the basis for their interactions on campus. 

  1. Were you aware the campus safety and health committee updated the campus safety and health policy 3-300, in Fall 2016 and again in Spring 2017?  Do you have any questions or concerns about your specific responsibilities as outlined in 3-300?
  2. Are there specific resources or support you have identified that would help you be successful in your responsibilities for health and safety as outlined in 3-300?
  3. What do you perceive is working well as it relates to safety and health?
  4. Do you perceive there have been improvements since the 2016 campus safety culture survey? (Can you identify any of those specifically)?
  5. If you had the opportunity to request or discuss with senior administrators, one or two gaps related to health and safety and your responsibilities, what might they be?
  6. If you had the opportunity to request or discuss with senior administrators, one or two gaps related to health and safety and the campus in general, what might they be?

If you are scheduled to meet personally (or as part of a group) with the reviewers, these questions/your answers will be the focus of the discussion.  The time slots are tight, there’s much to see and many to meet, so we hope you are able to consider your responses to these questions in advance. 

If you are not able to meet personally with our reviewers, your input is still important to us.  You may provide feedback directly to Patlovich, Scott J Scott.J.Patlovich@uth.tmc.edu.

Your support of and involvement in the University’s health and safety efforts are greatly valued.

Ms. Marty Shaub, CEM
Managing Director, OEHS


Upgraded Laboratory Management System Training

 

To register for one of the trainings click here or scan the QR code.


 

 

HR Updates

National Retirement Security Week Presentations

Human Resources will be hosting a week of presentations related to retirement preparation again this year.  Whether you are just beginning your career, mid-career or nearing retirement, we have a session for you.  Review the session schedule to find presentations that interest you.


Flu Shots at RedMed

Did you miss getting your flu shot at Employee Appreciation Day? Employees can get a flu shot at RedMed for no cost.  Flu shots at RedMed will be reported as WellU completions. Employees and their family members who are enrolled in the Employee Health Care Plan can get flu shots at their doctor’s office or neighborhood pharmacy, as well. All flu shots billed through the health plan will count as a WellU completion.

To schedule an appointment at RedMed, see the web page and scheduler at hr.utah.edu/RedMed/

SHOW YOUR STRIPES

By Amanda Taylor, Alumni Association

The University of Utah’s annual Homecoming celebration began Saturday, Sept. 30, with the Legacy of Lowell Community Service Day and culminates Sunday, Oct. 8, with the end of Parent & Family Weekend following the previous day’s football showdown with Pac-12 peer Stanford University.

The Homecoming 2017 slogan “Show Your Stripes” is a convergence of an old idiom and a U tradition. The week’s theme speaks to proudly displaying your U pride. To “show your stripes” means, “To reveal what one really believes, thinks or wants; to act in accordance with one’s real personality, character or disposition.”

Historically, the University of Utah has had a specific “Utah stripe” on its uniforms, and the 2015 throwback uniforms that featured the stripes were so popular, U Athletics decided to make it a permanent change. Since then, the U has promoted a #UUthrowback hashtag for Homecoming-related shares on social media.

Homecoming Week provides ways for students, alumni and other U fans to celebrate the U’s rich history and traditions of the past and present. Visit alumni.utah.edu/homecoming for more information and event registration.

Oct. 3 House Decorating: Students will participate in the decorating competition on Greek Row and other campus-area locations.

Oct. 5 Songfest: The energy on campus heats up with the annual student Songfest presentation of song-and-dance routines.

Oct. 5 Crimson Rally & Movie Night: The event includes giveaways and an appearance by Head Football Coach Kyle Whittingham. Stay to watch “Spider-Man: Homecoming” on the Rice-Eccles Stadium field.

Oct. 5 Women’s Soccer vs. Stanford: The No. 24-ranked U women’s soccer team hosts No. 2 Stanford at Ute Soccer Field. Show your support for the Utes in this Pac-12 showdown.

Oct. 6-8 Parent & Family Weekend: Families of U students are invited to spend time on campus and take part in Homecoming weekend festivities.

Oct. 7 Scholarship 5K: Fun for the whole family (including a kid-friendly 1K) with food, prizes, and more.

Oct. 7 Football Tailgate and Game vs. Stanford: Get some grub with fellow fans, then cheer on the Utes.

Oct. 8 Women’s Soccer vs. Cal: The No. 24-ranked U women’s soccer team hosts No. 11 Cal. Come out and give the Utes a home-field advantage against their Pac-12 rival.

Hurricane Disaster Donations

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have devastated the U.S. southern states and the University of Utah is partnering with our Alumni Association and the Red Cross to provide relief to those affected. We are asking the U community to donate items to assist with the relief efforts. Join our homecoming efforts to give to those in need.

Oct. 2-6, 2017
9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily
Rice-Eccles Stadium
Southwest entrance

Oct. 7, 2017
3:15 p.m. kickoff
Nine locations (see map below)

Items needed
Bottled water
Non-perishable, nutritional food including canned items and can openers
Baby diapers
Baby food
Baby formula
Baby wipes
Cleaning supplies
Cleaning gloves, buckets, mops, brooms, etc.
Dishes and eating utensils
New towels and washrags
New bedding (sheets, blankets and mattress covers of all sizes)
Dog and cat food

SHOW YOUR STRIPES

By Amanda Taylor, Alumni Association

The University of Utah’s annual Homecoming celebration began Saturday, Sept. 30, with the Legacy of Lowell Community Service Day and culminates Sunday, Oct. 8, with the end of Parent & Family Weekend following the previous day’s football showdown with Pac-12 peer Stanford University.

The Homecoming 2017 slogan “Show Your Stripes” is a convergence of an old idiom and a U tradition. The week’s theme speaks to proudly displaying your U pride. To “show your stripes” means: “To reveal what one really believes, thinks, or wants; to act in accordance with one’s real personality, character or disposition.”

Historically, the University of Utah has had a specific “Utah stripe” on its uniforms, and the 2015 throwback uniforms that featured the stripes were so popular, U Athletics decided to make it a permanent change. Since then, the U has promoted a #UUthrowback hashtag for Homecoming-related shares on social media.

Homecoming Week provides ways for students, alumni and other U fans to celebrate the U’s rich history and traditions of the past and present. Visit alumni.utah.edu/homecoming for more information and event registration.

Oct. 2 Emeritus Reunion: A get-together for those age 60-plus or who graduated 40 or more years ago.

Oct. 5 Women’s Soccer vs. Stanford: The No. 24-ranked U women’s soccer team hosts No. 2 Stanford at Ute Soccer Field. Show your support for the Utes in this Pac-12 showdown.

Oct. 6-8 Parent & Family Weekend: Families of U students are invited to spend time on campus and take part in Homecoming weekend festivities.

Oct. 6 Golf Scramble: Contribute to scholarship funds and play a round with friends!

Oct. 7 Scholarship 5K: Fun for the whole family (including a kid-friendly 1K) with food, prizes and more.

Oct. 7 Football Tailgate and Game vs. Stanford: Get some grub with fellow fans, then cheer on the Utes.

Oct. 8 Women’s Soccer vs. Cal: The No. 24-ranked U women’s soccer team hosts No. 11 Cal. Come out and give the Utes a home-field advantage against their Pac-12 rival.

Hurricane Disaster Donations

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have devastated the U.S. southern states and the University of Utah is partnering with our Alumni Association and the Red Cross to provide relief to those affected. We are asking the U community to donate items to assist with the relief efforts. Join our homecoming efforts to give to those in need.

Oct. 2-6, 2017
9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily
Rice-Eccles Stadium
Southwest entrance

Oct. 7, 2017
3:15 p.m. kickoff
Nine locations (see map below)

Items needed
Bottled water
Non-perishable, nutritional food including canned items and can openers
Baby diapers
Baby food
Baby formula
Baby wipes
Cleaning supplies
Cleaning gloves, buckets, mops, brooms, etc.
Dishes and eating utensils
New towels and washrags
New bedding (sheets, blankets and mattress covers of all sizes)
Dog and cat food

Campus Events

PIONEER GARDEN VOLUNTEER SESSIONS
Mondays | 8:30-10:30 a.m.
Pioneer Gardens
Tuesdays | 5-7 p.m.
Pioneer Gardens 
Wednesdays | 3-5 p.m.
Sill Center Garden
Fridays | 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Pioneer Garden

Join the Edible Campus Gardens for a lovely morning or evening of gardening. Projects could include harvesting, trellising, weeding, pruning, planting and learning gardening techniques. No prior gardening experience necessary.

View more information about volunteering with the Edible Campus Gardens here.


FALL FREE YOGA
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Fridays | 12:05 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50 minute yoga sessions from August 30 to December 13, 2017 on the Garden Level.
  • Wednesdays, 12:05 p.m.
  • *Fridays, 12:05 p.m.*

*Friday sessions begin Sept. 29*

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. This is a great opportunity to stretch and relax during the workday.

Please bring your own yoga mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check-out at the front desk.

Please provide feedback here.

Students from Yoga Assets will lead us through the yoga practice. Yoga Assets provides yoga teacher training in Salt Lake City. These events enable Yoga Assets students to fulfill their required volunteer hours.

Anyone associated with the University of Utah may attend.

Please note that yoga is cancelled:

  • Nov. 22 – Day before Thanksgiving
  • Nov. 23 – Day after Thanksgiving


Homecoming: Emeritus Reunion
Monday, Oct. 2, 2017 | 5:30-8 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law

The Emeritus Reunion is Monday, Oct. 2, with dinner and tour of the S.J. Quinney College of Law, plus a lecture by KUER’s Doug Fabrizio. This event is for people who attended or graduated from the University of Utah 40 or more years ago and/or who are age 60 or better.

$30 for Alumni Association members, $35 for nonmembers.


Homecoming 2017: House Decorating
Tuesday, Oct. 3, 2017 | 4 p.m.

Greek Row and other campus buildings decorate for the Homecoming theme, Show Your Stripes.

To be considered for the house decorating contest, fill out this interactive form.

 


Taco Party on the Patio
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017 | 10:30 a.m.
University Campus Store

Join your friends from the Campus Store and University Federal Credit Union for a Homecoming taco party on Wednesday, Oct. 4. from 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. The party will feature games, prizes, popcorn, drinks and free tacos — all served up on the new north entrance patio of the Campus Store. Among the many prizes will be two VIP tailgate passes, accompanied by two tickets to the big Homecoming game against Stanford on Oct. 7. Invite your friends, parents, teachers and classmates, and we’ll meet you on the patio.

*Tacos, prizes and drinks will be provided, while supplies last.


Shonda’s Ted Talk on Saying Yes
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017 | 11 a.m.-12 p.m.
SSB 350

Women, work and the will to lead. Please join us the first Wednesday of each month to gain insights and skills to help you grow professionally. Together we can make a difference. 

In partnership with the Women’s Enrollment Initiative and the Career & Professional Development Center.

 


FALL CEPD DISCUSSION GROUP
Every other Wednesday | 1-2 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library, Room 1140

Join the Center for Ecological Planning and Design (CEPD) for a bi-weekly discussion group. The CEPD is a campus-wide interdisciplinary center affiliated with the Global Change and Sustainability Center and the College of Architecture + Planning that aims to provide a hub for thinking and research on the built environment and communities. Discussions will be based around readings, videos, etc. that help us better understand the complexities of human settlements through diverse lenses provided by the sciences, social sciences, engineering, design fields, and humanities.

Topics will be chosen at the prior meeting and posted online here. All students and faculty are invited to attend. Drop by for one discussion that interests you, or attend all.

More information can be found on the CEPD website: cepd.cap.utah.edu under the activity tab.


FILM SHOWING: ‘THE NEW BLACK’
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017 | 1:30 p.m.

Marriott Library, Room 1150

Free pizza and drinks.

“The New Black” is a documentary that tells the story of how the African American community is grappling with the gay rights issue in light of the recent gay marriage movement and the fight over civil rights. The film documents activists, families and clergy on both sides of the campaign to legalize gay marriage. Viewer discretion is advised.

More info here.


Homecoming 2017: Songfest
Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017 | 6:30 p.m.

Ray Olpin Student Union ballroom

The energy on campus for Homecoming 2017 heats up with the annual Greek Songfest presentation of song-and-dance routines.

Call 801-581-8061 for more information.


2017 Homecoming Golf Scramble
Friday, Oct. 6, 2017 | 8:30 a.m. warmup; 9 a.m. shotgun start

Bonneville Golf Course (map)

 Register your foursome today for the annual Homecoming Golf Scramble at Bonneville Golf Course on Friday, Oct. 6. The tournament includes closest-to-the-pin and longest-drive contests, plus prizes for the first, second and third-place teams. Lunch is included.

But more importantly, it’s a great time with other Utes and an opportunity to support the Alumni Association and its programs.

Cost: $150 per person; $600 per foursome (up to 10 Mulligans available per team).

Questions? Please call John Fackler at 801-581-3895.


PRODUCE PICKUP
Through–Friday, Oct. 6, 2017 | 1-2 p.m.
Feed U Pantry (lower level of the Union)

The Edible Campus Gardens and Feed U Pantry have partnered together to bring students fresh, organic produce for free. Vegetables and greens carefully grown by students in our garden locations will be shared until the supply runs out. Stop by our table at the Feed U Pantry (located in the Union basement) on Friday from 1-2 p.m. to choose some fresh produce and meet your farmer. UCard required, reusable bag preferred.


HOMECOMING SCHOLARSHIP 5K AND KIDS 1K
Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017 | 8:30 a.m.

In front of Pioneer Theater

Join us for the annual Homecoming Scholarship 5K (U5K) and check off one of your WellU options.

Sign up by Oct. 4 online or sign up the day of the race. 

This race is a great start to Homecoming Saturday and there will be lots of food and prizes. Hope to see you there.

Register here.


UNIVERSITY OF UTAH HEALTH FARMERS MARKET
Through Monday, Oct. 9, 2017 | 12-6 p.m.
Browning Plaza – East of the School of Medicine

The Office of Wellness and Integrative Health is presenting a weekly Farmers Market on Mondays, 12-6 p.m. in Browning Plaza located east of the School of Medicine starting Sept. 11-Oct. 9.  

Seasonal fruits, vegetables and other healthy goods available from Tagge’s Famous Fruit and Veggie Farms.


THE INDIAN ART MARKET
Saturday, Oct. 14-Sunday, OCt. 15, 2017 |10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah
Celebrate native arts and culture at the Natural History Museum of Utah. 
The Indian Art Market is an annual juried art show at NHMU. It’s a great place to find and purchase amazing art from regional native artists.

 

 

 

 


Gem Series: Small Business & Entrepreneurship
Oct. 16, 2017 | 12-1 p.m.
Union Den
The second GEM Series event is on Small Business and Entrepreneurship. The Women’s Enrollment Initiative is pleased to announce that Kylee Howell of Friar Tuck Barber Shop will be the guest speaker. Howell has recently teamed up with Dove and Shonda Rhimes for their “Real Beauty” campaign. Join to learn more about Howell’s journey as a small business owner. 
 

THE 2017 TANNER LECTURE ON HUMAN VALUES
Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 | 7 p.m.

Libby Gardner Concert Hall

 A Conversation: Michael Chabon & Zadie Smith

Award-winning novelists Michael Chabon (“The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Klay”) and Zadie Smith (“White Teeth”) will participate in an unscripted, on-stage dialogue as part of the Tanner Lectures on Human Values, Thursday, Oct. 19 at 7 p.m. in Libby Gardner Hall. They will interview each other about the cultural significance of the arts and the humanities, the value of engaging with contemporary literature and the impact of current events on their writing.


HAUNTED NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: VIKING GHOST SHIP
Friday, Oct. 20, 2017 | 6-9 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah
Step inside the hull of a haunted Viking ghost ship during NHMU’s Haunted Night at the Museum.
 
Meet Vikings in the flesh, gobble down ghoulish goodies, listen to riveting Viking tales, explore the museum, and earn a prize in our spell-binding scavenger hunt.
 
Click here for more information.

Faculty Forum ‘Falling for Technology’
Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017 | 12-4 p.m.
Faculty Center and Marriott Library’s Gould Auditorium

Join Teaching & Learning Technologies and our campus partners for TLT’s Faculty Forum “Falling for Technology” event on Wednesday, Oct. 25 from 12-4 p.m. This event is free for faculty and staff and reservation is now open.

Presentations by university faculty about innovative classroom and course technology ranging from hybrid teaching and approaches, developing your own badging system and unique Canvas applications. Discovery booths featuring the latest technology and services Teaching & Learning Technologies, Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence and the Marriott Library has to offer faculty and staff. 

Agenda and RSVP information can be found on our website here.


SAM RICH LECTURE SERIES
Wednesday, Nov. 15 and Thursday, Nov. 16, 2017
Various locations

The Hinckley Institute of Politics is thrilled to bring Bob Woodward, a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist with The Washington Post, to campus as the featured guest for the 2017 Sam Rich Lecture Series. 

No one knows the American presidency as well as Woodward, the Post’s veteran reporter-historian. In his first year at the newspaper, Woodward teamed with colleague Carl Bernstein to break the Watergate scandal, which culminated in the resignation of then President Richard Nixon. He has covered every president since. Woodward has written 18 bestselling books chronicling the personalities and politics at the nation’s highest level.

Events scheduled for the series are:

  • Pizza & Politics Forum: On the Media, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 12 p.m., Room 11, Bldg. 73.
  • Screening of “All the President’s Men,” a critically acclaimed film based on Woodward and Bernstein’s book about the Watergate scandal, Wednesday, Nov. 15, 6 p.m., Fort Douglas Post Theater, 245 S. Fort Douglas Blvd.
  • Sam Rich Lecture: Thursday, Nov. 16, 7:30 p.m., Kingsbury Hall. Tickets are $5 for students and $10 for community members and go on sale Sept. 12 at 10 a.m.

GROUP SWIM LESSONS
Through–Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017
Eccles Student Life Center

Need to learn to swim or just want to increase your proficiency?  Join us for some group swim lessons.  The full schedule can be found at campusrec.utah.edu.

Need some specific attention to your swim style?  Check out our private lessons where you can learn one-on-one with our amazing instructors.


VIKINGS: BEYOND THE LEGEND
Through Monday, Jan. 1, 2018
Natural History Museum of Utah

What if the blood-thirsty plunderers you once thought you knew, were really just misunderstood explorers, farmers and traders?

Come explore Vikings to discover the truth about the Vikings age and dispel long-held stereotypes about its people, traditions and influence. Find yourself captivated by more than 400 authentic artifacts- some never before seen outside Scandinavia — including jewelry, funeral urns, weapons, game pieces, clothing and even a piece of 1,000-year-old Viking bread.

When you visit Vikings at Natural History Museum of Utah you will:

  • Imagine a Viking voyage as you marvel a full-scale replica of a Viking ship
  • Play a digital version of a popular Viking strategy game that pre-dates chess
  • Test the balance between the blade and handle of a replica Viking sword
  • Excavate a spectacular Viking burial boat, layer by layer, on an interactive touch table

Click here for more information and go here for hours and admission prices.


GRAND ROUNDS: RESEARCH REPRODUCIBILITY
Through Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Join us for a year of programming around research reproducibility. From September until June we will be holding weekly discussions, an immersive workshop and conference.

Follow the hashtag #MakeResearchTrue on Twitter.

For more information, go here.

DON’T DELAY, APPLY TODAY

By Hilerie Harris, marketing and communications coordinator, University Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid

The 2018-19 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is now available on fafsa.gov. The Internal Revenue Service Data Retrieval Tool (IRS DRT) has returned with additional security and privacy protections. The IRS DRT transfers federal tax information from the IRS to the FAFSA. 

Completing the FAFSA is the first step in determining what financial support you may be eligible to receive. It doesn’t take long, and financial aid counselors are available to walk you through the process. To be considered for the maximum amount of aid, complete the FAFSA  at fafsa.gov and any incomplete checklist items on your financial aid file in Campus Information Services (CIS) by the Feb. 1, 2018, Financial Aid Priority Application Date.

Students that meet the priority date will be considered for all need-based aid programs, including need based scholarships, grants, work-study and loans. Students that do not meet the Feb. 1 date can still complete the FAFSA and be considered for the Federal Pell Grant and loans.

For more information, read the Q&A with the University Office of Scholarships and Financial Aid or contact them at the following:

Student Services Building, Room 105
Office hours:

  • Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
  • Tuesday: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

financialaid.utah.edu
financialaid@sa.utah.edu
801-581-6211