What makes U great

Dear students, faculty and staff:

Welcome to campus! I hope your first week was intellectually invigorating and that you had a chance to make new connections and renew old friendships.

I encourage you to take a moment to watch a short welcome video that features our new Carolyn and Kem Gardner Building (known affectionately by those of us who have been on campus for a few years as “the new OSH”). This wonderful new student-focused facility is scheduled to open in fall 2018 and is reflective of the energy and excitement around the university’s very bright future.

And, while we can boast about our world-class buildings and beautiful campus, there is no doubt what makes the university great – all of you. I am glad you’re here and wish you the best for a successful year.

President David W. Pershing

What makes U great

Dear students, faculty and staff:

Welcome to campus! I hope your first week was intellectually invigorating and that you had a chance to make new connections and renew old friendships.

I encourage you to take a moment to watch a short welcome video that features our new Carolyn and Kem Gardner Building (known affectionately by those of us who have been on campus for a few years as “the new OSH”). This wonderful new student-focused facility is scheduled to open in fall 2018 and is reflective of the energy and excitement around the university’s very bright future.

And, while we can boast about our world-class buildings and beautiful campus, there is no doubt what makes the university great – all of you. I am glad you’re here and wish you the best for a successful year.

President David W. Pershing

YOUR VOICE MOVES US FORWARD

By the Office for Equity and Diversity

Sabrina Abdalla is a University of Utah alum and a poet/spoken word activist. Her start with poetry began in her sophomore year of high school where she had to write a poem for an assignment. Her teacher praised her writing and storytelling abilities. Fast forward to her senior year, she had to write another poem and had to perform in front of her class. Abdalla’s poem left her teacher and classmates astonished by how moving her words and storytelling were.  From then on, she realized the power of words and continued writing poems more regularly.

Sabrina Abdalla is a University of Utah alum and a poet/spoken word activist.

Abdalla has been performing locally throughout her college career and has previously presented her work during the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration week. Knowing her powerful storytelling abilities, the Office for Equity and Diversity (OED) asked her to write a poem for the Your Voice Moves Us Forward campaign, which became the poem “We Matter.” The Your Voice Moves Us Forward campaign was developed to increase awareness about progress of the 13 initiatives the U issued in response to a campus dialogue on racial climate held in November 2015.

“My inspiration for the poem was rooted in the idea that many people assume that ‘you matter’ is a phrase that simply reassures us. Although it is, it is not confined to just empathy. It is realizing that we all take a part of creating change, and being impartial to issues makes us a part of the issue. I wrote this to show that, indeed we matter,” said Abdalla. “But how are you (the privileged) going to help? How are you going to utilize your resources to ensure change takes place?”

The Your Voice Moves Us Forward campaign has become a platform for continuous discussions around race and inequality on campus and in our communities. “This poem isn’t to be used as a representation of what the University thinks is diversity, rather to be seen as a chance to stand up for the marginalized communities. This poem is not the solution to racial climate, this represents the ongoing dialogue to come,” states Abdalla.

In addressing racial tensions and inequality, Abdalla hopes that in the effort of moving forward, the university takes an “educational approach such as engaging in educational conversations, panel discussions, and creating events with an end goal in mind.”

Abdalla graduated from the University of Utah this past spring semester in biology. She is currently living in New York pursuing a biology teaching career to high school students in underserved communities. Abdalla credits her passion for teaching high school students to outreach programs from the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute and the Village Program at the University of Utah; both programs encouraging students to embrace themselves fully and pursuing higher education.  While in New York, she plans to perform her poems and do more spoken word to get her name out. In the future, she would like to complete a book compiling all her poetry.

The Office for Equity and Diversity invites the University of Utah campus community to voice their ideas, stay connected and be part of the Your Voice Moves Us Forward campaign.

To learn more, visit diversity.utah.edu/13-responses.

We Matter

I know I matter

It’s only right I do

The only privilege I proudly hold

It’s my education that inspires me to break out the mold

 

I am wind that disperses seeds

I am in your laws rooted deep

I, like cracks in concrete floors, still provide you stability

Like light waves, I sometimes am invisible

But can never be destroyed

 

I matter

I matter

We matter

 

When times get rough we pass the torch

And when we speak our voices are hard to ignore

Like collective work to engage communities, we strive

Resilient like our youth, we flourish

 

We matter

It isn’t something we need to remind ourselves

It’s something we need to remind you

— Sabrina Abdalla

PRESIDENTIAL SEARCH UPDATE

The University of Utah Presidential Search Committee will host three public meetings to obtain input from members of the University of Utah community and the general public on the presidential search. Public input from these meetings will help the committee shape a position announcement, the primary advertisement for the position used in recruiting candidates.

After the position announcement is finalized, the presidential search committee will go to work recruiting candidates, screening applications and conducting interviews with a number of potential finalists. The next public announcement from the committee will be when it recommends finalists to the Board of Regents, which is expected to take place in Spring 2018.

To learn more about the search process, review a draft of the position announcement, and provide feedback on the position announcement to the search committee, visit the new presidential search page at presidentsearch.utah.edu.

The University of Utah Presidential Search Committee is co-chaired by Utah State Board of Regents member Harris Simmons and University of Utah Board of Trustees chair H. David Burton. The committee is comprised of key constituent groups of the University of Utah, including regents, university trustees, faculty, staff, students, alumni and community members.

University of Utah President David Pershing announced on May 1, 2017, that he will return to a faculty position at the conclusion of a presidential search. He will remain as president until his successor is appointed by the board of regents.

The Utah System of Higher Education (USHE) is governed by the Board of Regents and is comprised of Utah’s eight public colleges and universities. The CEO of USHE is the Commissioner of Higher Education. For more information, visit higheredutah.org.

10 PEOPLE YOU NEED TO KNOW

Whether you are new to campus or preparing to graduate next spring, here are 10 people you should get to know on the U’s campus.

1. Campus safety officer

Ryan Speers is a sergeant with the University of Utah Department of Public Safety. He always wanted a career where he could help people, and when he started working with campus security as a first-year student at the U, he realized police work might be for him. While in school earning a degree in sociology, he completed training to become a police officer, and he’s still on campus 13 years later.

In his time with the Department of Public Safety at the U, he has served as a patrol officer, a detective, sergeant supervising the night patrol and, this year, he’ll oversee the Police Community Outreach Program and Campus Security Division. The program aims to promote campus safety by engaging with the community, attending events, giving presentations about safety and more.

Some of the most popular events are the annual Coffee with Cops on the Library Plaza (Sept. 19, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.) and the Lock It or Lose It program, designed to help keep students’ bikes secure on campus (Sept. 14., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on the Tanner Plaza). Other services offered by the department include a safety escort program that is available 24/7; help to those who have locked their keys in their car, need a jump start or who have run out of gas; and a Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) program that focuses on education and self-defense.

The Department of Public Safety at the U includes both a campus and hospital security division, as well as a fully functional police department. To contact dispatch, call 801-585-COPS (2677) or 911 in an emergency. Sergeant Speers is available to answer questions or schedule safety presentations at 801-585-1194 or ryan.speers@dps.utah.edu.

2. Student success advocate

Jon Bernal is a Student Success Advocate here at the U. If you’re looking to get plugged in to different resources, opportunities and programs on campus, he and the other Student Success Advocates are a great first step.

Jon and his colleagues focus their efforts on assisting students with their success, helping them reach their goals in and out of the classroom.

“Our office is unique because we can go to the student, opposed to the student having to come to us,” Jon said. “We are mobile and can set up meetings with students anywhere on campus; like a grass roots way of connecting with individuals.”

With a bit of information spanning the entire campus, they can connect students with different resources: Study and test-taking tips, goal setting, scholarships, time management, tutors, food and nutrition, health care, child care, etc.

Getting to know students’ interests, backgrounds and support systems, allow Student Success Advocates to focus their advice.

“One student I met with for about 15 minutes. In that short meeting, she said she needed a scholarship. I stayed in touch with her via email and would send her scholarships. She ended up getting a full-ride from one I sent her,” said Jon. “That one, short meeting is all it took to get her on my list to send specific information.”

While their focus is helping students find resources, they can also lend a listening ear.

“Sometimes students just need someone to vent to. Whether it’s about their roommate, significant other, societal issues or parents/guardians, we can be a good sounding board to help them get something off their chest,” said Jon. “Depending on what it is, we can refer them to where they need to go or maybe it doesn’t need to go anywhere and they just need someone to listen.”

Read about the U’s Student Success Advocates at studentsuccess.utah.edu and what they can offer you or give their office a call at 801-587-8556.

3. Counselor at University Counseling Center

At some point in your college years, odds are the demands of studying, socializing and figuring out who you are and what you want to do in life will feel overwhelming.

One study by the National Alliance on Mental Illness estimated 73 percent of college students experience a mental health crisis of some form during their academic careers. In addition, 75 percent of all chronic mental health conditions begin by the age of 24.

That’s why it’s good to know Susan Chamberlain and the rest of the team at the University Counseling Center.

“At this time in people’s lives they are exploring a lot of things related to identity, values and beliefs, figuring out who they are and what they want and that is work I love to do with people,” said Susan, a licensed staff psychologist and the center’s outreach coordinator. “Our goal is to create a space where students feel they are not being judged and can work through whatever issue they are having with someone who can be objective.”

Some of the most common reasons people visit the Counseling Center are anxiety, depression, stress, relationship issues (both romantic and family of origin) and loneliness, Susan said.

A lot of people come to college expecting to find an instant social network but “for a lot of us, it is harder than we thought it would be,” she said. “It is very human to feel insecure, to feel not good enough, to feel alone.”

Mental health is integral to wellness and can impact a students’ ability to succeed in college, but many students don’t seek help because they think they can handle it themselves or that their problems aren’t bad enough or aren’t as bad as those of other people.

“The reality is everybody needs help sometimes,” Susan said.

The Counseling Center is one of three places on campus that students can get confidential counseling services, which means that, with some legal exceptions, whatever students share won’t be disclosed to anyone — university administrators, parents, partners, etc. The Women’s Resource Center and Victim Advocates also provide confidential counseling.

The center offers individual, couples and group counseling; grief and spiritual identity support groups; mindfulness workshops; crisis counseling; and psychiatric services. Some services are free, while others have a minimal charge. No one is denied service for financial reasons.

“I find this work deeply meaningful and I know the other counselors feel the same way,” Susan said. “We want students to get the mental health help they need so they can succeed in school and in life.”

4. ASUU president

Meet Zach Berger, this year’s ASUU president. Whether you’re a new or returning student, you should get to know Zach and what he and ASUU can do for you.

From on-campus child care, tutoring and legal services, to concerts, speaking engagements, movie nights and campus traditions, ASUU can help make college life easier and more enjoyable for students.

“I love ASUU because there’s a really good network of friends you can hang out with, but more importantly, you can represent the student voice to administrators and make genuine impactful change,” Zach said. “For example, back in 1999 ASUU students got together and started advocating for a new recreation center. This eventually became a reality when the Eccles Student Life Center opened in 2015. Successive ASUU presidents, student groups and administrations worked on this project and it is a big draw to our campus.”

Through Zach and other ASUU efforts, students can be actively involved in administrative decisions.

“I’m part of the presidential search committee that’s looking for candidates to replace President Pershing,” Zach said. “While this search is confidential, I want to get student input. Whenever there is something big happening at the U, I want to get as much student input as possible so we can be accurately representing the interest of all students at the university.”

Students looking to contact Zach can email him at zberger@asuu.utah.edu. To find out the latest with ASUU, follow them on Instagram at ASUUEvents.

5. MUSS president

Steven Havlik is your 2018 president of the Mighty Utah Student Section — MUSS for short. Voted in by his fellow committee members (there are 26 of them) it’s Steven’s honor to lead the MUSS at athletic events.

“First and foremost, we’re the student section on campus. We’re there to support all University of Utah athletics teams. But we’re also a community where students can come to get to know each other and get a sense of family here on campus.”

Six thousand members strong, during football games, the MUSS leads the stadium in the third down jump. “When we are on defense we make a three with our hands and jump and make as much noise as we can to throw the other team off,” Steven explained. “The MUSS section is loud and fun and we like it that way.”

The MUSS is free to join, with the exception of football, which requires a registration process and a $50 fee. All other athletic events — men’s and women’s basketball, women’s soccer, gymnastics, volleyball, baseball and others — are free with your UCard and open to join.

Steven and his committee members regularly post to the MUSS social channels so check them out on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. They might also email you asking to join, but don’t wait that long. Visit their page and sign up.

6. Research Librarian

Lorelei Rutledge, assistant librarian at the J. Willard Marriott Library, provides research help to students, faculty and staff, teaches classes about how to use the library and creates online tools that people can use to find information about their areas of interest. She can help you find resources for papers, presentations and research.

Lorelei and library faculty can make your life so much easier. If you have questions about how to find something, they can help you get the material you need. Librarians can help with patent searching, literature reviews, systematic reviews, data management plans for grants and much more. They can also teach you how to use programs such as EndNote, which can help you manage the materials you cite in your bibliography more effectively.

Librarians can connect you to the tools you need to meet your academic goals, including research support and scholarly materials. At the library, you have free access to computers, software and other technology, such as 3-D printers, scanners and an audio/video recording studio. They library also provides additional support to students through a statistics TA who can help you use statistical software.

7. Office of Undergraduate Research

For any student interested in research, Stephanie Shiver is one of the people you must know on campus. As academic advising coordinator at the Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR,) she helps students find and get involved in student-faculty collaborative research and creative works in all disciplines on the U campus.

“Lots of people think of research as beakers and lab coats, but we work with students in every field — art history, creative writing, philosophy, biology, entertainment arts & engineering — literally anything that you can study on campus, we can work with students,” Stephanie said. “And we want to fund students who are doing that work.”

Stephanie and the OUR team give undergraduates access to the information they need to get involved in research. They help students figure out which topic interests them, how to get involved in research related to that topic, and then how to write that proposal successfully to receive funding.

From freshman to seniors, every undergraduate is eligible to take advantage of OUR’s opportunities.

“Students don’t have to be prepared in any way to meet with me. At any point, they can just come in and be like, ‘I have no idea what I’m doing; the word research sounds neat. Help me,’” Stephanie said. “And it’s also never too late. If it’s your last semester, that’s fine, too. Any research experience is legitimate research experience.”

Benefits to using the Undergraduate Research Office, according to Stephanie:

  • Research allows you to develop closer relationships with faculty members.
  • We help students identify good mentors, and go through how to approach that faculty member professionally.
  • It’s useful to know if you’re in the right field, or the right major, early on in your academic career.
  • Research is extremely marketable on resumes and graduate school applications.
  • We pay you to deepen your experience in whatever field you study
  • We offer peer advising from undergraduate research leaders, who do research on campus and can offer a student perspective.

To learn more, visit our.utah.edu/about-our and reach out to Stephanie at stephanie.shiver@utah.edu.

8. Shuttle bus driver

From the hospitals down to the stadium, the U’s shuttle bus drivers will take you where you need to go.

Marlowe Wood has been driving for just over a year. He’s retired, but thought that driving a bus sounded interesting. “Driving a bus on campus?” he said. “How fun is that!”

His favorite routes are the blue, red and orange routes, which connect the Peterson Heritage Center with the Student Union. He loves getting to know students and learning where they’re from and what they’re studying. He’s shuttled new freshmen and high-level hospital administrators alike. “They’re good people to be around and good people to accommodate,” he said.

Marlowe’s top tips for riding the U shuttle bus:

  • Wave to drivers to let them know you want a ride, especially if you’re in a crowd. Drivers can pick up riders even if they’re not at an established bus stop as well, as long as it’s safe to pull over. “If they’ll give us a wave, they’re on the bus,” Marlowe said.
  • Marlowe does his best to be aware of his surroundings, including people who walk through crosswalks with their attention on their phones. Keep your eyes open and be aware of where the buses are.

Visit uofubus.com to find shuttle bus routes and schedules.

9. Spirit squad

One “person” to know is not really a person at all (well, he kind of is, but that gets complicated)—he’s a red-tailed hawk, inspired by the aerial predators that frequently soar over campus and are indigenous to the mountain west. Of course we’re talking about the University of Utah mascot, Swoop. And if you see him around, that usually means some serious fun is afoot.

In mascot years, Swoop is relatively young at 21. Yet, he is no eyas. Swoop has participated in 15 football bowl games and 12 NCAA basketball tournaments. Not to mention the hundreds of community and campus events each year that are totally unrelated to athletics. He visits elementary schools across the state, promoting good sportsmanship and the value of education; hospitals, boosting the morale of patients; and barbecues to heat up the happiness levels.

While Swoop is a free bird, he is part of the U’s “Spirit Squad,” which includes the school’s cheer and dance teams, and is led by Jamie Duncan Plott. One question everyone seems to have is how does Swoop keep up with all the U sporting events in addition to his other appearances? The answer is that he has ample assistance from a few student friends who keep him on task and energized.

You can follow Swoop on his newly-verified Twitter account, @SwoopHawk.

10. Campus Recreation Services

Originally from New Mexico, Julian has lived in Utah for the past 24 years; 19 of those spent at the University of Utah. He enjoys traveling, photography, biking, racquetball and a little shopping; you’ll notice they are mostly recreation-based. While traveling, even when abroad, Julian always makes it a point to visit a university, especially their recreation services; he said it’s interesting to see differences and similarities between institutions around the globe.

Julian started in Campus Recreation Services and Student Affairs as a student in 1998. Since then, he’s worked in various capacities from sport clubs student assistant to intramural sports manager. His current position is associate director of communications and outreach.

“I’ve always enjoyed working with the students on campus and love to see the growth from first year through graduation, and sometime through their professional school experience,” he said. “And because it’s fresh on all of our minds, the first week of school may be quite the mad house, but I never get tired of the energy and activity of a new fall semester.”

Although his current role focuses on more broad marketing and communications efforts for the department, he’s still involved with the Intramural Sports Program.

“The Intramural Sports program really is a great, well-rounded program for our students. Campus involvement, making new friends, learning valuable skills like team-work and social interaction are all part of what makes intramural sports valuable for many of our students.”

Whether it’s mainstream sports like flag football and soccer or unique events like Canoe Battleship and the annual Turkey Target Shoot, the program has something for everyone. There are even some esport competitions like FIFA ’17 and Madden NFL on the roster to encourage students from diverse demographics to visit the Eccles Student Life Center.

“Although I’m a big advocate of intramural sports, Campus Recreation Services also provides many other opportunities for our students,” Julian said. “Outdoor Adventures, group fitness classes, lap swimming, climbing and of course self-directed work-outs, are all great ways for our students to get involved and increase student success and retention.”

If you haven’t been to the Student Life Center, or if it’s been a while, stop by and take a tour of the amazing facility and learn about the Campus Rec programs

On Sept. 6-7, there will be a faculty and staff open house with free fitness classes, climbing clinics, free swag and discounted memberships. Just bring your UCard for free access.

RETURN OF RED & WHITE FRIDAYS

By Shelby Bourne, Marketing Manager, Auxiliary Business Development and Amy McIff, Communications Manager, Auxiliary Services

Spirit and tradition are at the heart of the college experience, and donning your colors is among the best ways to show pride and loyalty to your school. Any day is a great day to rock your Utah red and white, but Fridays are taking an edge with a $100 payoff and a $1,000 shopping spree as your possible rewards.

Beginning Aug. 21, 2017, Utah Red Zone and America First Credit Union are kicking off Red & White Fridays for the second semester. This weekly opportunity for Utah fans near and far to show off their best Utah attire, enters you to win one of many prizes from Utah Red Zone. Students, staff, alumni and fans love to rep their Ute colors and we want to see how you Utah.

Between January and May of this year we selected a total of nine $100 gift card winners, and Madelyn Carter ultimately took home the $1,000 grand prize. You could be one of this semester’s luck winners by just following these three simple steps.

Step 1: Snap a photo of yourself, your friends, your family or even your pet wearing red and white Utah gear.

Step 2: Tag Utah Red Zone and America First Credit Union on Instagram.

Step 3: Post your photo using #RedWhiteFridays.

Snap, tag, post — it’s that simple.

Each Friday, a winner will be selected from the dedicated Utah fans who post a photo wearing red or white with the tag #RedWhiteFridays. Winners will be announced via social media, so keep your eyes on Utah Red Zone channels to see if you win. You must claim your prize within 48 hours or another winner will be selected.

Winners will receive a $100 gift card, redeemable at any Utah Red Zone location including main campus, Sandy, Sandy One, Layton and West Jordan. Gift cards may also be redeemed online at URedZone.com. Weekly winners will be automatically entered to win the Grand Prize giveaway — a $1,000 private shopping spree for Ute merchandise at the University Campus Store.

You can enter each week and are encouraged to tag friends, family members, coworkers or anyone else celebrating Red & White Fridays. Entries are unlimited but participants may only win once. Visit RedWhiteFridays.com to see each week’s winner and view the complete gallery of Red & White Friday fame. Contest rules and other details can also be found online.

University of Utah Campus Store, Utah Red Zone or America First Credit Union employees, vendors and their immediate family members are not eligible to win.

PARTY LIKE A ROCK STAR

By Marina Gomberg, associate director of communications and marketing for the College of Fine Arts

On Wednesday, Aug. 30 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m., the arts at the University of Utah are taking over the Marriott Library Plaza. We’re talking about a massive stage, live performances, interactive art, free food, free T-shirts, free swag and all the info you could ever want on the different ways to experience the arts on campus.

Before we go any further. You know about Arts Pass, right? That you can use your UCard to get free or discounted tickets to literally hundreds of arts experiences every year? Dance performances, concerts, plays, exhibitions, film screenings and more — and it even includes access to the newly reimagined and reopened Utah Museum of Fine Arts, as well as UtahPresents and Pioneer Theatre Company.

We’re thrilled to host all five academic units in the College of Fine Arts. They’ll be there to let you know what non-major classes you can take to supplement your education, how to major in the arts and what experiences they’re providing throughout the year for all U students, faculty and staff. Plus, we’ll have all three professional arts organizations (UMFA, UtahPresents and Pioneer Theatre Company) there along with our friends from ArtsForce, the Marriott Library’s Creative & Innovation Services and our presenting sponsors from the A. Ray Olpin Student Union.

We’re excited to welcome to the main stage (although not necessarily in this order):

  • The Department of Theatre’s musical theatre program will perform numbers from their season opener “Steel Pier” and the Musical Theatre Ensemble will also grace the stage for some high-energy musical goodness.
  • Artists Reconnecting Together is a student group affiliated with the U’s School of Dance that seeks to facilitate interdisciplinary collaborations between current students and alumni. They’ll perform excerpts from several works, some set to the jazz tunes of Kris Johnson, professor in the School of Music.
  • Speaking of which, the University of Utah Jazz Nonet led by Johnson is also set to perform. The tunes these cool cats (our words, not theirs) play are not to be missed!
  • School of Dance student Jalen Williams will change out of his dance gear and into some street clothes donning his stage name, Jaywill, for an incredible live rap performance.
  • The School of Dance will also present a stunning ballet performance, a modern dance performance called “Vividly Kinetic I” and an Arts Bash favorite, the modern dance improv jam.
  • The School of Music’s Infrared is a small vocal ensemble that will also be on stage belting out the best of pop a cappella.

More and more research is showing the positive impacts of the arts on education. The findings are significant, exposure to the arts is linked with better critical thinking skills, greater social tolerance, a greater likelihood of seeking out art and culture in the future and better workforce opportunities.

Maybe that’s why we’ve issued more than 100,000 Arts Pass tickets over the years.

So, come. Experience. Enjoy. And start thinking differently.

WATER POWERS

Water powers the American West. That’s abundantly evident in Utah — mountain snow fuels a billion-dollar ski industry in the winter and fills our reservoirs in the spring. Utah’s capital is named after the lake that collects Wasatch Front snowmelt at the end of its journey from the mountaintops.

To help more people become qualified to study and manage water issues, the University of Utah is offering a new graduate certificate program in hydrology and water resources. Provided a few prerequisites are met, all are invited to apply, including working professionals.

“There are relatively few of these programs for working professionals to come in and supplement their degree,” says Paul Brooks, professor in geology and geophysics. “This program provides training that will help them advance in their career. That’s a big unmet need.”

What does a hydrologist do?

Hydrologists study how water moves through the water cycle, and in a desert state like Utah, their expertise is critically important to maintaining sustainable and safe sources of water. Hydrologists study regular events such as rainfall, snowmelt, groundwater withdrawals or streamflow as well as extraordinary events such as floods and droughts to help water managers in the future.

When a strong thunderstorm dragged through Salt Lake City on July 26, it left behind flooding in the Sugar House neighborhood that impacted homes, schools, and TRAX lines. At first glance, the mechanisms of a flood seem simple. Rain falls, water rises. But there’s more to it. How does the rain interact with soils, rivers or groundwater? How fast do floodwaters rise? How fast do they fall and where does that water end up? The answers to these questions impact decisions on how to mitigate future floods while maintaining water quality downstream.

Hydrologists are also key to Utah’s ski industry. Because of ski resorts’ need for water to make snow, the resorts need to study their impacts on water quality and availability downstream.

“This program provides a solid foundation in climate, precipitation and weather, in surface hydrology, subsurface hydrology and chemistry,” Brooks says. “All of those slices together.”

How the program works

People from any educational background are invited to apply, providing they have completed prerequisites in physics and calculus. Applications are rolling, meaning they can be submitted any time between Aug. 1 and Nov. 1 for fall admission and Jan. 15 through March 15 for spring admission.

Students take a core curriculum of three classes, one of which is a seminar designed to help bridge the academic and professional water resource communities. The seminar reflects the value of bringing together current university students with working professionals in this certificate program.

“We want to mix practitioners with people who think about research and develop theory and basic understanding,” Brooks says. “That seamless integration is all too rare.”

Students then take three elective classes, no two of which can be from the same academic department. The classes include topics ranging from snow and ice to stormwater management to water law. Upon completion, students will have completed the educational requirements for a professional hydrologist certification from the American Institute of Hydrology.

“The biggest benefit in having a hydrologist certificate is knowing the tools that are available in the toolbox,” says Benjamin Rood, a water resources engineer with AECOM in Salt Lake City. “The certificate doesn’t mean you are the expert at all of the tools but you know what tools are available and how to apply them to a specific project or analysis.”

Rood says hydrology calculations are an integral part of his water resources designs, particularly rainfall runoff and snow melt modeling. Training in those skills would help a job candidate stand out in his industry. “Being trained as a hydrologist will allow a candidate to show their qualifications for a job exceed other candidates based on their certificate,” Rood says.

U’s expertise in water

The graduate certificate program builds on the wide water expertise already at the U, uniting researchers from across campus. By Brooks’ estimation, more than 200 faculty at the U have some component of expertise in water.

The multi-college program is hosted by theGlobal Change and Sustainability Center, which helps to facilitate interdisciplinary environmental research and graduate training programs. It also builds on the relationships built through the iUTAH program, an interdisciplinary partnership between Utah’s universities to study the water issues pertinent to the state. This allows students at the U, Utah State University and Brigham Young University to access expertise on all three campuses, Brooks says.

The hydrology certificate program is now accepting applications. Click here to learn more.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
HCI receives In-House Design Award from GDUSA
U prepares for Chinese coaching program
University Teaching Committee: Call for applications and nominations
New look for CIS coming Sept. 8
New English Language proficiency test


HCI RECEIVES AMERICAN IN-HOUSE DESIGN AWARD FROM GDUSA

 
Huntsman Cancer Institute’s Communication and Public Affairs team received a 2017 American In-house Design Award from Graphic Design USA for the 2017 Report to Our Community. The competition recognizes and celebrates excellence in inhouse design and the contributions made to their organizations. Selected from more than 6,000 entries, fellow recipients of the 2017 In-House Design Award include the American Heart Association, Hitachi, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Nestle USA and PepsiCo.  


U prepares for Chinese coaching program

On Sept. 18, the Office of Global Engagement at the University of Utah will welcome 70 collegiate coaches from China to participate in a training and education program for three months. Sponsored by the China Scholarship Council and the Federation University Sports China, the coaches will work with U athletics staff on techniques in men and women’s basketball and track and field. This will be the second year the U has participated in the program, which is part of the Pac-12 Globalization Initiative.

This past July, in preparation for the 2017 training program, 175 university coaches from across China gathered in Guangzhou, a historic port city in the southern part of the country, for a month-long intensive English program. Midway through the program, representatives from the U traveled to Guangzhou to meet the coaches, give presentations, discuss curriculum, tour athletic facilities and get a better understanding of what the coaches hope to get out of their experience at the U.

Read more here.


UNIVERSITY TEACHING COMMITTEE: CALL FOR APPLICATIONS AND NOMINATIONS

The University Teaching Committee encourages the efforts of faculty members, departments and colleges to improve individual teaching skills, devise effective teaching techniques and recognize and reward superior achievements in teaching. A variety of awards are now seeking applications and nominations.

To see criteria and deadlines, click here.

 


NEW LOOK FOR CIS COMING SEPT. 8

On Sept. 8, 2017, Campus Information Services (CIS), the online application used by students, faculty, and staff to access everything from paychecks to class schedules, is getting a new look.

Visually cluttered lists of links will be replaced by clickable tiles with intuitive icons. The home pages and subsequent tiles are dedicated to user roles, functional areas, and common themes. For example, in addition to the student and employee pages, the new CIS offers a “Financial Services” page with links to finance applications; a “Faculty and Research” page with links to resources for faculty, graduate students, and principal investigators; and a “University Resources” page with links to applications and services common to all campus users (e.g. Marriott Library, Campus Map or Shuttle Tracker). Users may add or remove optional link tiles on any of their pages, and can create their own custom home pages with the tiles they use most.

For questions about the new CIS, please contact the UIT Help Desk at 801-581-4000 option 1.


NEW ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY TESTS

Beginning in the admissions cycle for the spring 2018 term, Credits and Admissions has approved additional tests to be utilized by the Office of Admissions in order to prove a student’s English proficiency and meet the international student admissions requirement for undergraduate applicants. Previously, we have only accepted the TOEFL and IELTS test results to prove English proficiency. Please note that a student meeting the minimum score requirement on one of these tests is not guaranteed admission, but the test will qualify the student to meet the English proficiency requirement.

The chart below details the names of all tests that will be accepted to prove English proficiency, beginning in spring 2018, and also lists the minimum requirement that a student must meet for each test.

If you have any questions about these new standards, please contact Teri Clawson, associate director of Admissions (teri.clawson@utah.edu), or Chelsea Wells, assistant director of International Admissions (cwells@sa.utah.edu).

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Fall break intensive courses available
HCI receives In-House Design Award from GDUSA
U prepares for Chinese coaching program
University Teaching Committee: Call for applications and nominations
New look for CIS coming Sept. 8

Admissions application fees are changing
New English Language proficiency test


HCI RECEIVES AMERICAN IN-HOUSE DESIGN AWARD FROM GDUSA

 
Huntsman Cancer Institute’s Communication and Public Affairs team received a 2017 American In-house Design Award from Graphic Design USA for the 2017 Report to Our Community. The competition recognizes and celebrates excellence in inhouse design and the contributions made to their organizations. Selected from more than 6,000 entries, fellow recipients of the 2017 In-House Design Award include the American Heart Association, Hitachi, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Nestle USA and PepsiCo.  


U prepares for Chinese coaching program

On Sept. 18, the Office of Global Engagement at the University of Utah will welcome 70 collegiate coaches from China to participate in a training and education program for three months. Sponsored by the China Scholarship Council and the Federation University Sports China, the coaches will work with U athletics staff on techniques in men and women’s basketball and track and field. This will be the second year the U has participated in the program, which is part of the Pac-12 Globalization Initiative.

This past July, in preparation for the 2017 training program, 175 university coaches from across China gathered in Guangzhou, a historic port city in the southern part of the country, for a month-long intensive English program. Midway through the program, representatives from the U traveled to Guangzhou to meet the coaches, give presentations, discuss curriculum, tour athletic facilities and get a better understanding of what the coaches hope to get out of their experience at the U.

Read more here.


UNIVERSITY TEACHING COMMITTEE: CALL FOR APPLICATIONS AND NOMINATIONS

The University Teaching Committee encourages the efforts of faculty members, departments and colleges to improve individual teaching skills, devise effective teaching techniques and recognize and reward superior achievements in teaching. A variety of awards are now seeking applications and nominations.

To see criteria and deadlines, click here.

 


NEW LOOK FOR CIS COMING SEPT. 8

On Sept. 8, 2017, Campus Information Services (CIS), the online application used by students, faculty, and staff to access everything from paychecks to class schedules, is getting a new look.

Visually cluttered lists of links will be replaced by clickable tiles with intuitive icons. The home pages and subsequent tiles are dedicated to user roles, functional areas, and common themes. For example, in addition to the student and employee pages, the new CIS offers a “Financial Services” page with links to finance applications; a “Faculty and Research” page with links to resources for faculty, graduate students, and principal investigators; and a “University Resources” page with links to applications and services common to all campus users (e.g. Marriott Library, Campus Map or Shuttle Tracker). Users may add or remove optional link tiles on any of their pages, and can create their own custom home pages with the tiles they use most.

For questions about the new CIS, please contact the UIT Help Desk at 801-581-4000 option 1.


Fall break intensive courses available

Stay on track to graduate with a Fall Break Intensive Course (Oct. 9-13). Classes are offered Monday through Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m. with a one-hour lunch. Intensives are offered on campus as well as at the U’s Sandy Center location. Intensive classes will be as rigorous as a semester-long class and requires attendance at each class session. In addition to time spent in the classroom, students will be required to complete pre and post work.

Explore options at flexibleoptions.utah.edu.

Questions? Call 801-585-9963.


ADMISSIONS APPLICATION FEE CHANGING

Beginning with the fall 2018 academic year, the application fee for incoming undergraduate students is changing. All domestic undergraduates will pay $55, and all international undergraduates will pay $65. Questions can be directed to Teri Clawson, associate director of Admissions (teri.clawson@utah.edu). 


NEW ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY TESTS

Due to an increased focus on English language proficiency for international applicants, the University of Utah has recently approved the addition of a few new test options to prove English proficiency for undergraduate applicants. In addition to test results for the TOEFL or IELTS, we will now accept test results for any of the following tests:
  • TOEFL
  • IELTS
  • Cambridge
  • HKDSE
  • PTE
  • Password
  • EIKEN
  • TOEIC
  • Pearson Versant
  • GCSE/IGCSE
  • CEFR

If you are interested in applying as an international applicant, or if you know someone who is, please feel free to share this new information.

If you have any questions about these new tests, or the minimum standard required for one of these tests, please feel free to contact Teri Clawson, associate director of Admissions (teri.clawson@utah.edu), or Chelsea Wells, assistant director of International Admissions (cwells@sa.utah.edu).