LEARNING THE ROPES

By Joe Walker, challenge course coordinator, UNI Ropes

At first glance, a towering structure made of wood and cables may appear to be nothing more than an extreme jungle gym. But the structure on the east side of the University of Utah’s Neuropsychiatric Institute (UNI) is actually a world-class ropes course (Cummock, 2015). ROPES stands for: recreation, observation, problem solving, experiential education and self-esteem.

Prior to coming to the ROPES Course, groups determine their desired goals and outcomes. Facilitators then use this information to design and tailor the experience to the group. Every ROPES experience begins with establishing values of trust and respect among group members and with oneself. Additional results of the ROPES course include but are not limited to communication, team cohesion, conflict resolution, problem-solving, leadership skills and self-esteem building. Whether new or seasoned group member, everybody walks away with a unique shared experience.

The UNI ROPES Challenge Course is outcome focused and each group is sequenced to facilitate a positive experience. Whether a group member decides to climb or not, each group member can walk away thinking about what they accomplished and what their team learned. The goal is to provide a high quality, positive experience that groups and individuals will remember for years to come.

Both flexible and diverse, the ROPES course at UNI consists of 12 high elements, over 15 low elements and an unlimited number of ground initiative games and equipment to meet the unique needs of everyone. During the winter, a few of the outdoor elements are removed, but if the weather cooperates, groups are on the course year-round. In case of inclement weather, an indoor gym with a climbing wall, a climbing net and plenty of space for ground activities is available.

Special University of Utah rates are available for units, departments, residents, fraternities, sororities, classes, clubs and other student or faculty/staff groups. Community groups are also welcome.

Please contact the Challenge Course Coordinator Joe Walker at ROPES@hsc.utah.edu or 801-587-3148 for more information.

For more information, click here.

Sources:
Cummock, K., (2015). UNI’s ROPES Course Doesn’t Disappoint.

HUMANS OF THE U: JUNE & JULY

“Roughly three years ago, we received a call from the Huntsman Center folks who had found some basketball flooring in a back room. They asked, “Do you guys want it? If not, we’re going to throw it away.” We took the wood, not knowing its origin.

A couple of years later, we moved offices and didn’t have a conference room table. I was asked to build a table for us, using the basketball floor. Over the next three months, I disassembled the floor, cleaned it up, then put it back together piece by piece. Although the wood was clean, I left behind the dirt and grime between the boards and also left some nails. One of my favorite features of the table is the shadow left behind where the black lines for the key and red paint inside the key remain.

After installing the table in our office, the number one question everyone asked was, “Where did the basketball floor come from?” The rumor was that it was the same floor that NBA greats Larry Bird and Magic Johnson battled on during the 1979 Final Four Basketball game in the Special Events Center, now the Jon M. Huntsman Center. It became my goal to figure this out.

I researched the manufacturer of the floor and found one of their VPs who had started with the company almost 40 years ago. We talked about the construction of the floor, the manner of the manufacturer’s name being stamped on the back of the wood, and determined it was likely installed during the late 60s or early 70s. We were now one step closer to validating “the rumor.”

Using the red paint chips as evidence, we pulled video from the 1979 Final Four Championship and confirmed the inside of the key had been painted red. Eventually, we tracked down Aaron White, now interim director of Stadium and Arena Event Services, who confirmed it was indeed the original floor of the Special Events Center. ”

— Richard Fairchild, associate director, Auxiliary Business Development

“I grew up in a small southern town in Alabama, population of about 10,000, at the south end of the Appalachian Mountains. Growing up I was involved in a lot of different groups and organizations. In high school, I played the trombone and was the president of band, and I was active in my community always putting on parties and socials. Which, I didn’t know at the time, would serve me well in this role as director of the Student Union.

When I came to the U, I was told things like, “this is a commuter school,” “a lot of students are married with kids,” and “students don’t want a nightlife.” All of which I’ve found to be untrue. Students want an active and vibrant college campus life.

But the Union isn’t just a place that holds events. I know the Union to be the community center where people of different backgrounds get together in a variety of settings to meet new people. The Union provides the mechanism whereby students can meet and find a community to thrive in and develop their leadership skills and give back.

I’ve always appreciated that what we do in the Union accents what is happening in the academic arena. We teach other skills that you may not find in, say, physics. I think we teach life skills.”

— Whit Hollis, director of the A. Ray Olpin Student Union

“I didn’t realize where my passion for food came from originally. I’m the oldest of nine kids and with no father, I tried to help my mother. I decided to leave school. She found out and said I was going back to school or I was going to do an apprenticeship.

My mom was the passion. I was very, very lucky to work in a five-star hotel and start my apprenticeship in a kitchen at the age of 15. There was a lot of diversity; from Yugoslavia to Greece – about 30 different nationalities. To have something like that in 1966, to work in a kitchen was unheard of in Australia. I got to know their culture and their culture revolved around food.

To be exposed to this at 15 was wowsville!

Cooking is so creative and you start to build the flavors. It’s like building a house. You put the brick and mortar down and then you build and build. At the end, you’ve got something great. I love opening a fridge door or going to a market and finding a beet that looks amazing and it hits me that I have to create something special with beets. I get excited to create something new.

I’m near the end of my career, I’ve finally found a company that is dynamic, forward thinking and really looks out for its employees.

Whatever you have, give it back. If people ask me for a recipe, I just give it to them. You go online and find a recipe, but often something is missing, like oregano. That’s the difference between a gold-medal meal and you having a great meal at home.

Give back and never, ever, ever forget where you come from. Always honor and learn from the past and make sure to pass on your knowledge.”

— Chef Peter Hodgson, campus executive chef for Chartwells Dining Services, CEC, AAC

“I always wanted to be an illustrator. I had a professor, McRay Magleby, who did a lot of really great work for BYU and it seemed like the kind of design work you could do for universities was always really interesting and varied. Plus, as an illustrator I have the opportunity to do a lot of paintings and illustrations for projects here that I probably wouldn’t have working for an ad agency or design studio.

I used to paint and illustrate everything by hand. The first couple years I started working for this office, I got to do some hand-painted poster illustrations over the summer. I was able to hone a style working on real illustration projects through this office. Around 2000, I developed a graphic illustrative style of using the computer that I’ve been able to apply to a lot of projects here.

I have my hat in three rings. I’m the art director for the university. I also work as a freelance illustrator — which is where I’ve been able to apply my travel style on projects like notecards and posters during the 2002 Olympics and the ‘Welcome to Utah’ billboards. There are seven different billboard designs that have been used at entry points to the state. It is fun when you are coming back from a road trip and you see a sign that says ‘Welcome to Utah’ and you know that was the artwork you created for it. My travel style works perfectly for the GO LEARN! educational trip programs offered through Continuing Education.

And I’ve always painted fine art landscapes. I am represented by David Ericson Fine Art and Evergreen Framing Co. & Gallery Inc. in Salt Lake City and Medicine Man Gallery in Tucson.

Creating illustrations has always been the thing that excited me the most. There are lots of photos of campus settings, but there hasn’t really been a lot of artwork about campus. It is a lot of fun whenever there is an opportunity to create an illustration or painting of something that is campus related.”

— David Meikle, art director, University Marketing & Communications, BFA ‘94 and MFA ‘06

“I’m originally from South Sudan. In high school, I had a great teacher called Andrew Makur, who encouraged my interest in physics. He was an engineer. I looked up to him and said, ‘You know what? This is what I want to become.’

I was up against a lot. When I decided to do physics in high school, my parents weren’t enthusiastic about it. In a third world country, what are you going to do with a degree in physics? I knew that I had to push it all to the way to the end and get a PhD.

I did my graduate studies in theoretical particle physics in Europe, but during that time I was also traveling back and forth to Utah to visit my wife — her family was resettled here after fleeing violence in South Sudan. The University of Utah gave me a desk to work, and eventually hired me to the physics faculty.

In 2009, our community started noticing that we had high rates of refugee kids dropping out of schools. I see myself in those kids who are brought here as a refugee, maybe haven’t had schooling in the camps, and have no English. It’s such a big transition. When I moved to Europe, it was my first time leaving my country and everything was in English. We thought, ‘Let’s start addressing this.’ So, we started an after-school program to help those kids with homework, expose them to math and science, help them attend college.

I’m so passionate about this because I got a lot of help with my education. Mentors and outreach programs in Sudan linked me to my PhD and post-doc studies in Europe, and I didn’t pay a penny for my education. That was something that gave me a good feeling, and want to give back. The satisfaction you get by helping a person in need, you can’t compare to anything.”

— Tino Nyawelo, director of the Refugees Exploring the Foundations of Undergraduate Education in Science (REFUGE) program, director of diversity & recruitment at the Center for Science and Mathematics Education, and assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy

“I am a proud descendant of Greek immigrants (among others). In 1915 came the onset of the Greek-Armenian holocaust as well as World War I. My propappoús (great- grandfather) enlisted at age 17 into the ranks of the Hellenic Army, where he saved his future wife (my great-grandmother) and many of her family from the genocide of the Greek-Armenians in Turkey. By 1934, in great economic instability, he sought to provide a better life for his young family, so he decided to move his five children and his wife to the U.S. to pursue the American Dream in “The Land of Opportunity.”  

With the little money they had, the only form of transportation the family could afford was a cattle freighter. The rank and unsanitary conditions of the boat took a great toll on the family and especially on my great-grandmother, making her very ill. On the last week of their voyage, she tragically miscarried twin boys late in the pregnancy. In a bittersweet moment, they named their stillborn twins Liberty and Freedom. Freedom became my namesake; a name I carry with both pride and remembrance.

The meaning of my middle name extends past my father’s Greek ancestors into my mother’s line. This month as we celebrate July 4 and 24,  I feel especially close to two of my other great-grandfather ancestors, Jacob Pettibone and Lorenzo Snow.

On the fourth, I remember the sacrifices of Captain Pettibone who fought for freedom in the Revolutionary War and served as a member of Knowlton’s Rangers (the first U.S. organized espionage organization). He reported directly to General Washington. On the 24th, I remember the sacrifices of Lorenzo Snow, Utah Pioneer and fifth president of the LDS church, who sacrificed the life he built in Ohio to trek west in search of religious freedom.

I come from a long line of innovators, entrepreneurs and patriots. A dedication to freedom and liberty runs deep through my veins, which is why I have a passion for entrepreneurship. Being an entrepreneur gives you complete freedom – your success (or failure) rests upon your work ethic, determination, intelligence and attitude. I have grandfathers and grandmothers who carried the name of “inventor” with pride and were among the first patent filers in the U.S.

It is a liberating feeling knowing there are no limits on your potential except those you place on yourself – that’s the American Dream – that’s what brought my propappoús to America and that’s what inspired me to pursue a career in entrepreneurial consulting and venture capital.

Although I may not be called to the battlefield or to trek across the country, I feel an innate duty to help preserve the freedoms given me by the sacrifices of those before me and extend freedom to others through helping them pursue the American Dream of entrepreneurship.”

— Luke Freedom Hansen, U student majoring in Honors finance and entrepreneurship with a minor in leadership studies.

“Despite a decently successful life, I found myself in my early 30s without much happening. My young family and my natural anxiety kept me close to home and safe. One morning I woke up and faced the truth: I was bored. That’s when I noticed opportunity coming and going and realized I was hiding from adventure because I was afraid. So, in 2010, I decided I would start a year of saying “yes” to everything, no matter how scared I was.

What a year that became! I helped found a local community garden, learned to use a drill, gave a speech and landed in the local paper (twice) and on the TV news.

My biggest adventure took me to Haiti to work with amputee mothers from the 2010 earthquake. There was no electricity after 7 p.m., and you could not step off your porch at night because the guard dogs were trained to kill any stranger on the property. My first night I had a true panic attack and considered braving my chances with the dogs and walking through the Haitian countryside to the Port-au-Prince airport. But I stayed and on that trip I heard mothers’ stories of children lost to the earthquake, played soccer with a girl with one leg and laughed about boyfriends with young women. My heart grew.

That year I learned a lot about fear, but I learned even more about my own strength. Today, I’m still afraid but I feel like a girl on fire — I jump on every opportunity. Fear kept me safe, but it also kept me from living. I say practice being with fear — with the awkward, the unknown and the scary — embrace it as part of the fullness of life and see what happens.”

— Tamerin Smith, U staff (who has never seen the movie “Yes Man”)

“People are my life. Since I can remember, I have longed to feel like I was a part of something bigger than myself, to work and strive for equality and community as openly and truly as I can. I have always looked for roles where relationships between people and potentials for coalition building are sought after, and I am drawn to a public mindset that promotes education as the vehicle for a morally conscious environment, where people can learn self-respect, a deeper group identity, public skills and the values of cooperation and civic virtue.

My academic training is specifically grounded in diversity studies and promoting social justice through education. An important part of working with students at the English Language Institute has been to act as a cultural and academic liaison and as an area/university insider for my students’ success and growth. I deeply enjoy working with these amazingly brave young people, who are culturally, racially, linguistically and academically diverse.

Currently, my time is divided between my 1-year-old daughter, my work at the university and my music, while still finding time to get out and ride my Harley. After hours, I play in a three-piece chamber folk-rock group called Harold Henry, which is starting to gain traction. We consist of guitar, drums, cello and harmonica laden with rich vocal harmonies. Influences of our ‘whiskey-drenched’ style of music include folk, blues, soul, indie and classical. We are featured this month [July] as SLUG magazine’s ‘Localized’ band.”

— Jeremy Hansen, B.A. ’05, M.Ed. ’08, English Language Institute instructor

“I’ve been swimming for three years. I like swimming because it’s different than other sports. It’s a personal thing. You’re not relying on other people; if you mess up it’s only your fault. It’s helped me grow out of my comfort zone and meet new people. I really like going to meets because you get to hang out with your team and meet new people. It’s fun because you can beat your times and see how much you’ve improved.

I went to the U swim camp to get better at swimming. Every day we worked on different strokes and we did a lot of technique stuff so that when you’re racing then your stroke is more efficient. My friend Lily already knew some of the people from swimming. You meet them at the big meets. We stayed in the dorms and made a lot of new friends with the people in the room across from us. We snuck into each other’s rooms.

It was really fun because we got to walk around the campus and learn about the U. I thought it was all really new and looked really nice. The grounds of the University were very impressive. I thought everything was super clean and very well-kept.

It was a great experience because you get to be away from home for a week and meet new people and you’re still learning about your sport and getting better. The athletes were very impressive with their work ethic and devotion to their school and sport. I’d really like to come to the U to be a part of a team like that.”

— Eden Flake, 13, attended a swim camp at the U in June 2017

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HAPPY IS HEALTHY

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

Scientists are still exploring and debating when happiness most affects health, but there is no doubt it can do so.

Edward Diener is a professor of psychology at the University of Utah.

In the most comprehensive review to date of studies on subjective well-being, a team of researchers conclude there is a connection between happiness and health in some instances — from better wound healing and immune system function to emotional resilience. The researchers say what’s needed now is more work to unravel when, how and what types of subjective well-being are most influential.

“We now have to take very seriously the finding that happy people are healthier and live longer and that chronic unhappiness can be a true health threat,” said Ed Diener, a University of Utah psychology professor and lead author. “People’s feelings of well-being join other known factors for health, such as not smoking and getting exercise.”

The review appears in the July issue of Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being. Co-authors are Sarah Pressman, John Hunter and Desi Chase of the University of California at Irvine. The studies reviewed range from large meta-analyses — one looked at 485 studies of ties between job satisfaction and subjective health — to single studies on such topics as whether there is an association between life satisfaction and longevity.

“Scores of studies show that our levels of happiness versus stress and depression can influence our cardiovascular health, our immune system strength to fight off diseases and our ability to heal from injuries,” said Diener, who has studied happiness for more than 35 years and coined the term “subjective well-being” to describe a person’s evaluation of how his or her life is going and their emotional state.

The case is strong enough for a health influence that health care practitioners should add happiness assessments to routine questions about such behaviors as exercise, diet and smoking, Diener said.

The full article is available here.

TAPPING THE MIND-BODY CONNECTION

By Jennifer Nozawa, public relations specialist, College of Social Work

Mindfulness training and hypnotic suggestion significantly reduced acute pain experienced by hospital patients, according to a new study published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

After participating in a single, 15-minute session of one of these mind-body therapies, patients reported an immediate decrease in pain levels similar to what one might expect from an opioid painkiller. This study is the first to compare the effects of mindfulness and hypnosis on acute pain in the hospital setting.

Eric Garland is the associate dean for research at the U’s College of Social Work and director of the Center on Mindfulness and Integrative Health Intervention Development.

The yearlong study’s 244 participants were patients at the University of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake City who reported experiencing unmanageable pain as the result of illness, disease or surgical procedures. Willing patients were randomly assigned to receive a brief, scripted session in one of three interventions: mindfulness, hypnotic suggestion or pain-coping education. Hospital social workers who completed basic training in each scripted method provided the interventions to patients. 

While all three types of intervention reduced patients’ anxiety and increased their feelings of relaxation, patients who participated in the hypnotic suggestion intervention experienced a 29 percent reduction in pain, and patients who participated in the mindfulness intervention experienced a 23 percent reduction in pain. By comparison, those who participated in the pain-coping intervention experienced a 9 percent reduction. Patients receiving the two mind-body therapies also reported a significant decrease in their perceived need for opioid medication.

“About a third of the study participants receiving one of the two mind-body therapies achieved close to a 30 percent reduction in pain intensity,” said Eric Garland, lead author of the study and director of the U’s Center on Mindfulness and Integrative Health Intervention Development. “This clinically significant level of pain relief is roughly equivalent to the pain relief produced by 5 milligrams of oxycodone.” 

Garland’s previous research has indicated that multiweek mindfulness training programs can be an effective way to reduce chronic pain symptoms and decrease prescription opioid misuse. This new study added a novel dimension to Garland’s work by revealing the promise of brief mind-body therapies for people suffering from acute pain.

“It was really exciting and quite amazing to see such dramatic results from a single mind-body session,” said Garland. “Given our nation’s current opioid epidemic, the implications of this study are potentially huge. These brief mind-body therapies could be cost-effectively and feasibly integrated into standard medical care as useful adjuncts to pain management.”

Garland and his interdisciplinary research team aim to continue studying mind-body therapies as non-opioid means of alleviating pain by conducting a national replication study in a sample of thousands of patients in multiple hospitals around the country.

PRIVACY: WHAT EVERYONE NEEDS TO KNOW

By Melinda Rogers, media relations manager, S.J. Quinney College of Law

There are few secrets in today’s digital world: People more and more live their lives online every day, depending on the internet for work, to pay bills, stay informed on news and to keep connected to friends and family. Few people think about the data that is traced with the digital footprint they leave behind online — and they make assumptions that their privacy won’t be compromised in the process.

But online tracks left through providing health information, using social media, accessing financial and credit information and developing personal relationships and public lives make people easy prey for identity theft, hacking and even government surveillance. What’s at stake for communities if privacy is misunderstood, misdirected or misused?

Those questions and themes are at the heart of a new book released this month by a pair of University of Utah professors. Leslie Francis authored the new book, “Privacy: What Everyone Needs to Know,” with her husband John Francis. Both are professors at the U: Leslie Francis is a Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Distinguished Alfred C. Emery Professor and also serves as director of the Center for Law and Biomedical Sciences. John Francis is a research professor in the U’s Department of Political Science.

The book isn’t the first collaboration between the couple, whose overlapping research interests include a broad spectrum of subjects such as law, philosophy, political science, regulatory policy and bioethics. The couple is also currently working on a book about public health surveillance and data use. Their latest book comes as privacy issues remain a hot topic in the news and public policy sphere.

“With respect to everything from voter records to health, to tax records of political candidates to data security, privacy is on everybody’s radar screen. It’s been something from the perspective of bioethics that I’ve been writing about for a long time,” said Leslie Francis, noting her husband has extensive interest in comparative regulatory policy, particularly policy involving the European Union, that complements her bioethics perspective on privacy issues.

“Privacy seemed a natural thing for us to collaborate on,” she said.

“In my judgment, why this book is of value is that it makes the case that while our understanding of privacy continues to evolve what remains the same is the importance we give to privacy in so many areas of our lives,” added John Francis.

The book is part of a new series released from Oxford University Press on a variety of complex topics that are authored in a reader-friendly way. Other books in the “What Everyone Needs to Know” series explore climate change, hydrofracking, cybersecurity, inequality and drones.

Leslie Francis’ research on privacy spans decades, including several publications on the topic during her tenure at the S.J. Quinney College of Law. She has written many published works about what privacy means as well as papers on issues of justice and data use. She was involved in federal policymaking when she served on the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics, where she co-chaired the group’s privacy subcommittee.

Her husband’s resume is equally impressive. John Francis’ recent publications include articles on federalism and emerging rights, on HIV and the importance of public health policies over criminalization, on obligations of states when law enforcement fails and on the protection of data in public health policy.

The authors said they hope their latest collaboration will encourage others to think about issues related to the complex issue of privacy — and explain the subject in an accessible way to the public.

“The takeaway is that privacy is complicated and frequently changing,” said Leslie Francis. “Another takeaway that is generally unique is that in the U.S. we talk about privacy as sectoral — that is — one set of rules apply to your health data and a different set apply to credit reports and still another set apply to your education records.

The book “is an effort to bring these varying privacy rules all together in one place,” Leslie Francis said.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Campus Store kiosks
Volunteer for Be Well Utah

Pepsi vending refund vouchers 
    
Customized promotional items by University Print & Mail
Free Beats headphones from UTech
Mathematician inducted into inaugural class of fellows
HCI receives 2017 summer grants from St. Baldrick’s Foundation
Faculty, staff and student leaders needed for Move-in Day
Now hiring at Campus Recreation Services
Career Services changing its name to Career and Professional Development Center


CAMPUS STORE KIOSKS

Improving parking for visitors makes another stride this year when the Campus Store pay lot will be converted to a kiosk lot. With the successes of the new parking system over the past two years, lots like the Business loop, Union, and Student Services pay lots were converted from the outdated model of pay lots.

Advances in technology and aging equipment prompted these changes to visitor parking on campus. Now, instead of taking a ticket upon entering the lot and paying when they leave, visitors pay upon arrival at automated kiosks strategically located near lot entrances and exits.  No more waiting in line to exit and no more worries about lost tickets. You can pay for a single hour or the entire day. Guests simply enter their license plate number and swipe a credit card and they are set. They can even add time to their parking session from a cell phone so there is no need to rush out to feed a meter.

Commuter Services is installing the same parking kiosk system in the Campus Store pay lot to replace the gates and the attendants. The kiosks will function as the point of contact for purchasing and validating parking for guests and visitors to campus.

There will be three main changes as a result of the new kiosk system:

  1. There will no longer be spitter tickets or pay lot attendants, rather customers will purchase their desired time through the kiosk using their license plate and credit card.
  2. Sticker validations will no longer be valid in any visitor lot. Instead, departments may purchase “coupon codes” for their visitors.
  1. The Campus Store will still provide validations for patrons. Parking fees must be paid in advance at the kiosks, a printed receipt must be taken into the store, and one hour of the parking fee will be reimbursed at the time of purchase.

Remember, kiosks work similarly to a parking meter and payment or a validation must be made to initiate a parking session, not when leaving the pay lot. Vehicles parked in a pay lot with no valid form of payment will be ticketed.

The new kiosks will be installed and operational on August 14, 2017. 

University departments that want to purchase coupon codes or trade in sticker validations should complete an order form and allow 24-48 hours for processing.

Commuter Services will have parking lot attendants on hand for the first three weeks to help answer questions and explain the new process.  Additionally, you can watch this short video explaining the process.


Volunteer for Be Well Utah

Be Well Utah 2017 is right around the corner – the week of August 19-26, 2017.

If you’ve enjoyed the event in the past and would like to get more involved, consider volunteering this year. For more information regarding volunteering, or to sign up, please contact Aleatha Leader at Aleatha.Leader@hsc.utah.edu.

The following dates and times are available for volunteer opportunities:

  • Walk Away Obesity: Hidden Valley Park, Saturday, Aug. 19 | 7:45-11 a.m.
  • Community Open House: Huntsman Cancer Institute, Thursday, Aug. 24 | 5-9 p.m.
  • Family Health Fair: Rice Eccles Stadium,
    • Set-up day: Friday, Aug. 25
      • Two volunteer shifts: 9 a.m.–12 p.m. OR 12–3 p.m.
    • Event day: Saturday, Aug. 26
      • Two volunteer shifts: 8:30 a.m.–12 p.m. OR 11:30 a.m.–3 p.m.

For more information and a complete list of activities, please visit the Be Well Utah website.


Pepsi vending refund vouchers

Did one of the new vending machines eat your dollar? Don’t fret! You can recover your money and get that drink or food item you were hoping for by stopping by a Pepsi refund location and obtaining a credit voucher.

Pepsi has established three customer service refund locations on campus and equipped them with refund vouchers that can be used just like cash in Pepsi and hello Goodness vending machines. Those refund locations are:

  • The Union Building’s Service Desk at 200 S Central Campus Drive; 801-581-5888.
  • The Student Affairs Office, Rm 206 at 201 Presidents Circle; 801-581-7793.
  • The University Hospital Food Court at 50 North Medical Drive; 801-581-2121.

Simply provide your UID, explain your issue, where it took place and a voucher will be given to you. Refunds may only be used in Pepsi or hello Goodness vending machines. To report a machine that is malfunctioning or has a credit card reader that has gone offline, please call the support number listed on the machine.


CUSTOMIZED PROMOTIONAL ITEMS BY UNIVERSITY PRINT & MAIL

Employee Appreciation Day is fast approaching — have you ordered your department swag?

University Print & Mail is ready to help you design your department’s or organization’s customized promotional items, from office supplies to water bottles, totes and other fun giveaways. If you can think it, Print & Mail can create it. In addition to standard promotional fare, specialized items such as umbrellas, blankets, hats, shirts and other apparel are also available.

Some items can take six to eight weeks for production and delivery, so order now here, to ensure your items arrive in time for Employee Appreciation Day, which takes place on Thursday, Sept. 28.

University Print & Mail is your ongoing resource for customized promotional items any time of year. Contact Print & Mail for a custom quote at 801-581-3947 or email roger.king@utah.edu.


Free Beats Headphones from UTech

Get a free pair of Beats Headphones when you purchase a Mac or iPad Pro at the Campus Store’s UTech department, while supplies last. Don’t miss out on this amazing back-to-school offer, perfect for students and faculty gearing up for a busy fall season. Three different models of Beats Headphones will be available including Solo3 Wireless, Powerbeats 3 Wireless and Beats X.

Whether you’re an incoming student buying a computer for classes or a faculty member needing a tech update, this is a deal not to be missed. All products are available now in the Main Campus Store and the Campus Store Health. Stop in to get tech-ready for fall, and do it in style with Beats.

One pair of Beats per transaction or customer.


Mathematician inducted into inaugural class of fellows

University of Utah mathematician Frederick Adler was inducted into the Society for Mathematical Biology’s inaugural class of fellows at the recent society meeting held on the U campus. Adler served as the president of the society from 2013 to 2015 and was inducted as a society fellow along with 16 other past society presidents and two editors of the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology. Mathematical biology is the application of mathematical modeling to the study of biological processes.

See the full list of inductees here.


HCI RECEIVES 2017 SUMMER GRANTS FROM ST. BALDRICK’S FOUNDATION

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is among 56 institutions around the United States to receive 2017 summer grants from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation to support children’s cancer research.

Two HCI grants were awarded: to Kevin Jones, MD, and Fiorella Iglesias, MD, pediatric oncologists and HCI researchers. Their grants total $279,000, which will help support their studying the immune system and how it possibly drives cancer to spread to different parts of the body in synovial sarcoma, a soft tissue cancer that particularly targets adolescents and young adults.

St. Baldrick’s Foundation, based in California, is the largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants. They have funded more than $250 million in childhood research grants since 2005.


FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT LEADERS NEEDED FOR MOVE-IN DAY


In one month, on Aug. 17, more than 3,000 students will be moving into the residence halls. It’s an exciting time where we get to welcome students to the spaces they will call home. To make that day as positive and seamless as possible, we’re asking for your help.

We are looking for faculty, staff and student leaders to serve on UCrew, our group of volunteers who help students move into their new rooms. This is your chance to connect with incoming students, share your opportunities and resources, and give back to the university community.

Here are the details on move-in:

  • Date: Aug. 17, 2017
  • UCrew shifts: 8 a.m.-12 p.m. and 12-4 p.m.
  • Moving ability: You will be helping lift and move students’ items. On the sign-up form, please indicate your moving capacity.
  • Training session: Please attend one session to get a more detailed overview of the day and expectations. We are offering training on Tuesday, Aug. 1 at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 2 at 4 p.m., Monday, Aug. 14 at 10 a.m. and Tuesday, Aug. 15 at 4 p.m.

Signup is easy ­— just head to our move-in website and scroll to the bottom of the page. In exchange for volunteering, you’ll get a free T-shirt, a meal on move-in day and the chance to have an impact on a multitude of students.

Please sign up and spread the word. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Valery Pozo.


NOW HIRING AT CAMPUS RECREATION SERVICES

Campus Recreation Services is hiring for student positions in membership services. Join our Crimson Crew and work in a dynamic, fun and fast-paced environment.

All positions are on campus, have flexible hours and are eligible for scholarships after two semesters. All training, including educational (resume building, etc.) workshops are paid.

For recruitment schedules and application process, check out campusrec.utah.edu/employment.


UNIVERSITY OF UTAH CAREER SERVICES CHANGING ITS NAME TO THE CAREER AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER

University of Utah Career Services is changing its name to better reflect its mission to prepare students for their future careers and foster career readiness through early engagement with the center. It will be called the Career and Professional Development Center. The center will still provide the same helpful career coaching resources to students, and all of the essential functions it has always provided will remain the same.
  • General career coaching for students to reflect on their strengths, interests, skills and experiences
  • Exploration of career options and internships
  • Assisting students in their career planning process
  • Providing events to connect with employers and alumni

Find out more at careers.utah.edu.

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Campus Store kiosks
Volunteer for Be Well Utah

Pepsi vending refund vouchers
Free Beats headphones from UTech
Mathematician inducted into inaugural class of fellows
HCI receives 2017 summer grants from St. Baldrick’s Foundation
Faculty, staff and student leaders needed for Move-in Day
Now hiring at Campus Recreation Services
Career Services changing its name to Career and Professional Development Center


CAMPUS STORE KIOSKS

Improving parking for visitors makes another stride this year when the Campus Store pay lot will be converted to a kiosk lot. With the successes of the new parking system over the past two years, lots like the Business loop, Union, and Student Services pay lots were converted from the outdated model of pay lots.

Advances in technology and aging equipment prompted these changes to visitor parking on campus. Now, instead of taking a ticket upon entering the lot and paying when they leave, visitors pay upon arrival at automated kiosks strategically located near lot entrances and exits.  No more waiting in line to exit and no more worries about lost tickets. You can pay for a single hour or the entire day. Guests simply enter their license plate number and swipe a credit card and they are set. They can even add time to their parking session from a cell phone so there is no need to rush out to feed a meter.

Commuter Services is installing the same parking kiosk system in the Campus Store pay lot to replace the gates and the attendants. The kiosks will function as the point of contact for purchasing and validating parking for guests and visitors to campus.

There will be three main changes as a result of the new kiosk system:

  1. There will no longer be spitter tickets or pay lot attendants, rather customers will purchase their desired time through the kiosk using their license plate and credit card.
  2. Sticker validations will no longer be valid in any visitor lot. Instead, departments may purchase “coupon codes” for their visitors.
  1. The Campus Store will still provide validations for patrons. Parking fees must be paid in advance at the kiosks, a printed receipt must be taken into the store, and one hour of the parking fee will be reimbursed at the time of purchase.

Remember, kiosks work similarly to a parking meter and payment or a validation must be made to initiate a parking session, not when leaving the pay lot. Vehicles parked in a pay lot with no valid form of payment will be ticketed.

The new kiosks will be installed and operational on August 14, 2017. 

University departments that want to purchase coupon codes or trade in sticker validations should complete an order form and allow 24-48 hours for processing.

Commuter Services will have parking lot attendants on hand for the first three weeks to help answer questions and explain the new process.  Additionally, you can watch this short video explaining the process.


Volunteer for Be Well Utah

Be Well Utah 2017 is right around the corner – the week of August 19-26, 2017.

If you’ve enjoyed the event in the past and would like to get more involved, consider volunteering this year. For more information regarding volunteering, or to sign up, please contact Aleatha Leader at Aleatha.Leader@hsc.utah.edu.

The following dates and times are available for volunteer opportunities:

  • Walk Away Obesity: Hidden Valley Park, Saturday, Aug. 19 | 7:45-11 a.m.
  • Community Open House: Huntsman Cancer Institute, Thursday, Aug. 24 | 5-9 p.m.
  • Family Health Fair: Rice Eccles Stadium,
    • Set-up day: Friday, Aug. 25
      • Two volunteer shifts: 9 a.m.–12 p.m. OR 12–3 p.m.
    • Event day: Saturday, Aug. 26
      • Two volunteer shifts: 8:30 a.m.–12 p.m. OR 11:30 a.m.–3 p.m.

For more information and a complete list of activities, please visit the Be Well Utah website.


Pepsi vending refund vouchers

Did one of the new vending machines eat your dollar? Don’t fret! You can recover your money and get that drink or food item you were hoping for by stopping by a Pepsi refund location and obtaining a credit voucher.

Pepsi has established three customer service refund locations on campus and equipped them with refund vouchers that can be used just like cash in Pepsi and hello Goodness vending machines. Those refund locations are:

  • The Union Building’s Service Desk at 200 S Central Campus Drive; 801-581-5888.
  • The Student Affairs Office, Rm 206 at 201 Presidents Circle; 801-581-7793.
  • The University Hospital Food Court at 50 North Medical Drive; 801-581-2121.

Simply provide your UID, explain your issue, where it took place and a voucher will be given to you. Refunds may only be used in Pepsi or hello Goodness vending machines. To report a machine that is malfunctioning or has a credit card reader that has gone offline, please call the support number listed on the machine.


Free Beats Headphones from UTech

Get a free pair of Beats Headphones when you purchase a Mac or iPad Pro at the Campus Store’s UTech department, while supplies last. Don’t miss out on this amazing back-to-school offer, perfect for students and faculty gearing up for a busy fall season. Three different models of Beats Headphones will be available including Solo3 Wireless, Powerbeats 3 Wireless and Beats X.

Whether you’re an incoming student buying a computer for classes or a faculty member needing a tech update, this is a deal not to be missed. All products are available now in the Main Campus Store and the Campus Store Health. Stop in to get tech-ready for fall, and do it in style with Beats.

One pair of Beats per transaction or customer.


Mathematician inducted into inaugural class of fellows

University of Utah mathematician Frederick Adler was inducted into the Society for Mathematical Biology’s inaugural class of fellows at the recent society meeting held on the U campus. Adler served as the president of the society from 2013 to 2015 and was inducted as a society fellow along with 16 other past society presidents and two editors of the Bulletin of Mathematical Biology. Mathematical biology is the application of mathematical modeling to the study of biological processes.

See the full list of inductees here.


HCI RECEIVES 2017 SUMMER GRANTS FROM ST. BALDRICK’S FOUNDATION

Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah is among 56 institutions around the United States to receive 2017 summer grants from the St. Baldrick’s Foundation to support children’s cancer research.

Two HCI grants were awarded: to Kevin Jones, MD, and Fiorella Iglesias, MD, pediatric oncologists and HCI researchers. Their grants total $279,000, which will help support their studying the immune system and how it possibly drives cancer to spread to different parts of the body in synovial sarcoma, a soft tissue cancer that particularly targets adolescents and young adults.

St. Baldrick’s Foundation, based in California, is the largest private funder of childhood cancer research grants. They have funded more than $250 million in childhood research grants since 2005.


FACULTY, STAFF AND STUDENT LEADERS NEEDED FOR MOVE-IN DAY


In one month, on Aug. 17, more than 3,000 students will be moving into the residence halls. It’s an exciting time where we get to welcome students to the spaces they will call home. To make that day as positive and seamless as possible, we’re asking for your help.

We are looking for faculty, staff and student leaders to serve on UCrew, our group of volunteers who help students move into their new rooms. This is your chance to connect with incoming students, share your opportunities and resources, and give back to the university community.

Here are the details on move-in:

  • Date: Aug. 17, 2017
  • UCrew shifts: 8 a.m.-12 p.m. and 12-4 p.m.
  • Moving ability: You will be helping lift and move students’ items. On the sign-up form, please indicate your moving capacity.
  • Training session: Please attend one session to get a more detailed overview of the day and expectations. We are offering training on Tuesday, Aug. 1 at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Aug. 2 at 4 p.m., Monday, Aug. 14 at 10 a.m. and Tuesday, Aug. 15 at 4 p.m.

Signup is easy ­— just head to our move-in website and scroll to the bottom of the page. In exchange for volunteering, you’ll get a free T-shirt, a meal on move-in day and the chance to have an impact on a multitude of students.

Please sign up and spread the word. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Valery Pozo.


NOW HIRING AT CAMPUS RECREATION SERVICES

Campus Recreation Services is hiring for student positions in membership services. Join our Crimson Crew and work in a dynamic, fun and fast-paced environment.

All positions are on campus, have flexible hours and are eligible for scholarships after two semesters. All training, including educational (resume building, etc.) workshops are paid.

For recruitment schedules and application process, check out campusrec.utah.edu/employment.


UNIVERSITY OF UTAH CAREER SERVICES CHANGING ITS NAME TO THE CAREER AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CENTER

University of Utah Career Services is changing its name to better reflect its mission to prepare students for their future careers and foster career readiness through early engagement with the center. It will be called the Career and Professional Development Center. The center will still provide the same helpful career coaching resources to students, and all of the essential functions it has always provided will remain the same.
  • General career coaching for students to reflect on their strengths, interests, skills and experiences
  • Exploration of career options and internships
  • Assisting students in their career planning process
  • Providing events to connect with employers and alumni

Find out more at careers.utah.edu.

Highlighted Events

PIONEER GARDEN VOLUNTEER SESSIONS
Mondays | 8:30-10:30 a.m.
Pioneer Gardens
Tuesdays | 6-8 p.m.
Pioneer Gardens (No volunteer shitfts held on July 24)
Wednesdays | 8-10 a.m.
Sill Center Gardens

Join the Edible Campus Gardens for a lovely morning or evening of gardening. Projects may include: harvesting, trellising, weeding, pruning, planting and learning gardening techniques. No prior gardening experience necessary.

View more information about volunteering with the Edible Campus Gardens here


FREE YOGA THROUGH JULY 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50-minute yoga sessions from May-July 2017 on Mondays and Wednesdays, on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library.

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk.

Please send us feedback here.


VIKINGS: BEYOND THE LEGEND
Through Monday, Jan. 1, 2018
Natural History Museum of Utah

What if the blood-thirsty plunderers you once thought you knew, were really just misunderstood explorers, farmers and traders?

Come explore Vikings to discover the truth about the Vikings age and dispel long-held stereotypes about its people, traditions and influence. Find yourself captivated by more than 400 authentic artifacts- some never before seen outside Scandinavia — including jewelry, funeral urns, weapons, game pieces, clothing and even a piece of 1,000-year-old Viking bread.

When you visit Vikings at Natural History Museum of Utah you will:

  • Imagine a Viking voyage as you marvel a full-scale replica of a Viking ship
  • Play a digital version of a popular Viking strategy game that pre-dates chess
  • Test the balance between the blade and handle of a replica Viking sword
  • Excavate a spectacular Viking burial boat, layer by layer, on an interactive touch table

Click here for more information and go here for hours and admission prices.


 

Campus Events

PIONEER GARDEN VOLUNTEER SESSIONS
Mondays | 8:30-10:30 a.m.
Pioneer Gardens
Tuesdays | 6-8 p.m.
Pioneer Gardens (No volunteer shitfts held on July 24)
Wednesdays | 8-10 a.m.
Sill Center Gardens

Join the Edible Campus Gardens for a lovely morning or evening of gardening. Projects may include: harvesting, trellising, weeding, pruning, planting and learning gardening techniques. No prior gardening experience necessary.

View more information about volunteering with the Edible Campus Gardens here


FREE YOGA THROUGH JULY 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50-minute yoga sessions from May-July 2017 on Mondays and Wednesdays, on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library.

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk.

Please send us feedback here.


VIKINGS: BEYOND THE LEGEND
Through Monday, Jan. 1, 2018
Natural History Museum of Utah

What if the blood-thirsty plunderers you once thought you knew, were really just misunderstood explorers, farmers and traders?

Come explore Vikings to discover the truth about the Vikings age and dispel long-held stereotypes about its people, traditions and influence. Find yourself captivated by more than 400 authentic artifacts- some never before seen outside Scandinavia — including jewelry, funeral urns, weapons, game pieces, clothing and even a piece of 1,000-year-old Viking bread.

When you visit Vikings at Natural History Museum of Utah you will:

  • Imagine a Viking voyage as you marvel a full-scale replica of a Viking ship
  • Play a digital version of a popular Viking strategy game that pre-dates chess
  • Test the balance between the blade and handle of a replica Viking sword
  • Excavate a spectacular Viking burial boat, layer by layer, on an interactive touch table

Click here for more information and go here for hours and admission prices.


 

Construction & Commuter Updates

NEW:

  • Connor Road closures will no longer be put in place from July 31-Aug. 12, since construction has been delayed.

ONGOING:

  • As a result of unforeseen complications, an additional sidewalk between the Gardner construction site and to the north of BuC will be closed for work related to the high-temperature water infrastructure upgrade. The sidewalk, noted in yellow on the map below, is a major thoroughfare and will be open for the start of school. The closure will be in place from July 19-Aug. 20 so please proceed with caution in this very congested and highly traveled area.
  • One-third of the Rice-Eccles Stadium parking lot will be closed for the Tour De Utah through Aug. 8.
  • Parts of Fort Douglas Blvd. will be under construction throughout the summer for repaving. The construction will start at the north end of Fort Douglas Blvd. and continue south to building 676, Fort Douglas Residential Living.
    • Officer’s Circle will be closed in the next couple of weeks.
  • From mid-August to mid-October, a gas line replacement along the east bench of the medical campus will impact parking lots 66, 67 and 75. See map below.
  • Through Sept. 17, there will be no UTA or campus shuttle bus service to the entrance of University Hospital. UTA routes will end on Wasatch Drive, near the softball field, and riders can transfer to campus shuttles, which will drop off on the northwest corner of the helipad terrace. Click here for maps of the detoured routes. If you have any questions regarding detours or information regarding campus shuttles, contact Commuter Services at 801-581-4189. See maps below:
  • Construction will make travel in the Foothill area challenging this summer. UDOT continues repairing bridges in the Foothill Drive and Parleys Canyon area along I-80 and I-215. The construction work on these bridge decks and substructures requires lane closures and detours. Read about closures and see maps here. You can use UDOT’s Traffic website or download the mobile Traffic App to be an informed motorist and stay current on road conditions, incidents and construction updates.
  • UDOT will perform resurfacing maintenance work on I-80 from 1300 East to Foothill Drive. Construction has begun and will last through September. This project will prolong the life of the roadway and provide a smoother ride for drivers.
    • All lanes will be open during daytime hours Monday through Friday. During overnight hours and on weekends, lane closures will be in place and drivers should expect moderate delays. Motorists should also expect occasional ramp closures at night during construction.
  • The majority of the visitor pay lot between the Student Services Building and Browning Building is closed. The sidewalk on the north side of Tanner Plaza, near the Student Service Building is closed. The northeast corner entrance to the Student Services Building is also closed and will remain closed through mid-September as the high temperature infrastructure moves through the area.
  • The U was able to add increased UTA service between Summit County and Salt Lake City on the PC-SLC Connect.
    Find the schedule here.
  • The entrances and exits on the south side of the West Parking Garage will be closed as the access roads to the garage are widened; all traffic in and out of the garage will have to access the building at the top floor entryway near the hospital loading dock at the north end of 1900 East. Effective mid-May, the top entrance of the garage (at the north end of 1900 East) will be closed for approximately two years and the south entrances will reopen.
  • Installation of IT lines are underway around the Health Sciences Campus and will be blocking off certain parking areas throughout the next few months. No more than 25 parking stalls will be closed at a time.
  • The area surrounding northwest side of the Social & Behavioral Science building will be fenced off for a seismic upgrade. This area will reopen June 2018.
  • For the next phase of the Ambulatory Care Center project construction, ramp widening on the west terrace began on April 3.
    Vehicular access to the west terrace from the two south ramps will remain open until this time.
  • Areas in lot 39 will be closed off for the installation of poles for new camera systems.
  • The Marriott Library HVAC control is being upgraded. A portion of the parking lot will be fenced off for contractor to park their trucks and store materials. This project is continuing into the summer 2017.
  • The construction of the Executive Education Building between Sorenson Arts & Education and the Business Building (SFEBB) is underway. Construction to complete in the fall of 2018.
  • Work is being done on the chiller line between the Fletcher and South physics buildings. ADA access will be provided but there will be no access to the construction area. This is expected to be completed in spring 2017.
  • Work is underway on the high temperature water infrastructure upgrade that will be a disruptive, though rather contained, effort currently in progress on the north side of BUC and the Business School. Sidewalks will be intermittently closed, at all times at least one sidewalk, often multiple sidewalks, will remain open for pedestrian access.
  • Construction of the Carolyn and Kem Gardner Building is underway at the former site of OSH. This project will continue through the summer of 2018.
  • The Alumni House is under renovation. Expect noise and dust disturbance impacting some pedestrian paths. Expected to be complete in winter 2017.
  • Renovations at the Crocker Science Center on President’s Circle continue to progress. The center will be open in late fall of 2017.

See the construction impact map below.