HUMANS OF THE U: LET FREEDOM RING

“I am a proud descendant of Greek immigrants (among others). In 1915 came the onset of the Greek-Armenian holocaust as well as World War I. My propappoús (great- grandfather) enlisted at age 17 into the ranks of the Hellenic Army, where he saved his future wife (my great-grandmother) and many of her family from the genocide of the Greek-Armenians in Turkey. By 1934, in great economic instability, he sought to provide a better life for his young family, so he decided to move his five children and his wife to the U.S. to pursue the American Dream in “The Land of Opportunity.”  

With the little money they had, the only form of transportation the family could afford was a cattle freighter. The rank and unsanitary conditions of the boat took a great toll on the family and especially on my great-grandmother, making her very ill. On the last week of their voyage, she tragically miscarried twin boys late in the pregnancy. In a bittersweet moment, they named their stillborn twins Liberty and Freedom. Freedom became my namesake; a name I carry with both pride and remembrance.

The meaning of my middle name extends past my father’s Greek ancestors into my mother’s line. This month as we celebrate July 4 and 24,  I feel especially close to two of my other great-grandfather ancestors, Jacob Pettibone and Lorenzo Snow.

On the fourth, I remember the sacrifices of Captain Pettibone who fought for freedom in the Revolutionary War and served as a member of Knowlton’s Rangers (the first U.S. organized espionage organization). He reported directly to General Washington. On the 24th, I remember the sacrifices of Lorenzo Snow, Utah Pioneer and fifth president of the LDS church, who sacrificed the life he built in Ohio to trek west in search of religious freedom.

I come from a long line of innovators, entrepreneurs and patriots. A dedication to freedom and liberty runs deep through my veins, which is why I have a passion for entrepreneurship. Being an entrepreneur gives you complete freedom – your success (or failure) rests upon your work ethic, determination, intelligence and attitude. I have grandfathers and grandmothers who carried the name of “inventor” with pride and were among the first patent filers in the U.S.

It is a liberating feeling knowing there are no limits on your potential except those you place on yourself – that’s the American Dream – that’s what brought my propappoús to America and that’s what inspired me to pursue a career in entrepreneurial consulting and venture capital.

Although I may not be called to the battlefield or to trek across the country, I feel an innate duty to help preserve the freedoms given me by the sacrifices of those before me and extend freedom to others through helping them pursue the American Dream of entrepreneurship.”

—Luke Freedom Hansen, U student majoring in Honors finance and entrepreneurship with a minor in leadership studies.

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FLIP-FLOP POLITICS

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

Hillary Clinton did it. So did George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, Barack Obama and Jason Chaffetz.

Tamar A. Kreps

They flip-flopped.

In fact, many politicians are unable to navigate public careers without a flip-flop or two — and a new study led by Tamar A. Kreps, an assistant professor in the Department of Management, showed those changes of mind can be risky.

Kreps and her co-authors reported in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology that audiences believe moral commitments made by politicians should not be broken and view leaders who later change their minds as hypocritical, ineffective and not worthy of support.

“Leaders who take a moral stance look inspiring and persuasive at first, but we found in study after study that they end up looking worse if they change their minds,” Kreps said.

Kreps, working with colleagues at the University of British Columbia and Stanford University, looked at views of politicians who changed their minds after taking either a moral or pragmatic stand on an issue. The issues used in the scenarios were the death penalty and same-sex marriage.

The researchers theorized there were three possible ways audiences would respond to moral mind changers: they would view a leader as hypocritical; they would view a leader as making a courageous evolution in his or her thinking; or they would adopt a hypocritical or courageous evolution view of the leader depending on whether his or her new stance matched their own opinion on the issue.

A leader who takes a moral stance may appear more authentic, inspiring and as making decisions rooted in firm convictions.

But the researchers found audiences expect those leaders to stick to their opinions.

“People not only expect that others are likely to stick to their moral views, they see this commitment as a moral obligation and turn against those who break it,” they concluded.

Kreps found that audiences viewed a moral mind changer as a hypocrite even when they endorsed the new stance taken by the leader.

The team found a “glimmer of hope” for moral mind changers, however. Leaders were less likely to be viewed negatively when they tied their flip-flop to a personally transformative experience or, to a less extent, external circumstances beyond their control.

“These findings offer the only hope we were able to uncover that people might sometimes be willing to view a moral mind changer in a positive light,” the authors said.

But Kreps said the bottom line is this: Leaders who don’t want to risk a public backlash should avoid taking moral stands that aren’t based on enduring conviction.

SLC AFTER DARK

By Andrew Thompson Landerghini

If you followed the playoff run by the Utah Jazz this year, you probably heard members of the Golden State Warriors lamenting about Salt Lake City’s lack of nightlife. While locals know that there’s plenty to do in SLC after dark, the claim compelled the Jazz to respond with this T-shirt. And it piqued our curiosity on the favorite downtown haunts of our students, staff and faculty.

Some of the establishments that stood out were Kilby Court (great live music and all ages), Keys on Main (a piano bar on, you guessed it, Main Street), Bar X (a swanky martini joint owned by Ty Burrell from “Modern Family”), The Rest (a subterranean speakeasy with artisan cocktails and delectable dining underneath Bodega on Main) and Nostalgia Coffee.

While all great recommendations, we also wanted some input from Lassonde startup The Society, which is a rewards program card for Salt Lake City bars, restaurants and concert venues. Here are some of their top spots.     

Urban Lounge

This live music venue is probably one of the best spots in Salt Lake to grab a brew and enjoy some tunes. Most nights of the week they have great touring acts or local groups performing for quality prices, which makes this an awesome place to rock out with friends. The intimate atmosphere could only be rivaled by Metro Music Hall — a slightly more party-ready and event-diverse location, also owned by the same rad dudes, Lance Saunders and Will Sartain.

Our perk:
Two-for-one ticket deal for all shows. Valid on the day of the show. Show must not be sold out.

Address: 241 S. 500 East, Salt Lake City

Bambara

This sit-down restaurant pairs an extremely chic vibe with equally delicious food. And what pairs better with those two things than a high-end bar? We couldn’t tell you. If the beauty of arched windows, brass accents and marble aren’t enough to sate you, just wait until your meal arrives. The price is worth the bliss.

A post shared by BambaraSLC (@bambaraslc) on

Our perk:
Saturdays and Sundays, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. get a free French pressed Publik Coffee or a fresh pressed juice.
Monday-Sunday, 5:30-10 p.m. get a free blue cheese chip appetizer.

Address: 202 S. Main St., Salt Lake City

Twist

Have you ever been in a repurposed, 19th century boiler room? If you answered no, then your priorities may be a little twisted. Not only is this a cool place to meet up with friends, but it also has a fun social atmosphere, great food and delectable drinks. With over 40 local and craft brews to choose from, you’re sure to find something to complement your flavor-packed meal.

A post shared by Twist (@twistslc) on

Our perk:
Anytime: 25-percent off dine-in food. One item per Society Card.

Address: 32 E. Exchange Pl., Salt Lake City

Piper Down

Didn’t anyone ever tell you not to judge a book by its cover? Expand your horizons by giving this classic Irish pub a chance. They have a huge outdoor patio, live music, don’t-miss events and more. It is well worth the trip and very likely your new St. Paddy’s Day tradition.

A post shared by Mike Smith (@mike_uncharted) on

Our perk:
Two-for-one food menu items before 7 p.m.
Free cover before 10 p.m.

Address: 1492 S. State St., Salt Lake City

Downstairs

Leave your prospecting tools at home, there’s already a hidden gem of a nightclub waiting for you in Park City. The live artists they host almost every weekend are sure to entertain a group of two or 20 so be sure to bring your friends. As if the cool, speakeasy vibe weren’t enough on its own.

Our perk:
Free entry every night of operation (excluding special events). 

Address: 625 Main St., Park City

SKY SLC

Whoever says Salt Lake has no nightlife has clearly never visited this revolutionary venue. The three floors of this elite club could easily rival any other renowned entertainment facility around. Indeed, they often see some of the best DJs from around the world. 

A post shared by SKY SLC (@skyslc) on

Our perk:
$5 off Therapy Thursday door ticket
Free admission every Saturday with a +2 before 11 p.m.

Address: 149 W. Pierpont Ave., Salt Lake City

Brewvies

You’ve got your popcorn in one hand, adult beverage in the other and the latest film to grace the big screen playing in front of you. There’s a reason this is a well-known local classic. With the events and films going on and stellar food and drink options, you’ll have plenty of reasons to keep coming back.

Our perk:
Free small popcorn

Address: 677 S. 200 West, Salt Lake City

The Society

By now, you’ve definitely added a place or two to your list of must-dos. Why not join The Society and make sure you have access to exclusive perks you can’t get anywhere else? Your card practically pays for itself quicker than you’d think and since it’s a one-time fee for a lifetime of inclusion with an ever-increasing number of locations. After all, the best part of the day is the night.

Our perk:
VIP access to great nightlife locations

Address: Always expanding

Location excerpts written by Morgan Parent

SPIKING IT

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

By the time Jake Gibb graduated with a business degree from the University of Utah in 2002, he knew exactly where he was headed: the beach.

Gibb began playing volleyball when he was 17 and, he says, he wasn’t very good back then. But Gibb fell in love with the sport and kept playing — right on through his student days at the U, where he played indoor club volleyball.

“I knew I wanted to move to California and pursue a beach volleyball career when I graduated,” Gibb said in an email.

And, so he did.

Today, Gibb is a three-time Olympian (2008, 2012 and 2016). In July will represent the U.S. at the FIVB Beach Volleyball World Championships in Austria, playing with Taylor Crabb. It’s the biggest event in the sport outside of the Olympics.

“I keep telling myself and others that I’m not 41-years old and that I’m just a young buck out here, but no one seems to believe me,” said Gibb, a Bountiful, Utah, native.

Gibb’s climb to the pinnacle of his sport has come with challenges. He is a two-time cancer survivor, having fought melanoma in 2004 and testicular cancer in 2011 — just as Gibb was preparing for both the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London and the birth of his first child with wife Jane.

Gibb was able to compete and finished fifth at the Olympics that year, a feat that earned him FIVB’s Most Inspirational Athlete in both 2013 and 2014.

More recently, Gibb and Crabb have two fifth-place finishes on the 2017 FIVB World Tour. He and Crabb are among eight U.S. pairs (men’s and women’s) who made the cut for the 2017 World Championships.

“What keeps me going is my love for the sport of beach volley,” Gibb said. “If I had a regular office job I would be out on the weekends playing with friends. I love playing and I love the life it provides for me and my family.”

Oh, and did we mention Gibb’s middle name? It’s his mother’s maiden name, one he shares with all his 10 brothers and sisters: Spiker.

ENRICHING EDUCATION

By Jana Cunningham, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

The University of Utah announced that Elaine Clark, professor of educational psychology at the U, has accepted the appointment as the new dean of the College of Education. For a seamless transition, Clark will begin July 1 as the current dean, María Fránquiz, moves to her new position as deputy chief academic officer for Faculty Development and Innovation. 

“I am honored to have this unique opportunity to work with the outstanding faculty and staff in the college,” said Clark. “The College of Education is a significant contributor to ensuring that all children with varied backgrounds, needs and abilities have access to a high-quality education, including one that provides effective academic, social, emotional and mental health supports.”

Clark has been a member of the faculty in the Department of Educational Psychology since 1983. She served as the director of the school psychology program for 21 years and department chair for six. She has dedicated her career to the development of applied research and the preparation of school psychologists to provide effective services to individuals who have significant social, emotional and learning challenges, in particular, those with an autism spectrum disorder.

“I am delighted that Elaine will serve as the next dean of the College of Education,” said Ruth Watkins, senior vice president of Academic Affairs. “She is a longtime member of the U community and has served in numerous leadership roles. She is well-known nationally for her research and service in professional organizations.”

Clark has served as the president of the Society for the Study of School Psychology and is a member of the American Psychological Association Board of Professional Affairs. She has also served in offices within the state, including the Utah Association of School Psychologists and Utah Psychological Association.

The College of Education creates a learning environment that fosters discovery and dissemination of knowledge to promote learning, equitable access and enhanced- learning outcomes for all students. The college prepares practitioners and scholars through cutting-edge research and practice, by leading innovation and collaboration and by promoting a culture of theory and data-informed inquiry and action.

“The college continues to build strong relationships across campus and within our community. In their roles as teachers, researchers and individuals committed to community engagement, our faculty shape the future of education in the state and beyond to improve student success and lifelong possibilities,” added Clark.

MERGING RESEARCH AND DESIGN

By Ashley Babbitt, public relations specialist, College of Architecture + Planning

The University of Utah recently approved creation of the Center for Ecological Planning and Design. The new center merges the provisional Ecological Planning Center and the Integrated Technology in Architecture Center — both in the College of Architecture + Planning — in a new partnership with the Global Change and Sustainability Center. The Center for Ecological Planning and Design is positioned to bridge the gaps between research and the design and planning fields, both within CA+P and across campus, with a focus on the built environment and the human communities that inhabit it.

Sarah Hinners, director for the provisional Ecological Planning Center, answers questions about the new center:

Tell us about the significance of the work of the new research center?

The built environment refers to buildings, roads, parking lots, etc. — all that stuff that humans build for ourselves to make life easier, safer and more comfortable or convenient. Cities are dominated by the built environment and it is becoming more and more the dominant habitat of humanity worldwide. But our environments are not always a healthy and life-enhancing and can be vulnerable to environmental changes and disasters. The built environment affects people’s lives and in turn, human communities shape and influence the built environment.

At the center, we’re focused on bringing together the people who study the built environment, such as scientists, social scientists and engineers, with the people who plan, design and build it. We have most of these disciplines represented here on campus, but they are widely dispersed among multiple colleges and dozens of departments. We’re interested in bringing these experts from across campus and outside of academia together to generate ideas and knowledge, ultimately to build better places for humans.

How will this center allow the college to collaborate in new ways?

There are challenges to interdisciplinary work. People in different disciplines and in different colleges on campus don’t necessarily speak the same language and it can be difficult to work with others without the feeling of stepping on toes or coming into competition with one another. There is a tremendous opportunity, one that is so often missed, to build collaborations and this potentially has the power to transform the way cities and communities take shape. The center is intended to build bridges between departments in the College of Architecture + Planning and across campus. By working under the umbrella of the Global Change and Sustainability Center, we offer a place to collaborate on disciplinary neutral ground — a place where people interested in resilient communities and built environments can meet in the middle and do great things together.

What types of research will emerge from this center?

We anticipate building a research portfolio of collaborative solutions for cities, including sustainable and resilient infrastructure systems, highly functional and beautiful urban ecosystems, strong inclusive communities and equitable access to a high quality of life in cities.

 Who are the key participants and collaborators of the center?

The center started out as the Ecological Planning Center, established as a provisional center in 2012 and funded with a donation from the Swaner family. As we grew, we came to understand just how interdisciplinary this work needed to be. A bunch of pieces fell into place within the past year that really opened important doors for us. One was an opportunity to join forces with the Integrated Technology in Architecture Center that has been doing research on the ecology of construction practices and building materials for a long time. The second was a desire, with the Global Change and Sustainability Center, to coalesce some of its expertise into a smaller number of topical themes, one of them being the built environment and communities.

In addition to myself, the new center includes Diane Pataki, associate professor of biology, and Ryan Smith, director of Integrated Technology in Architecture Center. The steering committee also includes members from city and metropolitan planning, parks recreation and tourism, mechanical engineering, biology, geology and geophysics, environment and sustainability studies, the Environmental Dispute Resolution Program in the Law School and a member of the local planning professional community.

How can a person get involved?

We’d love to engage with anyone who is interested in these topics through collaborative interdisciplinary research, education, events and symposia. One opportunity is to get involved with our work associated with Red Butte Creek here on campus. We have been working on a plan for revitalization of the U’s portion of the creek and the intent is to create a hub for implementation of the plan as well as the development of research and education programs associated with Red Butte Creek.

Our website: cepd.utah.edu
Contact Sarah Hinners: sarah.hinners@utah.edu

VULTURE CONSERVATION

HawkWatch International and the University of Utah are partnering on two studies in the Horn of Africa: A new effort studying raptor migration over the Bab-el-Mandeb Strait in Djibouti and a continuation of vulture extinction studies based in Ethiopia.

PHOTO CREDIT: Evan Buechley

Long-Legged Buzzard.

Evan Buechley, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Utah, will manage the two projects in conjunction with HawkWatch International scientists and University of Utah biology professor Çağan Şekercioğlu.

“Vultures are the world’s most threatened group of birds and yet they provide critical ecological functions and benefit humans by consuming carrion and reducing disease,” said Buechley.  “There is growing evidence around the world that when vultures decline, populations of disease vectors like feral dogs, rats and flies increase, leading to more human disease burden, particularly in developing countries.  Ethiopia has the most diverse and abundant vulture community in the world — with seven species, all of which are threatened with extinction — and is a critically important location to target conservation actions and study how vulture declines impact ecosystems and human health.”

Buechley is surveying vultures throughout Ethiopia to estimate populations and distributions, track movements and key foraging and breeding sites and to evaluate the human repercussions of vulture declines.  More information can be found at hawkwatch.org/vultures.

PHOTO CREDIT: Evan Buechley

Tawny Eagles in the Horn of Africa.

One of the critical sites to target conservation for vultures and other soaring birds is the Bab-el-Mandeb Strait, which is located between Yemen on the Arabian Peninsula and Djibouti in the Horn of Africa. An estimated 1.5 million diurnal raptors of at least 31 species, including eight species at risk of extinction, migrate each year between Eurasia and Africa.  The geographic bottleneck is considered one of the largest, if not the largest, concentration of migrating birds in the world.  However, very limited and no full-season data exist for this site to fully illustrate the ecological importance of the area.

In order to better understand the diversity and magnitude of bird migrations over the Bab-el-Mandeb Strait in Africa, the group will conduct the first full-season bird migration count fall 2017. 

HawkWatch International coordinates the largest raptor migration network in North America and helped launch the Veracruz, Mexico River of Raptors Project in 1991, which is now regarded as a world-renowned raptor monitoring, education and conservation initiative.  More information can be found at hawkwatch.org/migration.

“HawkWatch International has over 30 years of experience conducting raptor migration research and we are excited to be the first group to fully study the fall raptor flight at Bab-el-Mandeb and see how it compares to other major flyways around the globe,” said Dave Oleyar, HawkWatch International senior scientist. 

Publications on these projects are anticipated for 2018-2019.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
New CourseLeaf Section Scheduler replaces paper class scheduling process
State of the Utes: June 2017
Hunter Dimick, Hannah Flippen win Pac-12 medal
Apple watch now available at The Campus Store

Reimagine Education Awards: Open for applications
Attention! Help need with study


NEW COURSELEAF SECTION SCHEDULER

The Office of the Registrar will be implementing CourseLeaf Section Scheduler (CLSS), a new scheduling software which will replace the previously paper-based class scheduling process. The new software will place many tools in the hands of college and department administrators, which will help in the goal of creating optimal class schedules for our students.

CLSS goes live on July 12 and the upcoming Spring 2018 Class Schedule will be created using this new technology. 

To learn more about CLSS, click here.


STATE OF THE UTES: JUNE 2017

Athletics Director Chris Hill discusses University of Utah Athletics updates every month. In June, he talked about construction projects on campus and the impacts to the existing soccer field. Watch this “State of the Utes” video to learn more about the university’s master plan for residential on-campus housing, the soccer field, where the new NCAA lacrosse team will practice and more.


HUNTER DIMICK, HANNAH FLIPPEN WIN PAC-12 MEDAL

Utah football player Hunter Dimick and softball player Hannah Flippen were announced today as recipients of the prestigious Pac-12 Tom Hansen Conference Medal. The Tom Hansen Conference Medal is awarded annually to each Pac-12’s member institution’s outstanding senior male and female student-athlete based on the exhibition of the greatest combination of performance and achievement in scholarship, athletics and leadership.

Conference medal winners have been named every year since the 1960-61 academic year. On Thursday, June 29 at 8 p.m. MT, Pac-12 Networks will feature the Tom Hansen Conference Medal winners on its year-end Sports Report, a one-hour special honoring the 24 recipients of the prestigious award.

Click here to read the full story.


APPLE WATCH NOW AVAILABLE AT THE CAMPUS STORE

The Apple Watch is now available at the main Campus Store for purchase, along with a variety of fashionable wristbands. This long anticipated popular tech gadget, the Apple Watch, is now being offered to faculty, staff and students. Now is your opportunity to snag a watch and use employee payroll deduction for added convenience.

Along with the watch, UTech is well stocked with all of the newly announced Apple products including refreshed iMacs, MacBooks and MacBook Pro models. Among our new products is the recently announced by Apple new iPad Pro Model that comes in 12.9 and 10.5-inch sizes. Be sure to stop by UTech in the Campus Store to check out these all-new products and get yourself prepped for fall semester.


REIMAGINE EDUCATION AWARDS: OPEN FOR APPLICATIONS

Education is changing. If you’re driving that change, join Reimagine Education.

Reimagine Education aims to acknowledge and reward those most successful in creating transformational educational initiatives, enhancing student learning outcomes and/or employability.

Educational innovators from all the world can select one of our 15 award categories and submit their projects for free here until the call for submissions closes on July 31, 2017.

The overall winner will receive $50,000 in funding. The Award Ceremony and Gala Dinner will take place Dec. 5, 2017, at the Reimagine Education Conference in Philadelphia.

To learn more about the application process and criteria, applicants can consult our application E-Guide.


ATTENTION! HELP NEED WITH STUDY

A postdoctoral research associate in the College of Social Work is recruiting participants for a study on ways to improve attention among students and is seeking help from faculty teaching summer classes.

If you are willing to let the lead researcher come make a five-minute presentation to your undergraduate or graduate class about the study, please contact Adam Hanley at utahattentionstudy@gmail.com.

This is a grant-funded, IRB-approved study that will involve about 90 participants. The participants will be paid up to $60 for their time, which will consist of a one-hour pre-testing session, a one-hour post-testing session and four 15-minute attention training sessions.


 

Student Life

JUMP TO:
New CourseLeaf Section Scheduler replaces paper class scheduling process
State of the Utes: June 2017
Hunter Dimick, Hannah Flippen win Pac-12 medal
Apple watch now available at The Campus Store
Attention! Help need with study


NEW COURSELEAF SECTION SCHEDULER

The Office of the Registrar will be implementing CourseLeaf Section Scheduler (CLSS), a new scheduling software which will replace the previously paper-based class scheduling process. The new software will place many tools in the hands of college and department administrators, which will help in the goal of creating optimal class schedules for our students.

CLSS goes live on July 12 and the upcoming Spring 2018 Class Schedule will be created using this new technology. 

To learn more about CLSS, click here.


STATE OF THE UTES: JUNE 2017

Athletics Director Chris Hill discusses University of Utah Athletics updates every month. In June, he talked about construction projects on campus and the impacts to the existing soccer field. Watch this “State of the Utes” video to learn more about the university’s master plan for residential on-campus housing, the soccer field, where the new NCAA lacrosse team will practice and more.


HUNTER DIMICK, HANNAH FLIPPEN WIN PAC-12 MEDAL

Utah football player Hunter Dimick and softball player Hannah Flippen were announced today as recipients of the prestigious Pac-12 Tom Hansen Conference Medal. The Tom Hansen Conference Medal is awarded annually to each Pac-12’s member institution’s outstanding senior male and female student-athlete based on the exhibition of the greatest combination of performance and achievement in scholarship, athletics and leadership.

Conference medal winners have been named every year since the 1960-61 academic year. On Thursday, June 29 at 8 p.m. MT, Pac-12 Networks will feature the Tom Hansen Conference Medal winners on its year-end Sports Report, a one-hour special honoring the 24 recipients of the prestigious award.

Click here to read the full story.


APPLE WATCH NOW AVAILABLE AT THE CAMPUS STORE

The Apple Watch is now available at the main Campus Store for purchase, along with a variety of fashionable wristbands. This long anticipated popular tech gadget, the Apple Watch, is now being offered to faculty, staff and students. Now is your opportunity to snag a watch and use employee payroll deduction for added convenience.

Along with the watch, UTech is well stocked with all of the newly announced Apple products including refreshed iMacs, MacBooks and MacBook Pro models. Among our new products is the recently announced by Apple new iPad Pro Model that comes in 12.9 and 10.5-inch sizes. Be sure to stop by UTech in the Campus Store to check out these all-new products and get yourself prepped for fall semester.


ATTENTION! HELP NEED WITH STUDY

A postdoctoral research associate in the College of Social Work is recruiting participants for a study on ways to improve attention among students and is seeking help from faculty teaching summer classes.

If you are willing to let the lead researcher come make a 5-minute presentation to your undergraduate or graduate class about the study, please contact Adam Hanley at utahattentionstudy@gmail.com.

This is a grant-funded, IRB-approved study that will involve about 90 participants. The participants will be paid up to $60 for their time, which will consist of a one-hour pre-testing session, a one-hour post-testing session and four 15-minute attention training sessions.



Highlighted Events

PIONEER GARDEN VOLUNTEER SESSIONS
Mondays | 5-7 p.m.
Pioneer Gardens
Tuesdays | 5-7 p.m.
Pioneer Gardens
Wednesdays | 8-10 a.m.
Sill Center Gardens
Fridays | 8-10 a.m.
Pioneer Gardens

Join us in the Edible Campus Gardens to plant, weed, harvest, and complete other seasonal gardening tasks. The volunteer sessions are hands-on and student-led. Volunteers who stay the length of the session bring home a small share of the day’s harvest. Learn more about volunteering here.

The Edible Campus Gardens is an organic student-powered garden on campus. We engage the campus community in ecologically sound and just food systems through garden-based experience, education and research.

To stay updated on additional volunteer times and related events sign up for our weekly newsletter here.  


FREE YOGA FROM MAY-JULY 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50-minute yoga sessions from May-July 2017 on Mondays and Wednesdays, on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library.

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk.

Please send us feedback here.


INDEPENDENCE DAY
July 4, 2017

No classes will be held today.


FREE INTRODUCTION TO MINDFULNESS SESSIONS
Wednesdays, July 5-26 | Various times
HSEB, Room 2948


Please join us in exploring and experiencing what mindfulness has to offer. The University of Utah Health Office of Wellness & Integrative Health, the Resiliency Center and the GME Wellness Program are offering a series of FREE, introductory mindfulness sessions. Classes will be led by Trinh Mai, faculty in the College of Social Work.

Dates and times:

  • Wednesday, July 5 from 12-1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, July 12 from 6-7 p.m.
  • Wednesday, July 19 from 12-1 p.m.
  • Wednesday, July 26 from 6-7 p.m. ​​​

SUMMER OPEN HOUSE AT THE THOMAS S. MONSON CENTER
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 | 2-5 p.m.
411 East South Temple


The Thomas S. Monson Center has a grand feeling unlike anywhere else on campus. This historic, meticulously restored mansion is just minutes from Downtown Salt Lake City. This gorgeous building, now owned and operated by the University of Utah, creates a picturesque backdrop for a meeting, event, reception, luncheon or a conference. The ornate, gold laced ballroom has a sweeping view of downtown and the surrounding mountains. The Carriage House and Plaza, Zion’s Bank Classroom and Miller Town Hall offer a variety of meeting space options. University of Utah department discounts are available. Alcohol can be served through a licensed caterer, and there is free on-site parking. If you’re looking for beautiful, stunning traditional architecture and timeless elegance, the Thomas. S. Monson Center is for you. Come and enjoy summer refreshments and take a tour of all the beautiful meeting spaces available for your department or next campus event.

More information can be found here.


LETTERPRESS PRINTING: TEXT AND IMAGE
Every Thursday through July 27 | 5:30-8:30 p.m.
Book Arts Studio, Level 4, Marriott Library


Get a handle on what it takes to crank out an edition of gorgeous letterpress prints. This active, eight-week class introduces the fundamentals of letterpress, from paper selection and cutting to mixing ink and printing. Guided by the instructor, participants design and produce four individual projects using a variety of relief techniques and tools including metal and wood type, zinc cuts, linoleum blocks, pressure prints, photopolymer plates and collagraphs. Space is limited to 15 participants.

Get registration, pricing and more information here.


VIKINGS: BEYOND THE LEGEND

Through Monday, Jan. 1, 2018


What if the blood-thirsty plunderers you once thought you knew, were really just misunderstood explorers, farmers and traders?

Come explore Vikings to discover the truth about the Vikings age and dispel long-held stereotypes about its people, traditions and influence. Find yourself captivated by more than 400 authentic artifacts- some never before seen outside Scandinavia — including jewelry, funeral urns, weapons, game pieces, clothing and even a piece of 1,000-year-old Viking bread.

When you visit Vikings at Natural History Museum of Utah you will:

  • Imagine a Viking voyage as you marvel a full-scale replica of a Viking ship
  • Play a digital version of a popular Viking strategy game that pre-dates chess
  • Test the balance between the blade and handle of a replica Viking sword
  • Excavate a spectacular Viking burial boat, layer by layer, on an interactive touch table

Click here for more information and go here for hours and admission prices.