DON’T FAIL. LEARN.

Tom Chi was on campus Friday, May 26, to speak to 130 international Fulbright students who participated in a four-day seminar on innovation, entrepreneurship and commercialization. Technology & Venture Commercialization hosted the students.

Chi worked for Yahoo!, Microsoft and was a co-founder of Google X, which he has referred to as the company’s “Department of Science Fiction.” While at Google, Chi created the first prototype of Google Glass and worked on self-driving cars and Project Loon — an initiative to spread internet access to rural and remote areas around the world. Today, Chi is dedicated to creating a socially and environmentally sustainable future using breakthroughs in access and capability of new technologies. One effort: Planting a half a trillion trees to offset the carbon load.

Chi is an expert in prototype-based decision-making, which was the focus of Friday’s talk. A few of the messages he shared: Find the quickest path to experience. Doing is the best kind of thinking. To maximize the rate of learning, dramatically minimize the time to try things. Don’t guess, learn. Don’t fail, learn.

After his presentation and a Q&A session with the students, Chi sat down with communications specialist Brooke Adams for an interview. Watch here.

HUMANS OF THE U: MAY

Alison: “I just graduated with three of my daughters last week. I went back to school after graduating 27 years ago with an associate degree in nursing. When my last daughter graduated from high school and I turned 50, it was time to return for a bachelor’s degree in nursing. In the middle of going to school, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I knew I couldn’t quit because I was worried I wouldn’t go back, so I did all of my classes online. I would work Monday through Friday, 7 a.m.-3 p.m., in the operating room at University Hospital, and then I would walk up to the university’s Huntsman Cancer Institute after work to get radiation treatment. To be a patient and not a nurse is a hard switch sometimes for us nurses, but I think it is always good to see the other side of things.”

Hannah: “I will always remember how hard everyone worked while we were all in school together, especially my mom. She rocked college. There were long nights and cereal for dinner at our house, but it was nice to have each other to bounce ideas around.”

Leigh Ann: “I always knew Hannah and I would graduate at the same time because that’s kind of expected when you’re a twin. It was a wonderful experience going through college together – it wasn’t just one of us stressing about midterms, finals and papers – it was all of us. I’m considering several master’s programs, but I haven’t decided on one yet. Hopefully, I decide soon because the one thing I know I want to do is keep learning.”

— Alison Elliott (Bachelor of Nursing) with three of her daughters, Leigh Ann Elliott Bauman (political science), Hannah Elliott (economics), and Halie Elliott (psychology and sociology)

“I recently returned from leading a team of seven individuals to the North Pole. The most challenging part of of the trip was day six, the day we thought we were going to reach the pole. The team was excited about the possibility of being so close to the pole that we decided to push for 16 miles that day. We encountered many pressure ridges (where ice comes together to form large frozen walls) and combined with the low light, it made travel and navigation tough. When we were two miles from the pole, we were stopped in our tracks by an open lead (open water) that was about 25 feet across. When we scouted it in both directions, there was no end in sight to the water. Time was also beginning to run against us. Throughout the entire trip, the ice that we were skiing on was slowly drifting around the arctic circle. If we couldn’t find a way across the open water, we would’ve drifted past 90 degrees north. Skiing against the drift once you’ve passed the pole is near impossible. We made camp for the night and continued to plan our travel for the next day. We knew we had to cross the open water somewhere.

The next morning, we set out to find a narrow point in the lead where the ice was frozen enough for us to cross. After a few hours of skiing, we found a suitable crossing. With the help of some climbing ropes and ice screws that we were carrying, we were able to pull floating ice blocks together to form a bridge that allowed us to cross. We were then within three miles of the pole.

Without a doubt, reaching the 90 degrees 00’00.00 north mark on our GPS indicating that we reached the pole, was the best part of the trip. There is no mark at the pole to tell you that you’ve arrived, but when we hit 90 degrees north, the team was ecstatic. We all celebrated, hugged one another and offered congratulations. It felt especially great to reach the pole after the hardships that we encountered the previous day where we thought all hopes of reaching 90 degrees north were lost.”

— Andrew Leary, Class of 2015, master’s degree, Department of Parks Recreation and Tourism

“I’m a nursing professor at the U. My grandmother completed her nursing training nearly a hundred years ago at LDS Hospital, long before nurses could earn a college degree.

Grandma Beth told me about rolling bandages and cooking for sick patients. Once a woman dying from postpartum sepsis begged her to marry her soon-to-be widowed husband. Rules were rigid in the hospital dorm where nursing trainees lived. Dating was forbidden, and secret marriages, if discovered, resulted in immediate expulsion. At the end of a nurse’s three-year, unpaid apprenticeship a ceremony marked her entry into the profession. Each nurse was given a small pin for her uniform and a heavy wool cape embroidered with the LDS Hospital insignia. I was lucky enough to inherit those treasures. After finishing her nursing training, Grandma Beth went to Columbia University for more training. She taught nursing in Idaho Falls, then worked the rest of her life in a small community clinic in Grantsville, Utah.

When I joined the faculty at the U my grandmother had already passed on. I thought about her often and wanted to memorialize her career as a nurse. My extended family came together to name a room in the College of Nursing after her: the Elizabeth Ellen Holton Clark conference room. Her picture now greets me when I meet with students and colleagues. My grandmother never had a chance to earn a college degree. But she was a fierce supporter of nursing education. I may not be a U graduate, but I’m definitely a U supporter and a proud nurse.”

— Lauren Clark, professor, College of Nursing

Continue reading

POLITICAL INSPIRATION

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University of Utah Marketing and Communications

A new endowed chair at the U will honor the late Sen. Robert F. Bennett and his exemplary commitment to public service in Utah and the country and to developing pragmatic solutions to critical national challenges.

The senator’s family, the Department of Political Science, Hinckley Institute of Politics and College of Social and Behavioral Science are joining forces to raise funds for the chair, which will focus on American politics, public service and student engagement. The goal is to raise $1 million.

The chair also will serve as a bridge between the scholarly study of American politics within the Department of Political Science and the mentorship in practical politics that students receive through the Hinckley Institute of Politics.

“Our goal in creating an endowed Chair in American Politics named after Senator Bennett is to continue his impressive legacy of service to the public and to inspire our students to participate actively in the American political process,” said Mark Button, chair of the Department of Political Science.

Bennett received a bachelor’s degree in political science from the U and while a student served as president of ASUU. Bennett met his wife Joyce here at the U.

Bennett had a successful business career before being elected to the U.S. Senate in 1992. He was the first chief executive officer for the Franklin International Institute (which became FranklinCovey). He worked as the chief congressional liaison at the U.S. Department of Transportation and as a public relations director for Summa Corp., owned by billionaire Howard Hughes.

Bennett served three terms in the Senate, holding posts on the Senate Appropriations Committee, Senate Banking Committee and as chairman of the Joint Economic Committee. Chances are you benefited from Bennett’s public service: he secured federal funds for the construction of TRAX and FrontRunner systems, among other community projects.

After leaving office, Bennett served in many capacities — including as Resident Scholar at the Hinckley Institute, where he taught courses until the final days of his life, Button said.

“Given Senator Bennett’s passion for politics and public service, we think this chair will help us honor his memory and create exciting new learning and career opportunities for students at the University of Utah,” Button said.“The Bob Bennett Chair will be awarded to a nationally recognized scholar of American political institutions and the policy process with a proven record of achievement as a scholar, teacher, and public advocate.”

For more information on the endowment, click here.

HITTING IT OUT OF THE PARK

For the first time in program history, Utah Softball hosted an NCAA College Softball World Series Regional — and it was a super success! Against the backdrop of Salt Lake City’s foothills, the Utes went 3-0, defeating Fordham University in the opener and Brigham Young University in the region’s semifinal and championship round (by scores of 3-2 and 14-0, respectively), which earned them a trip to the Super Regional series versus Washington.

Led by head coach Amy Hogue, Utah Softball was awarded to be host of the Salt Lake City Regional thanks to its stellar regular season, where the team finished with a 33-14 record and were ranked No. 13 in the nation. The remarkable season was accentuated by a series win over then-No. 1 Arizona, a sweep of No. 10 UCLA in Westwood, Calif., and wins over No. 7 LSU and No. 13 Tennessee.

Utah Softball’s ascension to the upper echelons of NCAA softball began last year with its first trip to the Super Regionals. A big factor in the success has been Hannah Flippen, who has won back-to-back Pac-12 player of year awards and is Utah’s career leader in hits and runs. Backing Hannah up are four other All-Pac-12 players — fellow first-teamer and junior pitcher Miranda Viramontes, freshman outfielder Alyssa Barrera, junior pitcher Katie Donovan and senior shortstop Anissa Urtez.

However, Utah’s season came to a halt in the Super Regional versus Washington, as the Huskies took two out of three in Seattle to advance to the next round of College Softball World Series. It was super season though in which Utah Softball made every Ute fan proud.

LEADERSHIP CHANGES

By Marina Gomberg, associate director of communications and marketing, University College of Fine Arts

University of Utah Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Ruth Watkins announced that John W. Scheib, director of the School of Music at University of Kentucky, has accepted the offer to serve as the next dean of the College of Fine Arts. Following the completion of the appointment approval process, Scheib will begin on July 1, 2017.

“We are delighted to welcome professor Scheib to this key leadership role at the U,” said Watkins. “His record of achievement as a scholar, educator, leader and champion of the arts is remarkable.”

After earning his master’s and doctorate from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in music education, Scheib began his academic career at Ball State University where he held a number of leadership positions, including director of the School of Music. For the past three years, he has served as the director of the School of Music at the University of Kentucky. In that role, Scheib has implemented several well-regarded budget and personnel initiatives. He has significant experience with capital campaigns and has developed programming aimed at improving student and faculty success, as well as enhancing access to the arts. He is recognized for his talent as a keen listener who works with his team, including community members, to build and enact vision and strategy to advance the arts.

Scheib’s research in music education is rooted in his experience as a music teacher in the Wisconsin public schools for nine years. He focuses on, among other things, the beliefs and practices of music teachers and their students and music education reform. His work has appeared in numerous journals, including the Journal of Research in Music Education and the Journal of Music Teacher Education.

“I am excited to be joining a college and university with such a strong commitment to the development of creative and innovative leaders and citizens,” said Scheib. “Our roles as artists, arts scholars and arts educators are vital as we provide key opportunities for students to develop the wide range of intelligences and skills necessary for 21st century success.”

The search for the replacement of esteemed Raymond Tymas-Jones, who served as dean for 12 years and who will remain as the U’s associate vice president for the arts, began in fall 2016. The committee, led by College of Humanities Dean Dianne Harris and School of Music associate professor Jessica Nápoles, included members of the college’s faculty, staff, students and Advisory Board, as well as members of the community and professional arts affiliates on campus.

SUSTAINABLE SANITARY PAD

By Vince Horiuchi, public relations associate, University of Utah College of Engineering

Each year, nearly 20 billion sanitary pads, tampons and applicators are dumped into North American landfills every year, and it takes centuries for them to biodegrade inside plastic bags, according to a 2016 Harvard Business School report. Additionally, it requires high amounts of fossil fuel energy to produce the plastic for these products, resulting in a large carbon footprint.

PHOTO CREDIT: Ashlea Patterson

The SHERO Pad, developed by a team of University of Utah materials science and engineering students, is a new feminine hygiene pad that is 100 percent biodegradable and made from all natural materials. It consists of four layers and can break down in as little as 45 days.

But a team of students led by University of Utah materials science and engineering assistant professor (lecturer) Jeff Bates has developed a new, 100-percent biodegradable feminine maxi pad that is made of all natural materials and is much thinner and more comfortable than other similar products.

The SHERO Pad uses a processed form of algae as its super-absorbent ingredient, which is then covered with cotton and the same material that makes up tea bags. The result is a maxi pad that is effective, comfortable to wear and can break down anywhere from 45 days to six months.

“This is novel in comparison to other biodegradable options out there for pads,” said Amber Barron, a University of Utah junior in materials science and engineering who is on the team of four students. “Most are really bulky because they don’t have a superabsorbent layer.”

The need for something like the SHERO Pad originally came from SHEVA, a nonprofit advocacy group for women and girls in Guatemala, which turned to Bates because it was looking for a sustainable solution for feminine hygiene waste. One of Bates’ area of research is in hydrogels, which are water-absorbing polymers.

“In Guatemala, there’s no public sanitation system. All the rivers are black because they are so polluted,” Bates says. “So there really is a genuine need for people in Guatemala to have biodegradable options.”

Part of Bates’ solution came one night while feeding his 5-year-old daughter.

“One day we were eating dinner with white rice, and my daughter spilled it all over the floor,” he says about that night two years ago. “The next morning, when I was cleaning it up, it was all dry and crusted. I drove to work and thought, ‘What was it about rice that does that?’”

That question of how rice hydrates and dehydrates began a two-year process of searching for the right natural materials for the feminine pad, which included testing with different leaves, such as banana leaves, and forms of cotton.

Bates, Barron and the rest of the team — which includes sophomore students, Sarai Patterson, Ashlea Patterson and Ali Dibble — ultimately developed the SHERO Pad, which is made up of four layers: An outer layer of raw cotton similar to a tea bag to repel liquid, a transfer layer of organic cotton to absorb the liquid and pull it from the outer layer, the super-absorbent layer made of agarose gel (a polymer from brown algae), and a final layer made of a corn-based material that keeps the moisture inside and prevents leakage.

While there are other similar sustainable feminine pads on the market today, they either use a hydrogel that is not 100 percent biodegradable or they use thicker layers of natural cotton that are uncomfortable to wear, Barron says. Another advantage to the SHERO Pad is that it can easily be manufactured in smaller villages using locally sourced materials and without sophisticated tools, just common presses and grinding stones, Bates says.

While the team originally developed the SHERO Pad for users in developing countries such as Guatemala, Bates and the students also will start selling the product in the U.S. for environmentally conscious women. A working prototype has been produced, and they have launched a startup company based in Bountiful, Utah. They hope to have products in Guatemala and on U.S. store shelves within a year.

EDUCATION AFTER GRADUATION

Once students complete the course successfully, they can claim a digital badge that can be shared on social media and on digital resumes.

A new non-credit certificate program offered by the University of Utah is designed to help recent graduates expand their employment options. The Degree Plus certificates, which begin in fall 2017, focus on teaching skills needed for careers in high-demand areas, including operations, content marketing, instructional design, data analysis and digital communications.
 
The certificate program was developed based on research indicating that pairing technical skills with a liberal arts background can nearly double the jobs available to graduates, as well as increase their salaries. Additionally, program developers consulted with local employers to identify skills they value in new hires.
 
“Utah’s booming software and technology sector is facing one primary headwind to its phenomenal growth rate: A limited supply of tech-ready talent,” said Bassam Salem, a Degree Plus program advisor, CEO of AtlasRTX and vice chairman of the Utah Technology Council. “The University of Utah’s Degree Plus program is a genuinely innovative approach to preparing a large number of existing and diversely-skilled college graduates with technology careers.”
 
Each Degree Plus certificate takes between seven and eight weeks to complete. Classes are taught by industry experts in the evenings, with some Saturday classes. To help participants determine if the program is a good fit for their goals, students have the option to attend the first class for free. Additionally, all Degree Plus students have access to one-on-one career coaching specific to the certificate program.

A career matchmaker quiz is available to help those interested determine which certificate best fits their interests.

“Having local professionals teach classes not only gives students a real-world perspective, but also helps them build connections in the industry,” said Andrea Miller, associate director Professional Pathways for Professional Education at the U. “We believe education is a lifelong endeavor, and these certificates are designed to be the first step in continuing to develop professionally and to maximize the value of their degree after graduation.”
 
Once students complete the course successfully, the certificate will appear on their official transcript, they will receive a University of Utah Professional Education certificate and they can claim a digital badge that can be shared on social media and on digital resumes. Digital badges are embedded with meta-data that allow employers to click for more information about the individuals’ achievement.
 
“Academic institutions are increasingly tasked to create connections between learning outcomes and workforce readiness,” said Pete Janzow, senior director of Acclaim, the digital recognition platform used by the U. “We’re pleased to partner with the University of Utah to provide students with digital badges that communicate competencies with full context and verification, while also offering learning pathways and job opportunities based on an individual’s skills.”
 
In addition to recent graduates, these certificates are also open to experienced professionals who want to add new skills to their portfolio, change career paths or for individuals looking for experience in a new area before attending grad school. More information about the certificates can be found at degreepluscertificate.com. A career matchmaker quiz is available to help those interested determine which certificate best fits their interests.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
University Campus Bicycle Shop opens
Call for participation: U research data repository pilot project
Summer intramural sports registration deadline: May 31
Poet and BYU professor selected as the 2017-18 Marlin K. Jensen Scholar and Artist in Residence
Reimagine Education Awards: Open for applications
Learning Abroad deadlines
Campus Recreation is hiring personal trainers
Support national parks by using Zimride


UNIVERSITY CAMPUS BICYCLE SHOP OPENS


The University of Utah Commuter Services Department is proud to announce the opening of the University Campus Bicycle Shop. The Campus Bicycle Shop is located next to our main offices in the Annex at 1901 E. South Campus Drive, our primary hub of operations.

This year, May, is designated as Bike Month, the official month for celebrating bicycling and promoting active transportation. Cycling is convenient, healthy and a sustainable alternative to driving to campus. It’s virtually cost-free and allows much closer access to your destination than vehicle parking lots. Cycling to the U can be a fun, practical, and productive way of making exercise a regular part of your life.

Commuter Services is kicking off its new Campus Bicycle Shop to support all cyclists throughout the year. The Campus Bicycle Shop will provide the campus community a central location for any repair needed to commute to and from the U. Located near both the South Campus TRAX station, and the Fort Douglas TRAX station, getting your bike to the shop should be easy. Services will be available from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Monday through Friday, with special requests available.

The shop will be able to offer you most of the services you can expect at other locations throughout the city, but at a convenient location should you need a repair during you time in class or at work. Stop by our main office or give us a call to schedule some TLC for your bicycle.

The University Campus Bicycle Shop will be offering the following services starting June 1 throughout the summer:

  • Flat repair
  • Cable service
  • Tune up
  • Bike assembly
  • Consultation
  • Maintenance instruction

We will consider any custom request, which may require additional time to order parts.

For other bike, related questions please check out our website here.


CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: U RESEARCH DATA REPOSITORY PILOT PROJECT

The University of Utah has created an institutional research data repository, The Hive, to help researchers fulfill funding agency and journal mandates to share data and to encourage transparent research. As part of a pilot project, we would like to work with a select number of researchers on campus to deposit data into The Hive and to learn what we can do to better meet the needs of researchers on campus. If you are interested in participating in this pilot project or would just like to learn more, please fill out this short online application before June 19, 2017. Participants will work with a librarian to describe and ingest their dataset into The Hive repository.

Datasets ingested into The Hive as part of this pilot project must be authored by a member of the University of Utah research community and must be complete, digital, less than 500 GB, and publicly available by August 2017. We are not accepting confidential or sensitive data into The Hive at this time. Please feel free to contact Rebekah Cummings at Rebekah.cummings@utah.edu or Daureen Nesdill daureen.nesdill@utah.edu if you have any additional questions.


SUMMER INTRAMURAL SPORTS REGISTRATION DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, MAY 31

Join the summer fun. Intramural Sports registration is still open and we have a few spots available for softball, soccer and sand volleyball.

Register a full team or join a team as a free agent. 

Register today at imleagues.com/utah.


Tanner Humanities Center selects poet and BYU professor as the 2017-18 Marlin K. Jensen Scholar and Artist in Residence

The Obert C. and Grace A. Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah selected Kimberly Johnson as the 2017-2018 Marlin K. Jensen Scholar and Artist in Residence fellow. Johnson, U alumnus and professor and associate chair of English at Brigham Young University,  is the recipient of numerous awards including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Utah Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Her latest book of poetry, “Uncommon Prayer,” was published in 2014. Johnson’s fellowship will consist of a semester-long residency at the Tanner Humanities Center beginning in spring 2018. She will lead a semester-length poetry course for U students and lifelong learners featuring a series of guest poets and public readings. She will also contribute to Mormon Studies curriculum planning and program development.


REIMAGINE EDUCATION AWARDS: OPEN FOR APPLICATIONS

Education is changing. If you’re driving that change, join Reimagine Education.

Reimagine Education aims to acknowledge and reward those most successful in creating transformational educational initiatives, enhancing student learning outcomes and/or employability.

Educational innovators from all the world can select one of our 15 award categories and submit their projects for free here until the call for submissions closes on July 31, 2017.

The overall winner will receive $50,000 in funding. The Award Ceremony and Gala Dinner will take place Dec. 5, 2017, at the Reimagine Education Conference in Philadelphia.

To learn more about the application process and criteria, applicants can consult our application E-Guide.


LEARNING ABROAD DEADLINE: FALL, FALL BREAK AND ACADEMIC YEAR GLOBAL CAMPUS, AFFILIATE AND FACULTY-LED PROGRAM APPLICATIONS

Students applying for a Learning Abroad Global campus, affiliate and faculty-led programs should complete their Learning Abroad Applications by 11:59 MST on June 1 for the following terms:
  • Fall 
  • Fall break 
  • Academic year 

Please note that affiliate application deadlines may vary.

The deadline for Learning Abroad exchange programs for fall and academic year programs is March 1.

Check out all of the possibilities and deadlines by using the Learning Abroad program search.

Deadlines that fall on a Saturday or Sunday will be extended to the following Monday. 


CAMPUS RECREATION IS HIRING PERSONAL TRAINERS

Join our Crimson Crew team as a Personal Trainer and help others reach their goals. You must be a current U student, be PT certified and have some prior experience.

To apply, contact Cairistiona Flatley, cflatley@crs.utah.edu.


SUPPORT NATIONAL PARKS BY USING ZIMRIDE


The web-based ridesharing service Zimride, which is available at the University of Utah, will donate $1 to the National Park Foundation for every new member or new ride posted in April up to $10,000.

In addition, Enterprise Holdings Inc., which owns Zimride, will match Zimride’s contributions dollar for dollar.

Sign up and post a ride here.


Student Life

JUMP TO:
University Campus Bicycle Shop opens
Call for participation: U research data repository pilot project
Summer intramural sports registration deadline: May 31
Poet and BYU professor selected as the 2017-18 Marlin K. Jensen Scholar and Artist in Residence
Learning Abroad deadlines
Campus Recreation is hiring personal trainers
Support national parks by using Zimride


UNIVERSITY CAMPUS BICYCLE SHOP OPENS


The University of Utah Commuter Services Department is proud to announce the opening of the University Campus Bicycle Shop. The Campus Bicycle Shop is located next to our main offices in the Annex at 1901 E. South Campus Drive, our primary hub of operations.

This year, May, is designated as Bike Month, the official month for celebrating bicycling and promoting active transportation. Cycling is convenient, healthy and a sustainable alternative to driving to campus. It’s virtually cost-free and allows much closer access to your destination than vehicle parking lots. Cycling to the U can be a fun, practical, and productive way of making exercise a regular part of your life.

Commuter Services is kicking off its new Campus Bicycle Shop to support all cyclists throughout the year. The Campus Bicycle Shop will provide the campus community a central location for any repair needed to commute to and from the U. Located near both the South Campus TRAX station, and the Fort Douglas TRAX station, getting your bike to the shop should be easy. Services will be available from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Monday through Friday, with special requests available.

The shop will be able to offer you most of the services you can expect at other locations throughout the city, but at a convenient location should you need a repair during you time in class or at work. Stop by our main office or give us a call to schedule some TLC for your bicycle.

The University Campus Bicycle Shop will be offering the following services starting June 1 throughout the summer:

  • Flat repair
  • Cable service
  • Tune up
  • Bike assembly
  • Consultation
  • Maintenance instruction

We will consider any custom request, which may require additional time to order parts.

For other bike, related questions please check out our website here.


CALL FOR PARTICIPATION: U RESEARCH DATA REPOSITORY PILOT PROJECT

The University of Utah has created an institutional research data repository, The Hive, to help researchers fulfill funding agency and journal mandates to share data and to encourage transparent research. As part of a pilot project, we would like to work with a select number of researchers on campus to deposit data into The Hive and to learn what we can do to better meet the needs of researchers on campus. If you are interested in participating in this pilot project or would just like to learn more, please fill out this short online application before June 19, 2017. Participants will work with a librarian to describe and ingest their dataset into The Hive repository.

Datasets ingested into The Hive as part of this pilot project must be authored by a member of the University of Utah research community and must be complete, digital, less than 500 GB, and publicly available by August 2017. We are not accepting confidential or sensitive data into The Hive at this time. Please feel free to contact Rebekah Cummings at Rebekah.cummings@utah.edu or Daureen Nesdill daureen.nesdill@utah.edu if you have any additional questions.


SUMMER INTRAMURAL SPORTS REGISTRATION DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY, MAY 31

Join the summer fun. Intramural Sports registration is still open and we have a few spots available for softball, soccer and sand volleyball.

Register a full team or join a team as a free agent. 

Register today at imleagues.com/utah.


Tanner Humanities Center selects poet and BYU professor as the 2017-18 Marlin K. Jensen Scholar and Artist in Residence

The Obert C. and Grace A. Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah selected Kimberly Johnson as the 2017-2018 Marlin K. Jensen Scholar and Artist in Residence fellow. Johnson, U alumnus and professor and associate chair of English at Brigham Young University,  is the recipient of numerous awards including fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Utah Arts Council and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Her latest book of poetry, “Uncommon Prayer,” was published in 2014. Johnson’s fellowship will consist of a semester-long residency at the Tanner Humanities Center beginning in spring 2018. She will lead a semester-length poetry course for U students and lifelong learners featuring a series of guest poets and public readings. She will also contribute to Mormon Studies curriculum planning and program development.


LEARNING ABROAD DEADLINE: FALL, FALL BREAK AND ACADEMIC YEAR GLOBAL CAMPUS, AFFILIATE AND FACULTY-LED PROGRAM APPLICATIONS

Students applying for a Learning Abroad Global campus, affiliate and faculty-led programs should complete their Learning Abroad Applications by 11:59 MST on June 1 for the following terms:
  • Fall 
  • Fall break 
  • Academic year 

Please note that affiliate application deadlines may vary.

The deadline for Learning Abroad exchange programs for fall and academic year programs is March 1.

Check out all of the possibilities and deadlines by using the Learning Abroad program search.

Deadlines that fall on a Saturday or Sunday will be extended to the following Monday. 


CAMPUS RECREATION IS HIRING PERSONAL TRAINERS

Join our Crimson Crew team as a Personal Trainer and help others reach their goals. You must be a current U student, be PT certified and have some prior experience.

To apply, contact Cairistiona Flatley, cflatley@crs.utah.edu.


SUPPORT NATIONAL PARKS BY USING ZIMRIDE


The web-based ridesharing service Zimride, which is available at the University of Utah, will donate $1 to the National Park Foundation for every new member or new ride posted in April up to $10,000.

In addition, Enterprise Holdings Inc., which owns Zimride, will match Zimride’s contributions dollar for dollar.

Sign up and post a ride here.


Highlighted Events

FREE YOGA FROM MAY-JULY 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50-minute yoga sessions from May-July 2017 on Mondays and Wednesdays, on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library.

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk.

Please send us feedback here.


MEMORIAL DAY – NO CLASSES
Monday, May 29, 2017

Memorial Day is a university closure day. No classes will be held.


UIT TALKS: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE LIBRARY OVERVIEW
Tuesday, May 30, 2017 | 1-1:30 p.m.
Zion Conference Room 5150, 102 S. 200 E. Salt Lake City

UIT Talks is a new semi-regular town hall program designed to provide information and dialog opportunities for the University of Utah community regarding University Information Technology (UIT) initiatives, projects, and services.

Craig  Bennion, of Network and Communications Infrastructure, will present.


FREE INTRODUCTION TO MINDFULNESS SESSIONS
Wednesday, May 31, 2017 | 12-1 p.m.
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 | 8-9 a.m.
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 | 12-1 p.m.
Health Sciences Education Building, Room 2948

In celebration of National Meditation Month, please join us in exploring and experiencing what mindfulness has to offer.   The University of Utah Health Office of Wellness & Integrative Health, the Resiliency Center and the GME Wellness Program are kicking off a series of FREE, introductory mindfulness sessions.  We will be running classes through the summer.  Stay tuned for times.  We will run a formal 8-week course in the fall.  Classes will be led by Trinh Mai, faculty in the College of Social Work.
  • Wednesday, June 7 will be held in HSEB 3420.

MAY IS NATIONAL BIKE MONTH

Through Wednesday, May 31, 2017

May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists and celebrated in communities from coast to coast. Established in 1956, National Bike Month is a chance to discover the many benefits of bicycling. 

The University of Utah is a Bicycle Friendly University, recognized by the League of American Bicyclists for promoting and providing a more bikeable campus for students, staff and visitors. Those who bike to campus save money on fuel, spend less time in traffic congestion, and integrate physical activity into their daily routine. Biking also helps alleviate personal stress, reduce rush-hour congestion, vehicle emissions and fuel consumption and lessens the amount of parking needed.

Get on your bike and celebrate at these local events during Bike Month, or give biking to campus a try.

Learn more here.


2017 ADDICTIONS UPDATE CONFERENCE: SCIENCE, POLICY AND TREATMENT
Thursday, June 1-Saturday, June 3, 2017
University Park Marriott, 480 Wakara Way

This unique two-day conference will explore critical, and timely, issues related to the science, policy, and treatment of substance use and abuse. It is a CEU/CME-accredited event offering a variety of topics, speakers, optional post-conference workshops, and plenary talks by nationally acclaimed experts.

This conference is designed to join medical, addiction, and behavioral health professionals and those influencing those practices. It will facilitate an increased knowledge of substance use disorder issues facing today’s diverse society in order to develop and implement effective prevention and intervention/treatment programs and strategies through science, policy and practice. Ultimately, this will improve systems, clinical modalities and client care in individual and community practices and programs.

Register here.


SALT DANCE FEST
Monday, June 5, 2017 | 9:30 a.m.-4:45 p.m.
Alice Sheets Marriott Center for Dance

Salt Dance Fest 2017 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers Shinichi and Dana Iova-Koga, Joanna Kotze, Katie Scherman and Idan Shirabi, along with esteemed SLC dance artists Molly Heller and Satu Hummasti for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the spirited exchange of ideas, June 5-16, 2017.

More information can be found here.


STANDUP PADDLEBOARD YOGA
Saturday, June 10, 2017 | 9-10:15 a.m.
Eccles Student Life Center

Join us for another exciting session of Stand Up Paddleboard Yoga. The cost of this event is $10.

This event always sells out fast so get registered early. 

Click here to register today.


THE SCIENCE BEHIND HEADACHE AND MINDFUL YOGA
Tuesday, June 13, 2017 | 6:15 p.m. Registration, 7:30 p.m. yoga
Imaging & Neurosciences Center, 729 Arapeen Drive, Large conference room

The Headache School, brought to you by the University of Utah Department of Neurology’s Headache Outreach Program, is supported in part by the Danielle Byron Henry Migraine Foundation. Our mission is to educate sufferers of migraine and headaches in a collaborative, supportive environment. Our vision is to eliminate suffering for migraine and headache through education.

Join us for bi-weekly educational and therapeutic sessions with the experts at no cost.


MIGRAINE FOUNDATIONS HOSTS ‘SHINE HER LIGHT’ FUNDRAISER
Friday, June 16, 2017 | 6 p.m.
Gallivan Center

The public is invited to celebrate the second “Shine Her Light” fundraiser benefiting the Danielle Byron Henry Migraine Foundation. The fundraiser will be held on June 16 at 6 p.m. at the Gallivan Center and will feature dinner, spirits, and entertainment. Tickets are available now at daniellefoundation.org.
 
The Danielle Byron Henry Migraine Foundation was established in March 2016 to increase public awareness of migraine disease and its impact on patients, their families, and society. “The most difficult part of migraine disease is that it is largely unseen and misunderstood,” says Dan Henry, M.D., who specializes in headache and migraine disorders, particularly in children and young adults, at Foothill Family Clinic in Salt Lake City. “This fundraiser is an opportunity for the public to learn more about migraine disease while enjoying a fun evening benefiting our community.”

The Foundation’s mission is to provide access to comprehensive treatment and support for those living with migraine disease, especially young adults and children. This year, the Foundation has funded “Headache School,” in conjunction with the University of Utah, offering bi-weekly educational and therapeutic sessions with experts at no cost. The Foundation is also sponsoring free professionally moderated support groups for individuals between ages 13-19 with migraines. The ultimate goal of the Foundation is to help build a comprehensive headache treatment center in the Intermountain area.


MONDAY FAMILY NIGHTS
Monday, June 19, 2017 | 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Red Butte Garden

Explore the diversity in our community! Bring a picnic and blanket to enjoy a performance in the Red Butte Garden Courtyard/Four Seasons Garden and share in a Garden related craft or activity to wrap up the evening.

For a list of performances and dates, click here.


ARE YOU NORMAL? BLOCK U: MEDICAL HUMANITIES, A CAPSTONE INITIATIVES PROJECT
Through June 26, 2017
Level 2, Dumke Fine Arts Library & Digital Matters Lab

We invite you to explore the great range of human diversity with us. The biological bases for who we are–as humans and as individuals–are not fixed and not uniform. No two of us are the same. As a result, categories constructed to divide us from each other, based on concepts like race or gender, need to be examined and questioned.

Even those variations that fall farther from the average–those we typically deem “disabilities,” like deafness and Down syndrome–bring tangible and intangible benefits to those who carry them and the communities in which they live.

Give the challenge of defining “normal,” new genetic tools that promise to correct “abnormalities” and improve human life demand scrutiny. What are their promises and pitfalls? They may empower parents desperate to change the biological inheritance of their offspring. But they may also further privilege those with many advantages.
These technologies also suggest radical possibilities: Could we amplify the already vast diversity of human forms? Why not consider the strengths of other species–and reimagine our own?

Join us, and ask yourself…Are you normal?


BOOKING A BROUHAHA
Through June 30, 2017
Level 4, Special Collections Gallery

Book Arts Program students trigger quite a commotion as they showcase the final editions and ingenious bookwork created as part of spring semester’s courses. As the world of the printed page explodes in different directions, these students utilize the ensuing pandemonium to instigate stunning innovations in the art of the book.

The exhibition is free and open to the public.

For more information, visit bookartsprogram.org.


VIKINGS: BEYOND THE LEGEND

Saturday, May 27, 2017-Monday, Jan. 1, 2018


What if the blood-thirsty plunderers you once thought you knew, were really just misunderstood explorers, farmers and traders?

Come explore Vikings to discover the truth about the Vikings age and dispel long-held stereotypes about its people, traditions and influence. Find yourself captivated by more than 400 authentic artifacts- some never before seen outside Scandinavia — including jewelry, funeral urns, weapons, game pieces, clothing and even a piece of 1,000-year-old Viking bread.

When you visit Vikings at Natural History Museum of Utah you will:

  • Imagine a Viking voyage as you marvel a full-scale replica of a Viking ship
  • Play a digital version of a popular Viking strategy game that pre-dates chess
  • Test the balance between the blade and handle of a replica Viking sword
  • Excavate a spectacular Viking burial boat, layer by layer, on an interactive touch table

Click here for more information and go here for hours and admission prices.