MEET THE GRADUATES: CLASS OF 2017

“After I served my country for two years, I didn’t want to go back to the U.S. to finish my architecture degree (I went to Savannah College of Art and Design in Georgia before my service). I wanted to stay in Korea for a while and audition for ‘K-pop Star,’ but after three failed auditions, I decided to go back to school.

Because I became deeply interested in politics and media, I looked for various ways to transfer to another school to major in communication. I also wanted to stay in Korea but wanted to get an American education. Coincidentally, I heard that a famous American university opened a new campus in Songdo, South Korea (University of Utah Asia Campus), so I thought that would be the best opportunity to change my life.

I think professors here are so amazing because of how they guide and inspire me to achieve my future dreams. One of my professors encouraged me to start making videos, so I started a YouTube channel, “Warub Couple” to introduce my Korean friends to American culture and I eventually plan to do videos that will introduce my American friends to Korean culture.

After graduation, I plan to go back to Korea and work for a major media corporation.”

— Kangho Lee, class of 2017, part of the first graduating class from the University Asia Campus

“Ever since I was a little girl I’ve wanted to catch bad guys. I’ve always been passionate about public service and protecting people who can’t protect themselves.

I received a bachelor’s degree from Weber State University in criminal justice and psychology and was going to go on to get a master’s degree. I put that on hold after I was hired in September 2012 by the Unified Police Department.

I work graveyards as a patrol officer and have secondary assignments in the high-risk victims unit and as a field training officer. I also work security at St. Mark’s Hospital.

Two years ago, I applied for the U’s Master of International Affairs and Global Enterprise. I am the first in my immediate family to get a master’s degree.

I want to work in international law — international drug or human trafficking or counter terrorism. In the MIAGE program I was able to tailor classes to my work and career interests — counter terrorism, immigration law, national security policy, criminal justice policy.

I was the back-up officer on a domestic violence call. The victim was very reluctant to gives us information because she was afraid of deportation. But in my immigration law class I had learned about federal protections for domestic violence victims and I was able to tell her if she came forward that wouldn’t happen. It felt great. It was one more tool I had, one more word of advice I could give this victim.

I am celebrating graduation by participating in the Police Unity Tour bike ride from New Jersey to Washington, D.C., which honors fallen officers and raises money for their memorial. I will be riding for officers Doug Barney, Cody Brotherson, Eric Ellsworth and K9 Officer Aldo.”

Chelsea Winslow, Class of 2017, master of international affairs and global enterprise

“My wife Cassidy and I met in gen chem. I was her TA. For part of our first date I took her to the ACS lab and showed her some demos.

I proposed on Feb. 15, 2015. I asked U police if I could get on the roof of the chemistry building to propose. I used some “gun cotton” which is nitrated cotton that burns really quickly. I told Cassidy I’d been given access to the roof of HEB. She went up to the roof with me and I had her light pieces of gun cotton. I had to keep giving her gun cotton because I couldn’t see where the ring box was. I found it, pulled it out and proposed. She said yes!

Cassidy is now in Pharmacy school and I’ll be teaching chemistry at Springville High, my old high school. There’s so much I’ve learned that I’ll take with me. One thing is the idea of trying to understand each individual student and what they’re going through.

It’s because of coming to the U and the people here that I’m able to graduate and have a job and the relationship I have with my wife. I owe a lot to this school.”

— Carter Jennings, Class of 2017, chemistry major

“Dental school anywhere is a wild adventure, but when you’re in the first class at a brand new dental school, it’s even more of a wild ride. I wanted to make sure I broadened my experiences in school. It was all about avoiding the tunnel vision of just studying all day long.

Early on, my classmates and I started thinking, “Well, we need student government, and we need to start some organizations.” As part of the first class, you have that responsibility to start establishing programs that future students can pursue, grow, and develop leadership opportunities. So, we started a chapter of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), which presented a great opportunity to engage my peers, interact with pre-dental students, volunteer out in the community, learn about advocacy for our profession and patients and even plan social activities.

National ASDA hosts a Gold Crown Award Ceremony every year, where awards are given to chapters for various achievements. Last year, we won a Gold Crown Award for Rookie Chapter of the Year, which is given to a chapter at a dental school three years or less in age. To receive that award was amazing — it was almost like, “Oh my goodness, our baby is growing up!” And it’s great to see new leaders come in with awesome ideas to help lay the foundation for even more to come.

That’s a huge benefit of coming to a new school. There’s nothing laid in stone just yet, so we can implement new programs and bring forth new ideas. When they selected our class, they chose some awesome, passionate, resilient individuals. There are ups and downs in the whole process, and we have definitely been the guinea pigs for all four years. But it has been a really good experience and it’s something that I would definitely do again.’

— Amber Clark, first graduating class of the new School of Dentistry. Next year, she heads to New York for a general practice residency and will pursue a pediatric dental residency

“I was very close to leaving law school my first semester, but our second semester we were able to start volunteering at clinics like the Pro Bono Initiative – an initiative that offers free legal advice targeting low income families who don’t qualify for any legal aid. It saved my law school career.

Home has always been something important to me. I love traveling, but I’ve always felt very rooted in one place. The idea that so many people have lost that and can’t go back – like my dad who couldn’t go back to Iran for a long time — is particularly gut-wrenching to me.

I grew up in a very international family. My dad is from Iran, my mom is Portuguese and my step-mom is from the Philippines. I began working with refugees when I was in high school. That was just such an impactful experience and I knew that was a community I wanted to work with. I came to law school with this in mind and this has been my entire focus here, even my involvement in the Pro Bono Initiative has been centered around clinics for refugees and immigrants. And after graduation I will be working with a local immigration law firm, Perretta Law, where I will focus on asylum and deportation defense.

I’ve been through a few graduations now. Graduation is a rite of passage, but it means so much for so many people. I hope everyone can see the value in it, especially for families that emigrate here for educational opportunities. Showing up and being a part of the collective experience, especially for those who are first-generation, for those whose families have fled impossible situations, I think the symbolism of that is just so important and so inspiring. It means a lot to me.”

— Mel Moeinvaziri, third year law student, Class of 2017, S.J.Quinney College of Law

“A commitment to my education and a career came after a year of personal tragedies.

In May 2007, I was assaulted and nearly died from a traumatic brain injury. I was placed in a medically induced coma for a month. They didn’t know if I was going to make it.

At the same time this happened to me my mother was in Somalia, caring for my grandfather — the first president of Somalia — as he died at age 98.

In May 2008, almost a year after my severe brain injury, my father passed away from pneumonia. It was very tough for me.

I had just begun taking low-level classes at Salt Lake Community College. The doctors weren’t sure if I was going to be able to take high or even mid-level courses. But I started to heal and was able to go to school and work. I began experiencing seizures because of my head injury, but I finished at SLCC in 2012. I took one semester at the U and then needed to work so I didn’t come back to school fully until 2015. I have not taken a semester off since then.

I am getting a degree in sociology because I like communicating with people and want to assist people who are going through trauma like I did. My ultimate goal is to work with people who have brain injuries.

The fact I made it is a miracle. When I look back to where I was and where I am, I think I’ve accomplished more since my brain injury. Before that, I wasn’t thinking about my career or anything. That brain injury may have made me stronger. I never declared a disability. I want to do things just like everybody else does.

I am going to graduate school, either in Virginia or Minnesota. I am going to miss the U, but there is another road I need to take.

I wish my dad was alive to see me graduate. When he died, I was just at the very start of my schooling. But maybe he will see me when I graduate on May 4.”

— Ibrahim M. Jama, Class of 2017, bachelor of science in sociology

“When I think about my time at the University of Utah, I’m reminded of so much warmth and growth. From my involvement and activism with the Asian American Student Association and the Queer and Trans Students of Color groups, to being a part of the creation of the new School for Cultural and Social Transformation, I was able to find family and community. I felt like I was able to come home to myself, and be in community with folks who I was able to learn and grow with.

I’m especially thankful and inspired by professors such as Dr. Janet Theiss, Dr. Dolores Delgado Bernal and Dr. Edmund Fong who inspire and nurture me, helping me grow as a scholar and activist. They inspire me to find the humor and beauty in all things, and the joy discipline in storytelling and writing.

The U was where I was able to discover who I wanted to be, and create a future for myself as a queer person of color. There’s a lot to be done still at this institution, but in an increasingly cynical world, I find solace and hope in the people I call family at the University of Utah.”

— Heidi Qin, Class of 2017

 

“Life is not fair, life is not easy. You’ve probably heard that from a number of different sources. Advertisements always try to tell you that life is bright and easy — it’s vacations, soft drinks and fried food. But life is hard. And wherever you’re at in life, you have unexpected challenges. Perhaps I’ve seen more of them because I’ve chosen to seek a life of adventure and risk in the high mountains. There’s a certain understanding that one gets through hardship. The basis of that is compassion and empathy for other people. And if you’ve been there and you’ve been through hardship, then you realize what those challenges are.

When you’re a mountain climber, you’re out there suffering away, living off of couscous and a cup of tea, it’s kind of a little self-imposed hardship. But when you come back, we’re fortunate. I’m not for want of food or shelter or transportation. When you experience a little bit of hardship and you realize what hardship entails, it’s motivation for us to give back and to think about the bigger picture. The people who have been humbled and been in other people’s shoes are people who are empathetic. They’re not going to think about the world ending 4 inches past their fingertips. Their world will be, “How are my actions impacting other people?”

We are dependent upon other humans, we are not an island unto ourselves. We are collectively one of 7.4 billion humans on this planet.

Life is short. We’ve got this one chance to make positive changes on our planet.”

— Conrad Anker, world renowned mountain climber, author, filmmaker, philanthropist and University of Utah alumni class of 1988. He will deliver the 2017 commencement address

Continue reading

U COMMENCEMENT 2017

By Annalisa Purser, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

PHOTO CREDIT: Mike Field Photography

Christina Andino is among 8,566 University of Utah students who will graduate this year.

University of Utah student Christina Andino will be among only 0.03 percent of foster youths who graduate from college when she receives a bachelor’s degree this year. After transferring to the U in 2015 from Salt Lake Community College, Andino is graduating with a Bachelor of Social Work and no student loan debt.
 
While Andino is one of a handful of students from similar backgrounds who graduate from college, she is among 8,566 U students who will celebrate their achievements at the university’s 148th commencement exercise Thursday, May 4, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. in the Jon M. Huntsman Center.
 
Andino won’t have much time to celebrate before starting the Master of Social Work program two weeks following graduation. Getting to this point hasn’t been easy, she said, because she didn’t have the parental support that many college students experience, but Andino was determined to work hard to better her future.
 
Andino applied for a variety of scholarships and completed the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, to receive financial aid in order to make higher education a possibility. She also works 30 hours per week for Salt Lake City School District to pay bills for the apartment she shares with her sister. Her goal now is to complete graduate school with no debt as well.
 
The U continues to lead the state for students who graduate with the lowest percentage of loan debt.
 
“Scholarships help our students stay in school and enroll full time to accelerate completion,” said Ruth Watkins, senior vice president for Academic Affairs. “We have seen our graduation rate increase approximately 10 percent in the past five years, and this success can be attributed to efforts to increase access to academic advisers; offering flexible class options, such as online courses and one-week intensive courses; and significantly increasing scholarships and financial assistance.”
 
At the U, Andino met regularly with academic advisers, became involved in the Bachelor of Social Work student association, participated in a practicum experience at University Neighborhood Partners and did a summer internship that took her across the country to speak with educators and colleges about how her past shaped her experience as a college student.
 
“When I turned 18, I had the opportunity to control my life and do something for myself,” Andino said. “It was completely up to me to provide for myself and gain a sense of stability because there wasn’t a plan B.”
 
Andino plans to work with foster youth and others from marginalized communities through offering educational programs in schools, and she is interested in becoming a school administrator.
 
“Education is what got me through foster care,” she said. “School was everything for me — it provided structure and stability and never changed, no matter what was going on in my life. I’ve been motivated to get through school because I don’t want to repeat the cycle of my family.”
 
Her adviser, Jason Atherton, has enjoyed working with Andino, encouraging her to push her boundaries and seeing her grow professionally.
“Her story highlights how higher education should work,” he said. “Looking at where Christina started and how she’s been able to navigate through her undergraduate education, it’s exciting to see how she’s given back to the community and is working toward a career that will allow her to do that for the rest of her life. She’s the perfect example of how higher education offers upward mobility, resources and opportunities. She’s the whole package of a successful student.”
 
General commencement is a campus-wide celebration open to all students, their families and the public. It is an opportunity for the institution to celebrate the graduating class and recognize student achievements. The evening’s program is designed with the graduates in mind and includes videos and multimedia, a collage of Instagram photos documenting the U experience of the Class of 2017, as well as traditional elements of “pomp and circumstance” associated with graduation events.
 
“Commencement is always an exciting time for us because it is the main reason we are here — to help students succeed and reach for their goals,” said U President David W. Pershing. “The members of our graduating class have already achieved so much, and we are excited to see what they continue to accomplish after they leave. The university community proudly recognizes the Class of 2017 and welcomes everyone to join us as we celebrate.”
 
About the graduating class and commencement details: (These numbers are based on data available prior to graduation and are subject to change.)

By the numbers

  • Students in the Class of 2017 represent all 29 Utah counties, all 50 states and 84 countries
  • 8,566 graduates
  • 9,118 degrees (some graduates receive more than one degree); 5,780 bachelor’s degrees; 2,351 master’s degrees; 716 doctoral degrees; 118 juris doctors; 94 doctors of medicine; 59 doctors of pharmacy
  • 4,589 men and 3,977 women
  • 3.33 is the average grade point average
  • 26 is the average age of bachelor’s degree recipients; the youngest undergraduate is 19, the oldest is 64
  • 31 is the average age of students receiving graduate degrees; the youngest is 19 and the oldest is 68
  • The largest number of undergraduate degrees awarded will be in these departments: communication, psychology, economics, nursing, biology, business administration, mechanical engineering, exercise and sport science, health promotion and education, human development and family studies

Two new graduating classes

Speakers

  • President David W. Pershing will officiate
  • Keynote speaker: Conrad Anker
  • Student speaker: Luísa Gerstner da Rosa, who is graduating with a double major in operations management and information systems

Special awards

  • Honorary degrees will be presented to Conrad Anker and Gail Miller.
  • The Rosenblatt Prize for Excellence, a $40,000 cash award and the most prestigious honor the university bestows on its faculty, will be announced in a separate press release the morning of May 4.
  • Special awards will be given to 11 faculty members.

Schedule for college convocations

  • Each college holds a convocation ceremony, where candidates for graduation are acknowledged individually and where college-specific awards are presented. College convocations are schedules can be found here.

Transportation and parking

  • Campus parking lots may be used at no charge during commencement and convocation ceremonies. As campus parking is limited, visitors are encouraged to use the free U shuttle service to travel between commencement events. Shuttles run throughout campus and are scheduled every 10-15 minutes. The U campus is also a TRAX free fare zone on May 4 and 5.

Watch it later

  • Those unable to attend commencement will be able to watch the live stream on the university’s website, utah.edu, or watch the rebroadcast on KUED, channel 7, Saturday, May 6, at 5:30 p.m. MDT.

NAVIGATING GRADUATION

With 19 convocation events and one big commencement, campus will be bustling with graduation activity this week. For the where and when of all the ceremonies, check out the interactive map, as well as the list below with specific dates, times and locations.

Parking during this time will be limited, but all visitor lots will be open free of charge. We strongly encourage the use of public transit, which is free with your UCard. University shuttles run throughout campus and are scheduled every 10-15 minutes. The U campus will be a TRAX free fare zone on May 4 and 5. Visit these links for visitor parking locationsaccessible parking information, the campus shuttle tracker and UTA bus stops and TRAX stops

For a map with accessible building entrances, click here.

For a map of convocation locations, click the image below.

 

Thursday, May 4

COLLEGE OF HEALTH
(Graduate Students)
1 p.m., Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
9 a.m., Jon M. Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
(Graduate Students)
9 a.m., Kingsbury Hall

GENERAL COMMENCEMENT
6:30 p.m., Jon M. Huntsman Center

Friday, May 5

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE + PLANNING
3 p.m., Olpin Union Ballroom

DAVID ECCLES SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
11:30 a.m., Jon M. Huntsman Center

DESB EXECUTIVE MBA
2 p.m., Rice-Eccles Stadium Tower

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
12 p.m., Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
2 p.m., Jon M. Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS
9 a.m., Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF HEALTH
(Undergraduate students)
7 p.m., Jon M. Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES
9 a.m., Jon M. Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF MINES & EARTH SCIENCES
12 p.m., Olpin Union Ballroom

COLLEGE OF NURSING
3 p.m., Kingsbury Hall

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
9 a.m., Olpin Union Ballroom

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE
(Undergraduate Students)
4:30 p.m., Jon M. Huntsman Center

COLLEGE OF SOCIAL WORK
6 p.m., Kingsbury Hall

Friday, May 12

S.J. QUINNEY COLLEGE OF LAW
10 a.m., Kingsbury Hall

Friday, May 19

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
10 a.m., Kingsbury Hall

Saturday, May 20

SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY
10 a.m., Kingsbury Hall

 

#UTAHGRAD17 PHOTO CONTEST

What’s turned into a University of Utah tradition, the annual Utah Grad photo contest is a great chance for graduates to share the moments that made their college experience a memorable one. This year, more than 500 entries were submitted on Instagram, Twitter and through email. The photos are shown in a video montage at the Huntsman Center before the commencement ceremony, and first, second and third place entries are selected by the Alumni Association, who also sponsors the contest. Prizes include an iPad, Campus Store gift cards and season tickets to Utah football, men’s basketball and gymnastics. So without further ado, here are the winners, and also some of our other favorites.

First Place: Abbygrace Palma

 

Last push. Almost there. #utahgrad17

A post shared by @abbychooo on

Second Place: Courtney Zaffino

3rd Place: Megan Enriquez

And some of our other favorites…

 

Representing my school. #UniversityofUtah #SaltFlats #utahgrad17

A post shared by Fernando Herrera (@fernandoherreraa) on

 

Finishing up junior year with the first friend I made in college ❤️

A post shared by Christine Jaojoco (@christineyy_) on

 

May not be the best picture but definitely the best people! #FABFour @yourcampuslife @universityofutah #utahgrad17

A post shared by Brooke Newhall (@b_rock_it_out31) on

 

The win was kind of ugly, but my roomies are always cute. ❤️??? #UteProud #HolyWar

A post shared by Lehxi Fulton (@lahexi) on

 

100th win! #utes #football #100wins #utah #UtahGrad17

A post shared by Jenni :] (@jenniloves22) on

 

Throw back to not studying and getting lost in Austria #goutes #UtahGrad17

A post shared by Matt Miller (@millermatthewsteven) on

One month until graduation where I shall blossom into a fully fledged biologist. ?#utahgrad17

A post shared by Tina Xu (@xutina) on

Graduating in Accounting. I finally learned how to use an abacus. #graduation #utahgrad17

A post shared by William Maguire (@william.maguire) on

Secretly hoped I'd fall so I wouldn't have to leave U. #UtahGrad17 #EcclesExperience • PC: @nateleishman13

A post shared by Conor Lyne (@conorlyne) on

Announcements

JUMP TO:
New U chief information security officer named
Celebrate National Bike Month
Study abroad survey
J. Willard Marriott Library receives grant to foster creation of digital newspaper platforms
Landscape Master Plan survey
Support national parks by using Zimride
Cart safety and guidelines


NEW U CHIEF INFORMATION SECURITY OFFICER NAMED


The University of Utah has hired Randall (Randy) J. Arvay, chief information security officer (CISO) at The University of Mississippi Medical Center, as the school’s new CISO, effective May 22, 2017.

Prior to his role at the University of Mississippi, he was chief of the cybersecurity and quality assurance in the Joint Spectrum Center for the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). With a $30 million budget and a team of 200 defense and contract employees, he was accountable for all cyber operations in all technical and non-technical aspects of cyberspace and overall information assurance, risk management and regulatory compliance.

“Dr. Arvay comes to the university with a wealth of IT experience in cybersecurity and many accomplishments in computing,” said Stephen Hess, chief information officer for the U. “He understands the issues, policy, technology and risks and has the ability to explain them in simple terms. He will be a good addition to lead our already excellent information security team and will reach out to the campus community to raise our level of IT security.

During his career, Arvay has been a U.S. Army lieutenant colonel, with an exemplary educational background in computer science, information systems and software engineering. He also has significant experience serving as an assistant professor at the United States Naval Academy and as an adjunct instructor with the University of Miami.

“With his unique professional background, which includes information security leadership for a medical center, in addition to technical and faculty experience, we’re extremely pleased that Dr. Arvay will assume the role of CISO for University Health and the main campus,” said James Turnbull, chief information officer, University Health.

Arvay is a certified information systems security professional, project management professional and has top-secret Department of Defense clearance.

“I’m excited for the opportunity to join the UIT leadership team and work with the well-established group of professionals on the security staff as we refine the enterprise security strategy and continue to support operational security for the University of Utah and University Health,” Arvay said.

Corey Roach has been serving as interim CISO since September 2016 and will return to his role as manager for enterprise security.


CELEBRATE NATIONAL BIKE MONTH


May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists and celebrated in communities from coast to coast. Established in 1956, National Bike Month is a chance to discover the many benefits of bicycling. 

The University of Utah is a Bicycle Friendly University, recognized by the League of American Bicyclists for promoting and providing a more bikeable campus for students, staff, and visitors. Those who bike to campus save money on fuel, spend less time in traffic congestion, and integrate physical activity into their daily routine. Biking also helps alleviate personal stress, reduce rush-hour congestion, vehicle emissions and fuel consumption and lessens the amount of parking needed.


STUDY ABROAD SURVEY


The University of Utah is part of IIE’s Generation Study Abroad, an initiative launched in 2014 with the goal of doubling the number of U.S. students studying abroad by the end of the decade.

IIE is conducting a national survey of study abroad alumni. The survey aims to collect information about the role study abroad plays in developing competencies for the job market. The findings will be shared widely with universities and policy makers.

Eligibility: Participants must have studied abroad during or after the 1999/00 academic year, while seeking an undergraduate or graduate degree from a U.S. higher education institution.

We encourage all eligible students, faculty or staff to complete the survey.

The online study abroad survey will be open until May 10, 2017.  Take the six-minute survey and share.

For more information about global opportunities at the U, contact the Office for Global Engagement at 801.587.8888 or visit global.utah.edu.


J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY RECEIVES GRANT TO FOSTER CREATION OF DIGITAL NEWSPAPER PLATFORMS


The J. Willard Marriott Library at The University of Utah has been awarded, along with the Boston Public Library, a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to develop open source software that will allow organizations worldwide to more easily make their historic newspaper collections digitally accessible.

The Marriott Library and the Boston Public Library will work collaboratively, with input from peers across the nation, to develop newspaper specific functionality within the open source framework, Hydra. Originally developed by Stanford University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Hull (UK), the Hydra framework is highly scalable and sustainable, which is important for libraries and cultural heritage organizations that are just starting to build their digital collections platforms.

Read the full story here.


LANDSCAPE MASTER PLAN SURVEY


Please take a few minutes to help inform our Landscape Master Plan by providing your feedback on the outdoor spaces at the University of Utah.

Please provide your input by Friday, April 28.

Click here to take the survey.


SUPPORT NATIONAL PARKS BY USING ZIMRIDE


The web-based ridesharing service Zimride, which is available at the University of Utah, will donate $1 to the National Park Foundation for every new member or new ride posted in April up to $10,000.

In addition, Enterprise Holdings Inc., which owns Zimride, will match Zimride’s contributions dollar for dollar.

Sign up and post a ride here.


CART SAFETY AND GUIDELINES

An increased number of utility and golf carts are sharing campus walkways with pedestrians, bicycles, skateboards and vehicles (see Policy 3-233: Operation of Motorized Vehicles on Pedestrian Walks).  To promote the safe operation of the carts, U Risk & Insurance Services developed guidelines addressing operator qualifications, cart identification, speed limit and departmental responsibility.

Please review the Cart Use Guidelines found on Risk & Insurance Services website under the “Vehicle” section or contact U Risk & Insurance Services at 1-5590 for additional information.


 

Student Life

JUMP TO:
New U Chief Information Security Officer named
Celebrate National Bike Month
Study Abroad survey
This week’s Red & White Friday winner
J. Willard Marriott Library receives grant to foster creation of digital newspaper platforms
Order your thesis or dissertation
Landscape Master Plan survey
Support national parks by using Zimride


NEW U CHIEF INFORMATION SECURITY OFFICER NAMED


The University of Utah has hired Randall (Randy) J. Arvay, chief information security officer (CISO) at Mississippi Medical Center, as the school’s new CISO, effective May 22, 2017.

Prior to his role at the University of Mississippi, he was chief of the cybersecurity and quality assurance in the Joint Spectrum Center for the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA). With a $30 million budget and a team of 200 defense and contract employees, he was accountable for all cyber operations in all technical and non-technical aspects of cyberspace and overall information assurance, risk management and regulatory compliance.

“Dr. Arvay comes to the university with a wealth of IT experience in cybersecurity and many accomplishments in computing,” said Stephen Hess, chief information officer for the U. “He understands the issues, policy, technology and risks and has the ability to explain them in simple terms. He will be a good addition to lead our already excellent information security team and will reach out to the campus community to raise our level of IT security.

During his career, Arvay has been a U.S. Army lieutenant colonel, with an exemplary educational background in computer science, information systems and software engineering. He also has significant experience serving as an assistant professor at the United States Naval Academy and as an adjunct instructor at the University of Miami.

“With his unique professional background, which includes information security leadership for a medical center, in addition to technical and faculty experience, we’re extremely pleased that Dr. Arvay will assume the role of CISO for University Health and the main campus,” said James Turnbull, chief information officer, University Health.

Arvay is a certified information systems security professional, project management professional and has top-secret Department of Defense clearance.

“I’m excited for the opportunity to join the UIT leadership team and work with the well-established group of professionals on the security staff as we refine the enterprise security strategy and continue to support operational security for the University of Utah and University Health,” Arvay said.

Corey Roach has been serving as interim CISO since September 2016 and will return to his role as manager for enterprise security.


CELEBRATE NATIONAL BIKE MONTH


May is National Bike Month, sponsored by the League of American Bicyclists and celebrated in communities from coast to coast. Established in 1956, National Bike Month is a chance to discover the many benefits of bicycling.

The University of Utah is a Bicycle Friendly University, recognized by the League of American Bicyclists for promoting and providing a more bikeable campus for students, staff, and visitors. Those who bike to campus save money on fuel, spend less time in traffic congestion, and integrate physical activity into their daily routine. Biking also helps alleviate personal stress, reduce rush-hour congestion, vehicle emissions and fuel consumption and lessens the amount of parking needed.


STUDY ABROAD SURVEY


The University of Utah is part of IIE’s Generation Study Abroad, an initiative launched in 2014 with the goal of doubling the number of U.S. students studying abroad by the end of the decade.

IIE is conducting a national survey of study abroad alumni. The survey aims to collect information about the role study abroad plays in developing competencies for the job market. The findings will be shared widely with universities and policy makers.

Eligibility: Participants must have studied abroad during or after the 1999/00 academic year, while seeking an undergraduate or graduate degree from a U.S. higher education institution.

We encourage all eligible students, faculty or staff to complete the survey.

The online study abroad survey will be open until May 10, 2017.  Take the 6-minute survey and share.

For more information about global opportunities at the U, contact the Office for Global Engagement at 801.587.8888 or visit global.utah.edu.


J. WILLARD MARRIOTT LIBRARY RECEIVES GRANT TO FOSTER CREATION OF DIGITAL NEWSPAPER PLATFORMS


The J. Willard Marriott Library at The University of Utah has been awarded, along with the Boston Public Library, a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to develop open source software that will allow organizations worldwide to more easily make their historic newspaper collections digitally accessible.

The Marriott Library and the Boston Public Library will work collaboratively, with input from peers across the nation, to develop newspaper specific functionality within the open source framework, Hydra. Originally developed by Stanford University, the University of Virginia, and the University of Hull (UK), the Hydra framework is highly scalable and sustainable, which is important for libraries and cultural heritage organizations that are just starting to build their digital collections platforms.

Read the full story here.


ORDER YOUR THESIS OR DISSERTATION

For a limited time, special discounts are available to graduating students who print their Thesis or Dissertation on the Espresso Book Machine. Print unlimited copies in soft cover for just $15 each. With no set up fees or hidden charges, these bookstore quality prints are a great thank you gift to parents, friends, or professors.

Orders are typically filled in two business days; same-day pickup is available with an appointment.

Contact the Reserve Desk to schedule an appointment or visit our website to start your order.

For more information, click here.


LANDSCAPE MASTER PLAN SURVEY


Please take a few minutes to help inform our Landscape Master Plan by providing your feedback on the outdoor spaces at the University of Utah.

Please provide your input by Friday, April 28.

Click here to take the survey.


SUPPORT NATIONAL PARKS BY USING ZIMRIDE


The web-based ridesharing service Zimride, which is available at the University of Utah, will donate $1 to the National Park Foundation for every new member or new ride posted in April up to $10,000.

In addition, Enterprise Holdings Inc., which owns Zimride, will match Zimride’s contributions dollar for dollar.

Sign up and post a ride here.


Highlighted Events

SWEAT THE STRESS: FREE FITNESS CLASSES DURING FINALS WEEK
Monday, May 1–Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Eccles Student Life Center

Sweat the stress during finals week with our FREE fitness classes. 

No registration is required; first come, first served. 

Click here for a list of classes.


THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION AND HEALTHCARE: THE FIRST 100 DAYS
Monday, May 1, 2017 | 5-7 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law, Moot Courtroom, Level 6

The panel will discuss the first 100 days of the Trump administration on healthcare — and specifically implications going forward for Utah.

Register online here.

Speakers:

Nathan Checketts, Director, Health Financing and Medicaid, Utah Department of Health
Stephen Foxley, Director of Government Affairs, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah
Dave Gessel, Executive Vice President, Utah Hospital Association
Matthew Slonaker, Executive Director, Utah Health Policy Project
Douglas Springmeyer, Vice President, Governmental Affairs, Molina Healthcare of Utah


FREE YOGA FROM MAY-JULY 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50 minute yoga sessions from May-July 2017 on Mondays and Wednesdays, on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library.

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk.

Please send us feedback here.


2017 GENERAL COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY
Thursday, May 4, 2017 | 6:30 p.m.
Huntsman Center


Our general commencement ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Jon M. Huntsman Center and will include all colleges except the S.J. Quinney College of Law, the School of Medicine, and the School of Dentistry..

Conrad Anker – speaker, U alumnus and world-renowned mountaineer and author – will deliver this year’s keynote address. The Board of Trustees will also award honorary doctorate degrees to Mr. Anker and Gail Miller.

If you have questions concerning commencement ceremonies, college convocations, or graduation, you can either contact the office of your dean or Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Mary Parker at mgparker@sa.utah.edu or 801-581-3490.

Please join us in congratulating the Class of 2017 during this special evening.


ANNUAL STUDENT ART EXHIBITION
Through-May 5, 2017 | Open Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Alvin Gitting Gallery, 375 S. 1530 East, SLC

Visit the student art exhibition.

Juror: Whitney Tasse, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts


THE SEARCH FOR LINCOLN: AVARD FAIRBANKS AND THE WORK OF A LIFETIME
Ongoing through Friday, May 5, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 1

The class of 1965-66 gifted the Marriott Library with one of Avard Fairbank’s famous sculptures of Abraham Lincoln. Titled “Young Lincoln,” it stands in the gallery on the first floor.  Last year, his son, Eugene Fairbanks donated his father’s manuscripts and photo collections to the library. The collection includes photos, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and research that are enough to cover the entire first floor gallery with the story of the Lincoln statue.


FACULTY CLUB: BUSINESS MEETING AND DINNER
Saturday, May 6, 2017 | 6:30 p.m.
Old Mill Golf Course Clubhouse, 6080 Wasatch Blvd.

Dinner is free for you and guest, but RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED.

Please contact Maddy Oritt at 801-581-5203 or maddy.oritt@utah.edu.


CITY OF ROCKS CLIMBING TRIP WITH OUTDOOR ADVENTURES
Pre-tip meeting on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 | 5 p.m.
Friday, May 12-Sunday, May 14, 2017
City of Rocks, Idaho


Join Outdoor Adventures on an exciting weekend trip to the famous City of Rocks. The trip will cost $100 + tax.
Trips don’t disappoint and this one will be no exception.  
Register early by calling Outdoor Adventures at 801-581-8516 or stop by in person at the Student Life Center.


LONE PEAK BACKPACKING TRIP
Pre-trip Meeting: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 | 5 p.m.
Friday, May 19–Sunday, May 21, 2017
Lone Peak Wilderness, Sandy

Take a short trip with us in our own backyard as we backpack the Lone Peak Wilderness area.  The trip will cost $50 + tax.Backpacking Lone Peak is a great a trip for both experienced and beginning trekkers.
Register at Outdoor Adventures in the Student Life Center or call 801-581-8516.


ARE YOU NORMAL? BLOCK U: MEDICAL HUMANITIES, A CAPSTONE INITIATIVES PROJECT
Through June 26, 2017
Level 2, Dumke Fine Arts Library & Digital Matters Lab

We invite you to explore the great range of human diversity with us. The biological bases for who we are–as humans and as individuals–are not fixed and not uniform. No two of us are the same. As a result, categories constructed to divide us from each other, based on concepts like race or gender, need to be examined and questioned.

Even those variations that fall farther from the average–those we typically deem “disabilities,” like deafness and Down syndrome–bring tangible and intangible benefits to those who carry them and the communities in which they live.

Give the challenge of defining “normal,” new genetic tools that promise to correct “abnormalities” and improve human life demand scrutiny. What are their promises and pitfalls? They may empower parents desperate to change the biological inheritance of their offspring. But they may also further privilege those with many advantages.
These technologies also suggest radical possibilities: Could we amplify the already vast diversity of human forms? Why not consider the strengths of other species–and reimagine our own?

Join us, and ask yourself…Are you normal?

Campus Events

SWEAT THE STRESS: FREE FITNESS CLASSES DURING FINALS WEEK
Monday, May 1–Wednesday, May 3, 2017
Eccles Student Life Center

Sweat the stress during finals week with our FREE fitness classes. 

No registration is required; first come, first served. 

Click here for a list of classes.


THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION AND HEALTHCARE: THE FIRST 100 DAYS
Monday, May 1, 2017 | 5-7 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law, Moot Courtroom, Level 6

The panel will discuss the first 100 days of the Trump administration on healthcare — and specifically implications going forward for Utah.

Register online here.

Speakers:

Nathan Checketts, Director, Health Financing and Medicaid, Utah Department of Health
Stephen Foxley, Director of Government Affairs, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Utah
Dave Gessel, Executive Vice President, Utah Hospital Association
Matthew Slonaker, Executive Director, Utah Health Policy Project
Douglas Springmeyer, Vice President, Governmental Affairs, Molina Healthcare of Utah


FREE YOGA FROM MAY-JULY 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50 minute yoga sessions from May-July 2017 on Mondays and Wednesdays, on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library.

Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk.

Please send us feedback here.


2017 GENERAL COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY
Thursday, May 4, 2017 | 6:30 p.m.
Huntsman Center


Our general commencement ceremony will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Jon M. Huntsman Center and will include all colleges except the S.J. Quinney College of Law, the School of Medicine, and the School of Dentistry..

Conrad Anker – speaker, U alumnus and world-renowned mountaineer and author – will deliver this year’s keynote address. The Board of Trustees will also award honorary doctorate degrees to Mr. Anker and Gail Miller.

If you have questions concerning commencement ceremonies, college convocations, or graduation, you can either contact the office of your dean or Associate Vice President for Enrollment Management Mary Parker at mgparker@sa.utah.edu or 801-581-3490.

Please join us in congratulating the Class of 2017 during this special evening.


ANNUAL STUDENT ART EXHIBITION
Through-May 5, 2017 | Open Monday-Friday 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Alvin Gitting Gallery, 375 S. 1530 East, SLC

Visit the student art exhibition.

Juror: Whitney Tasse, curator of modern and contemporary art at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts


THE SEARCH FOR LINCOLN: AVARD FAIRBANKS AND THE WORK OF A LIFETIME
Ongoing through Friday, May 5, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 1

The class of 1965-66 gifted the Marriott Library with one of Avard Fairbank’s famous sculptures of Abraham Lincoln. Titled “Young Lincoln,” it stands in the gallery on the first floor.  Last year, his son, Eugene Fairbanks donated his father’s manuscripts and photo collections to the library. The collection includes photos, scrapbooks, memorabilia, and research that are enough to cover the entire first floor gallery with the story of the Lincoln statue.


FACULTY CLUB: BUSINESS MEETING AND DINNER
Saturday, May 6, 2017 | 6:30 p.m.
Old Mill Golf Course Clubhouse, 6080 Wasatch Blvd.

Dinner is free for you and guest, but RESERVATIONS ARE REQUIRED.

Please contact Maddy Oritt at 801-581-5203 or maddy.oritt@utah.edu.


CITY OF ROCKS CLIMBING TRIP WITH OUTDOOR ADVENTURES
Pre-tip meeting on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 | 5 p.m.
Friday, May 12-Sunday, May 14, 2017
City of Rocks, Idaho


Join Outdoor Adventures on an exciting weekend trip to the famous City of Rocks. The trip will cost $100 + tax.
Trips don’t disappoint and this one will be no exception.  
Register early by calling Outdoor Adventures at 801-581-8516 or stop by in person at the Student Life Center.


LONE PEAK BACKPACKING TRIP
Pre-trip Meeting: Tuesday, May 16, 2017 | 5 p.m.
Friday, May 19–Sunday, May 21, 2017
Lone Peak Wilderness, Sandy

Take a short trip with us in our own backyard as we backpack the Lone Peak Wilderness area.  The trip will cost $50 + tax.Backpacking Lone Peak is a great a trip for both experienced and beginning trekkers.
Register at Outdoor Adventures in the Student Life Center or call 801-581-8516.


ARE YOU NORMAL? BLOCK U: MEDICAL HUMANITIES, A CAPSTONE INITIATIVES PROJECT
Through June 26, 2017
Level 2, Dumke Fine Arts Library & Digital Matters Lab

We invite you to explore the great range of human diversity with us. The biological bases for who we are–as humans and as individuals–are not fixed and not uniform. No two of us are the same. As a result, categories constructed to divide us from each other, based on concepts like race or gender, need to be examined and questioned.

Even those variations that fall farther from the average–those we typically deem “disabilities,” like deafness and Down syndrome–bring tangible and intangible benefits to those who carry them and the communities in which they live.

Give the challenge of defining “normal,” new genetic tools that promise to correct “abnormalities” and improve human life demand scrutiny. What are their promises and pitfalls? They may empower parents desperate to change the biological inheritance of their offspring. But they may also further privilege those with many advantages.
These technologies also suggest radical possibilities: Could we amplify the already vast diversity of human forms? Why not consider the strengths of other species–and reimagine our own?

Join us, and ask yourself…Are you normal?

A Healthier U


PROTEIN MYTHS AND FACTS

  1. Myth: More protein = more muscle

Fact: Consuming more protein in your diet isn’t enough (on its own) to build or maintain muscle strength and mass. Consistent strength training is necessary for building lean muscle mass. Lifting heavier and heavier weights and other resistance exercises will help your body hold on to and build muscle, especially as you age.

  1. Myth: The more protein you eat the better

Fact: Most Americans eating a typical Western diet are consuming adequate amounts of protein. Individuals on a strict vegetarian diet likely need to be more conscientious about meeting their protein needs, while many lacto-ovo vegetarians are able to meet their daily requirements with ease.

Adults can absorb roughly 25-30 grams of protein at one sitting. That is equivalent to 2 large eggs, or a 3-ounce portion of meat or poultry. Instead of focusing on packing more protein into your diet, work on re-distributing protein-rich foods evenly throughout the day. Endurance athletes can check their average intake with this formula: 1.2-1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day, depending on activity levels.

  1. Myth: Protein is good, carbohydrates are bad

Fact: Both protein and carbohydrates are part of a nutritionally balanced diet. This can be especially true for endurance athletes, who need adequate carbohydrates to fuel energy needs. As the body’s main energy source, carbohydrates should take up the majority of your plate — remember, fruits, veggies, grains and legumes (beans) are considered carbohydrates.

  1. Myth: High-protein low-carb diets help you lose weight

Fact: Excess protein calories will not magically turn into muscle. Consuming adequate amounts of protein throughout your day can help with satiety — feelings of fullness. However, there is a limit to this effect, and overdoing calories (whether from protein or other macronutrient sources) can eventually lead to weight-gain. If you are interested in increasing feelings of satiety think about swapping some carbohydrate calories for protein-rich calories. An example is: if you usually eat a bagel and cream cheese for breakfast, reduce the bagel portion to make room for eggs or some Greek-style yogurt.

  1. Myth: If you’re tired, you’re probably low on protein

Fact: Feeling fatigued all of the time could be a sign of protein deficiency, but usually only if your protein stores are severely depleted (not something that happens if you skip eating protein-rich foods for a day or so). In most cases feeling tired is likely due to other factors and has nothing to do with your protein intake.

The Bottom Line

Eating excess protein offers no additional benefit to a sports diet. It doesn’t turn in to extra muscle. It is either burned for energy or stored as fat.

Adequate protein is important to build and repair muscles, make new red blood cells, and allow hair and fingernails to grow. Only about 10-15 percent of your day’s calories need to come from protein.

  DAILY PROTEIN REQUIREMENTS 
Population Grams protein per pound of body weight
Sedentary adult 0.4
Recreational cyclist 0.5-0.7
Endurance cyclist 0.6-0.7
Growing teenage athlete 0.7-0.9
Cyclists building muscle mass 0.7-0.8
Cyclist restricting calories 0.8-0.9

 


UNDERSTANDING THE AUTISTIC SPECTRUM

 If you were to stand in front of a panel of young people, could you recognize the autistic child? Probably not. The characteristics of autistic spectrum disorder are as varied as the people who live with it. That is one of the reasons why ASD is so misunderstood. What is an autistic spectrum? And why do we know so little about this disorder?

Read the full story here.

6 THINGS YOU SHOULD DO TO PROTECT YOUR EYES

Your eyes are your windows to the world. One of the most important things you can do to maintain your quality of life is to protect those precious orbs with professional care and simple, everyday habits.
Click here to read the full article.

For more expert health news and information, visit healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed.

Construction & Commuter Updates

NEW:

  • From May 12–16, and again from May 23–25, the area noted in the image below will be closed to pedestrian access while a crane is used to remove items from the lower level of the Marriott Library in preparation for a sculpture garden.
  • The entrances and exits on the south side of the West Parking Garage will be closed as the access roads to the garage are widened; all traffic in and out of the garage will have to access the building at the top floor entryway near the hospital loading dock at the north end of 1900 East. Effective mid May, the top entrance of the garage (at the north end of 1900 East) will be closed for approximately two years and the south entrances will reopen.

 

ONGOING:

  • Installation of IT lines are underway around the Health Sciences Campus and will be blocking off certain parking areas throughout the next few months. No more than 25 parking stalls will be closed at a time.
  • The area surrounding northwest side of the Social & Behavioral Science building will be fenced off for a seismic upgrade. This area will reopen June 2018.
  • Construction has begun at the University Campus Store’s north entrance where a new stairway will be added to connect the store entrance and patio with the sidewalk above. The project is set for completion at the beginning of May 2017, prior to university commencement. During construction, the north entrance will only be accessible via the eastern stairs; the ramp on the northern side will be blocked. ADA access will remain at the store’s south entrance. See image to the right and read the full story here.
  • For the next phase of the Ambulatory Care Center project construction, ramp widening on the west terrace began on April 3.
    Vehicular access to the west terrace from the two south ramps will remain open until this time.
  • Hospital on-demand shuttle is now available from 6 a.m. to midnight. For more information, to view current shuttle routes or to request a pick-up, visit uofubus.com.
  • Areas in lot 39 will be closed off for the installation of poles for new camera systems.
  • From March 1-May 1, 2017, the entrances/exits on the south side of the West Parking Garage will be closed as the access roads to the garage are widened. All traffic in and out of the garage will have to access the building at the top floor entryway near the hospital loading dock at the north end of 1900 East. Starting May 1, the top entrance of the garage (at the north end of 1900 East) will be closed for approximately two years. All vehicles using the garage will have to enter and exit on the south side of the building.  This access way is on the south side of the Moran Eye Center. Due to the height limitations of these two entry points, no tall vehicles will be able to use the garage for approximately two years.
  • The southeast side of the Social and Behavioral Science building will be fenced off for the contractor to use for the storage of materials. The area will reopen at the end of the semester.
  • The Marriott Library HVAC control is being upgraded. A portion of the parking lot will be fenced off for contractor to park their trucks and store materials. This project is continuing into the summer 2017.
  • The demoliton of Milton Bennion Hall is complete. Site preparation for the Executive Education Building is underway in that site.
  • Work is being done on the chiller line between the Fletcher and South physics buildings. ADA access will be provided but there will be no access to the construction area. This is expected to be completed in spring 2017.
  • Work is underway on the high temperature water infrastructure upgrade that will be a disruptive, though rather contained, effort beginning in between the Union and the Student Services Building. There is also work occurring along the Gardner, formerly OSH site, and a new section of trench north of BUC and the Business School. Sidewalks will be intermittently closed, at all times at least one sidewalk, often multiple sidewalks, will remain open for pedestrian access. See map below.
  • Construction of the Carolyn and Kem Gardner Building is underway at the former site of OSH. This project will continue through the summer of 2018.
  • The Alumni House is under renovation. Expect noise and dust disturbance impacting some pedestrian paths. Expected to be complete in fall 2017.
  • Renovations at the Crocker Science Center on President’s Circle continue to progress. The center will be open in the fall of 2017.
  • Construction of the Ski Team Building is underway on the north west corner of the McCarthy Track and Field. This building will be open in late summer 2017.

See the construction impact map below.