HUMANS OF THE U: ERIN HERNANDEZ & ANABEL SANTIAGO

Erin: “We were sitting in Diversity Scholars class and I was talking about a K-pop group with a friend and Anabel was, like, ‘What?! You like them?’ Then we hugged each other.

Anabel: I felt like I needed to explode! I can’t talk about K-pop with a lot of people because they don’t know about it.

Erin: K-pop was the connection but our shared culture is how we got closer.

Anabel: The election is when we realized we shared a cultural connection . . .

Erin: . . . as Latino Americans. Being in the Diversity Scholars class, I have an actual connection to my culture. I don’t think I ever felt that before. All of sudden there were labels and terms and names for things I was feeling. It was really validating. It wasn’t just me going through these things, there are other people who feel this way.

Anabel: I go to a predominately white institution but then I go home and everybody there is Latino. I felt like I wasn’t too Mexican nor too white to fit into either community. Now, I realize a lot of people have felt you can’t fit into two communities. And it’s OK.”

— Erin Hernandez and Anabel Santiago, freshmen Diversity Scholars and Korean pop music fans

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U SHOWCASING FOUR NOVEL TECHNOLOGIES AT CES

By Nick Swisher, marketing and communications manager, Technology and Venture Commercialization  and Brooke Adams, communications specialist with the University Marketing and Communications

Four innovative University of Utah technologies will be exhibited at Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2017, the world’s largest and best-known technology trade show. The event runs from Jan. 5-8 in Las Vegas. It marks the U’s third consecutive year at the event—and largest representation yet. CES, which attracted more than 177,000 visitors and 3,800 exhibitors from around the world last year, introduces next-generation innovations to the marketplace.

“We look forward to our expanded involvement at CES 2017,” said Keith Marmer, executive director of Technology and Venture Commercialization at the U. “It’s likely that only a small portion of the products on display at CES would even exist if it weren’t for the innovations developed and research performed at universities. It is an excellent opportunity for us to showcase the kinds of technologies that may possibly be the future of consumer electronics.”

All four of the U’s technologies at CES will offer demonstrations to attendees and the press. The technologies on exhibit include:

Adaptive Glasses

Adaptive Glasses are smart lenses that in less than a fiftieth of a second automatically put into focus what a user is looking at, whether that object is at a distance or up close. These liquid lenses use a tiny laser and a small amount of electricity to autofocus. They are controlled by an electronic actuator that compresses or stretches the lens based on what the wearer is looking at, thus providing a variable aperture. The glasses work in a similar way to bifocal spectacles in that they provide the user with a range of focus beyond that of traditional eyewear. They are, however, more versatile than bifocals or multifocal glasses as they possess the same function of having focus and different depths without becoming blurry in the other sections of the lenses. The Adaptive Glasses were developed by these members of the U’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Carlos H. Mastrangelo, professor; Nazmul Hasan, graduate research assistant; and Hanseup Kim, associate professor.

UPlay Piano

UPlay Piano is an interactive, web-based instructional software program for teaching young children how to play the piano. Each lesson contains an engaging and beautifully illustrated story to introduce new concepts, demonstrations and game sections to teach theory and musicianship, piano pieces for practice and a test to reinforce knowledge of concepts. The program employs a MIDI link to allow students to interact with the online website while playing on any electronic keyboard. The platform will also include an online database allowing parents and teachers to track student progress. UPlay Piano was developed by these members of the U’s School of Music: Lindsey Wright, associate instructor; Susan Duehlmeier, professor; and Cassandra Olsen-Taylor, adjunct assistant professor; Roger Altizer, director of The GApp Lab; and students at The GApp Lab. Jared A. Pierce, assistant professor of the BYU School of Music and a U alumnus, also was part of the project team.

Tetra Universal Controller

The Tetra Universal Controller is a device that greatly expands the number of input commands to individuals with quadriplegia/tetraplegia who use “sip and puff” systems to control mobility devices. Traditional systems typically only recognize changes in pressure. A hard puff, for instance, might enable a wheelchair to move forward, while a soft sip might stop the wheelchair. The ability to perform complex actions or sequences in these current systems is significantly limited. The Tetra Universal Controller combines pattern recognition, timing and pressure intensity which allows for a virtually unlimited number of control directives. Complex sequences can thus be programmed, enabling multistep movements or operations that will give users more control and independence over their lives. The enhanced ability to utilize complex input commands also enables the control of various household and office electronics (e.g., televisions, thermostats, lighting, doors, windows, etc.). It is even used to control both physical and virtual adaptive skis and kayaks.

The Tetra Universal Controller was developed by Jeffrey Rosenbluth, associate professor, physical medicine and rehabilitation and medical director of the Spinal Cord Injury Acute Rehabilitation program; Ross Imburgia, research engineer, Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation; and Andrew Merryweather, assistant professor, mechanical engineering; Roger Altizer, director of The GApp Lab; and students at The GApp Lab.

Sentinel 100

The Sentinel 100 is a board and chipset based on the work of Cynthia Furse, associate vice president for research and professor in electrical and computer engineering, that enables engineers, original equipment manufacturers, equipment manufacturers and system operators the ability to monitor electrical systems for detection and location of critical faults in live electrical wires when embedded into a product. The credit card-sized board also allows system operators to collect valuable baseline data that can be used to help predict and prevent outages.

PAC-12 COLLABORATION

By Annalisa Purser, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

A new online repository of Pac-12 campus policies is now available to serve as a resource for faculty, staff, administrators and other interested individuals. The database will house information ranging from course sharing to faculty retention to faculty-student issues to budgetary issues to academic freedom to campus safety and sexual assault.

The online system is developed and managed by the Pac-12 Academic Leadership Coalition, or Pac-12 ALC, an academic organization run by faculty governance leaders, including the president of each university’s academic senate, as well as associated staff. The coalition focuses on issues of shared governance but has expanded to collaborate on a variety of topics relevant to higher education.

PHOTO CREDIT: University of Utah

Xan Johnson (current Academic Senate president), Maddy Oritt (executive director of the Pac-12 Academic Leadership Coalition and U Academic Senate secretary), Bill Johnson (president of the Pac-12 ALC and past president of the U Academic Senate)

Two years ago, the group committed to focusing on campus safety and campus climates around sexual assault because it was an important concern facing all institutions in the Pac-12 and an issue faculty felt affected students’ abilities to fully participate in academia. As a result, the University of Utah’s Academic Senate formed the Academic Senate ad hoc Committee on Campus Sexual Assault to develop a campus climate survey for the U, review results, coordinate follow-up efforts and action plans and administer future surveys.

“Sexual assault and campus safety has been at the forefront of many people’s minds, and our Academic Senate takes a holistic approach to the issues facing our campus,” said Bill Johnson, U Academic Senate past president and current president of the Pac-12 ALC. “The safety and well-being of everyone on our campus is important to us, so it followed that the Academic Senate would instigate an effort to address these issues in a disciplined and thoughtful way.”

Since then, three member institutions, including the U, have completed campus climate surveys. In an effort to collaborate and build upon best practices, these survey questions will be added to the new online repository to benefit other Pac-12 institutions.

“While it is important for each school to complete its own survey to understand the unique circumstances facing its students, we felt that sharing resources and best practices with one another would only strengthen what we learn from the process and provide insights beyond what we learn as individual institutions,” Johnson said.

In addition to the climate surveys, the repository will also house information about reporting policies and campus resources. The database will allow member institutions to upload documents about myriad other interest areas, search through policies and peruse white papers that summarize policies from across institutions.

“The idea is to increase communication between Pac-12 universities in terms of the policies, procedures and best practices on issues affecting all of us,” said Chris Sinclair, associate professor of mathematics and Academic Senate vice president at the University of Oregon. “Oftentimes, we have similar types of questions, and we hope this database will be useful in connecting us to what others are doing about common problems. Additionally, the website will have an internal component for members of the Academic Leadership Coalition where they can ask questions of each other and take these ideas back to their senates to have a more informed discussion.”

Faculty and staff are encouraged to visit the online repository once it opens in January. Members of the Pac-12 ALC will contribute pertinent documents to help build it into a useful resource. The information gathered at the beginning of the year will be used to inform the agenda of the Pac-12 ALC’s annual conference, March 3-5, 2017, on the University of Utah campus.

PAY FOR SUCCESS

By Jennifer Nozawa, public relations specialist with the College of Social Work and Brooke Adams, communications specialist with the University Marketing and Communications

Salt Lake County Mayor Ben McAdams recently announced the launch of two new Pay for Success initiatives to address two long-running challenges facing the county: persistent homelessness and adults with repeated stays in jail.

The programs—operated by local nonprofits The Road Home and First Step House—are receiving significant funding from Sorenson Impact Center founder James L. Sorenson. The Sorenson Impact Center, an applied academic institution at the U’s David Eccles School of Business, is providing project management services. The programs will be independently evaluated, using a randomized controlled trial, by the Utah Criminal Justice Center at the University of Utah College of Social Work.

PHOTO CREDIT: Brooke Adams

Homeless camp along 500 South in Salt Lake City.

“We will be able to measure the effectiveness of these innovative programs and report on outcomes that are truly meaningful to our community,” said Rob Butters, director of the Utah Criminal Justice Center. “Collaborating with Salt Lake County on this Pay for Success initiative advances our goals of using evidence-based practices and outcome data to improve the lives of vulnerable populations and to promote social justice.”

The Homes Not Jail program will provide services to improve housing stability, criminal justice and behavioral health outcomes for 315 individuals identified as persistently homeless (meaning they have spent between 90 and 364 days over the previous year in emergency shelter, on the streets or in other homeless circumstances). The Homes Not Jail program participants will have improved access to a range of housing assistance and support services, including access to behavioral health treatment, employment counseling and rental assistance.

“The rigorous research that will accompany this collaboration will be particularly helpful,” said Matt Minkovitch, executive director of The Road Home.

The second program, REACH (Recovery, Engagement, Assessment, Career and Housing), will serve approximately 225 formerly incarcerated adult males who are at high risk for additional criminal charges. Data show that 74 percent of men at high risk for re-offending return to the criminal justice system within four years of their release. The REACH program will provide participants with behavioral health treatment (including substance use disorder treatment), housing and case management services with the goal of lowering the rate of recidivism, helping them recover stable lives and reducing costs to taxpayers.

VETERAN SUPPORT

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

Six Utah veterans will have the opportunity to participate in the R&R Program offered by the U’s National Center for Veterans Studies thanks to a grassroots charitable organization.

Craig Bryan, director of the National Center for Veterans Studies, receives donation from 100 Women Who Care Salt Lake City.

The Salt Lake City chapter of 100 Women Who Care raised approximately $14,000 at its December meeting and voted to donate it to the center.

“We love anything that supports families and helps our veterans,” said Lisa Evans, chapter founder. “This is the kind of program we look for, one that makes a difference in an individual’s life.”

The center, located within the College for Social and Behavioral Science, is focused on research, education, outreach and advocacy that helps improve the lives of veterans. The center leads the nation in suicide prevention and PTSD research and treatment. The center has developed and tested the only scientifically supported methods to prevent suicidal behavior among veterans, resulting in a reduction in such behavior of up to 75 percent compared to other treatments.

Craig J. Bryan, a clinical psychologist and associate professor in the Department of Psychology, is the center’s executive director.

“Dr. Bryan has such a great reputation and so many people are already donating their services and funds, we knew our money would be well used,” Evans said.

Evans started 100 Women Who Care Salt Lake City in 2015. The chapter meets quarterly to select one of three nominated nonprofits to support with a $100 donation from each of its 140 members.

The nominations are made by members, who focus on opportunities to make a direct impact on the people served by local nonprofits. Beneficiaries of its “rapid response” donations have included a refugee boy scout troop, Harvest of Hope, the Utah Independent Living Center and The Other Side Academy. Progrexion, a credit report repair company, donates $100 to the two runners-up each quarter.

Anastasia Najarian, outreach manager for the National Center for Veterans Studies, is a member of 100 Women Who Care Salt Lake City and nominated the R&R Program.

The program provides an intensive two-week treatment that combines individual cognitive processing therapy, group therapy and recreational therapy for service members and veterans with PTSD.

“The funds will be used for direct care to the veterans,” Najarian said.

The National Ability Center in Park City, which partners with the center to provide the R&R Program, has agreed to cover part of the cost of any veterans who attend. Bryan also is donating his services.

SUIT UP

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

U President David P. Pershing had just one adamant request when he met with Trapper Roderick to get fitted for a new suit: It could not be blue.

PHOTO CREDIT: University of Utah

Lassonde student, Trapper Roderick, fits President David W. Pershing for a custom suit in Pershing’s office at the University of Utah.

That aside, Pershing was open to whatever recommendations Roderick, a U senior and owner of True Gentleman Supply Co., suggested—from thread color and fabric pattern to lapel style and pocket positioning.

Pershing is among numerous high-profile clients, ranging from developers and bankers to religious leaders and professional athletes, to get a tailored suit from Roderick’s company. Roderick considers businessman Kem C. Gardner one of his favorite clients and Scott Anderson, CEO of Zions Bank, has become a mentor, he said.

No one is more surprised by his career as a haberdasher, perhaps, than Roderick himself.

“I always thought I would be a home builder, developer or architect,” Roderick said. “People are usually pretty shocked when they found out that I’m in this line of work. My favorite thing is I get to meet lots of amazing people and build those relationships.”

What Roderick means is he is not just selling suits, but a personalized experience that will lead clients from one suit to the next over a lifetime and maybe to even seek his advice on what to wear to that special black-tie event.

It’s working: Just three years after launching True Gentleman Supply Co., Roderick says he is on-track to surpass $1 million in sales.

A better suit

Roderick’s interest in suit-making was born out of frustration. He wanted a custom suit and didn’t like the “old-man style” offerings he found.

“I wanted something more fun and I felt I should be able to choose the details,” Roderick said.

So Roderick made the suit he envisioned himself. Soon, friends began requesting suits as well as style advice. Roderick discovered he had a flair for fashion design and a passion for helping men looked their best.

As Roderick began forming a business plan, he shifted academic focus to entrepreneurship. He received mentoring through the Innovation Scholar program and a $6,000 grant from the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute’s Get Seeded program that helped him launch True Gentleman Supply Co.

Roderick also credits entrepreneurship classes he took from Barclay Burns and Kim Power Stilston with being crucial to his success.

“They taught me it was normal for it to be hard,” Roderick said. “When I had road blocks, they offered their advice and they genuinely cared without the need to personally profit from it. They were always there for me as friends, mentors and teachers. They opened my eyes to possibilities and they were optimistic, like I am. More than anything, they were there for me when I made mistakes and had to learn the hard way.”

They also provided Roderick with the opportunity to share his experiences with their classes, which “tailored me to be a good speaker and to take criticism from my peers,” he said. “The students often asked me hard questions that I hadn’t thought of and, because of that, I was constantly pivoting and modifying my business plan and structure.”

The Lassonde Institute has launched more than 325 startups since its creation in 2001; each year, there are a handful of clothing companies that make a run at success. Among those currently incubating at the U are Evok Clothing Collective and Girl Gang.

“Trapper is a very hard-working entrepreneur like many of the students involved with the Lassonde Institute,” said Troy D’Ambrosio, the institute’s executive director. “We work with thousands of students from every academic level and background to invent new products, start companies and learn by doing. Some take what they learn to become better employees and executives. Others, like Trapper, are able to create a sustainable company.”

Handcrafted, hard work

True Gentleman’s focus on hand-crafted, custom tailoring distinguishes it from other clothing companies. As he was getting started, Roderick spoke with “anyone and everyone” he could who had had a suit made or done business overseas. That helped Roderick zero in on a particular garment factory in Thailand that now makes his suits. True Gentleman uses high-end fabrics made in Italy, England and Australia, including brands Dormeuil and Zegna. In addition to custom suits, the company offers shirts and a few accessories. Cost for a custom suit starts at $1,200; each suit takes about five and a half weeks (longer during busy seasons) from measurement to delivery.

Roderick expects to graduate this spring with a degree in communications and an entrepreneurship certificate. He’ll then be able to turn full attention to his fledgling company.

True Gentleman currently employs three people and builds clientele through face-to-face meetings and word-of-mouth. Roderick’s goal is to have a few flagship stores—including one in Salt Lake that combines a clothing store with a barbershop. For now, when a client requests a custom suit, Roderick is the one who shows up to help make design decisions, take measurements and do the final fitting.

“I never expected this to take off,” he said, “but I’ve had a lot of help from the Lassonde Institute and it has turned into a really fun business.”

JUMP, MOVE, DANCE

The University of Utah Tanner Dance Program is now accepting new students for the spring 2017 semester. The program offers creative dance, ballet, hip-hop and visual arts classes in the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts and Education Complex. Creative dance classes are also held for elementary school-age students at off-campus sites in Bountiful, Brigham City, Park City, Ogden, Sandy and South Jordan thanks to partnerships with community centers, schools and U satellite campuses. University employees receive 15 percent off class tuition with their UCard by registering over the phone or in person.

Tanner Dance classes focus on the development of the whole child. Dancers develop creative dance technique through traditional modern and ballet exercises. In addition, they exercise their creativity and imagination as they explore the elements of dance through age appropriate movement. Dancers are given opportunities to improvise, engage in creative problem-solving and grow in cognitive, social and emotional ways as they interact in each class.

“Tanner Dance honors the longstanding commitment to teaching dance as well as creating imaginative, worthwhile human beings,” said Joni Wilson, studio program director. “Dancers explore many aspects including the technical elements of dance alongside creative and aesthetic training.”

Ballet and hip-hop classes give dancers further technical training while helping them maintain a love of dance. All creative dance classes have live accompaniment by experienced and engaging musicians to expose dancers to a variety of musical genres. Kindergarten and older classes participate in a performance in May at Kingsbury Hall as part of the annual spring Tanner Dance Studio Show.

Tanner Dance also offers a series of Dancers with Disabilities classes for students ages three and up who have physical and/or cognitive disabilities. The tuition for these classes is subsidized by various private and government funding sources and students can also pay for tuition through the Department of Services for People with Disabilities funding allocations. These classes include appropriate technique exercises for the whole body and dancers explore shape, space, rhythm and movement quality among a supportive community of teachers, volunteers and friends.

Adults may take a beginning/intermediate modern dance class set to live music on Tuesday nights and gain a WellU credit. This class is taught by a former professional dancer and provides energizing cardio movement appropriate for a variety of ages and ability levels. All classes begin on Tuesday, Jan. 3 and run until Saturday, April 28, with a week off at the end of March. Students can learn more about classes and register online at tannerdance.utah.edu, by calling 801-581-7374 or by visiting the Tanner Dance side of the Beverley Taylor Sorenson Arts and Education Complex,1721 Campus Center Drive.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Nominations needed for the Distinguished Faculty Service Award
University College Advising changing its name to Academic Advising Center
Spring course materials, made to order
Help a student in need
Report suspected fraud or abuse


NOMINATIONS NEEDED FOR THE DISTINGUISHED FACULTY SERVICE AWARD

Bennion Center Director Dean McGovern and law professor Jensie Anderson, 2016 Distinguished Faculty Service Award winner.

It’s a new year but time is running out to nominate a faculty member for the Bennion Center’s Distinguished Faculty Service Award. The deadline is Jan. 9, 2017. This award honors a faculty member who has demonstrated a commitment to the campus-community connection through a life of active, unpaid community service and the integration of service with research and teaching. Faculty service must be based on a long-term commitment to making a positive difference on the campus and in the community, and to the educational value gained by students through community work, beyond the traditional roles of faculty. The Bennion Center will make a gift of $1,000 in honor of the award recipient to a nonprofit or charitable organization of the winner’s choice.

For nomination instructions and selection criteria click here.

The winner will be notified by March 1, 2017.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE ADVISING CHANGING ITS NAME TO ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER

University College Advising is changing its name to better reflect what it does for students. It will be called the Academic Advising Center. Is will still provide the same helpful advising services to students, including:
  • General advising (General Education, policies, resource referral etc.)
  • Major exploration
  • Preprofessional advising (premed, predental, prelaw, etc.)
  • Transfer advising
  • Advising for academic success
  • Non-traditional student advising

Find out more here.


SPRING COURSE MATERIALS, MADE TO ORDER

Ensure that your students come prepared next semester by ordering your Spring Semester course materials from University Print & Mail Services. Do yourself and your students a favor by checking this task off of your list!

In partnership with the University Campus Store, Print & Mail Services offers a variety of course material options and services to help you customize your course instruction. This personalized service allows you to optimize your educational content while effectively managing costs.

Visit Print & Mail Services and click on Course Packets to find information on copyright clearance, royalty collection and accounting, distribution through the Campus Store and in-class sales. Order forms and printing and binding options are also available on the site, as are easy re-order options.

For additional assistance in submitting your course materials request, please contact Steve Beck at 801-581-5779, or Dave Nelson at 801-581-8321.


HELP A STUDENT IN NEED

The Office for Equity and Diversity is eager to launch its first-ever Diversity Student Emergency Fund. The fund is a one-time grant providing financial support to students facing a crisis or unexpected expenses, such as an accident, illness, a death of a family

member, fire damage or need for temporary housing. To maximize resources, create a network and strengthen partnerships, these funds are a collaborative effort with various student services across campus. Pools of funding and resources will help students navigate long-term financial goals. Now you can be a part of the network. Your donation will get students back on their feet, so they can continue to pursue their college career.

To contribute, click here.


DO THE RIGHT THING – REPORT SUSPECTED FRAUD OR ABUSE

ethics-graphic
The university is committed to the highest standards of ethical conduct and encourages employees and others to report any dishonest or improper act that violates the law, wastes money, or endangers public health or safety. Employees are encouraged to report suspected improprieties to their supervisor or to a higher authority if the supervisor is involved. Also, the University has an ongoing contract with EthicsPoint, a private company, to administer an ethics and compliance hotline: 888-206-6025 or online at EthicsPoint. This service ensures confidentiality and provides 24/7 availability.

Hotline reports are regularly investigated, and often assist university leaders to halt improper behavior, address policy violations and resolve other problems. Past reports have been instrumental in correcting issues such as misuse of university resources and unauthorized hiring of relatives.

If you suspect or know of fraud or abuse, report it to management. If you feel unable to communicate your concerns directly to management or another appropriate university department, use the hotline. Provide details—names, dates, times, amounts, circumstances, witnesses, etc. You can even check back and respond to questions from the person investigating your report without divulging your identity.

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Nominations needed for the Distinguished Faculty Service Award
University College Advising changing its name to Academic Advising Center
Help a student in need


NOMINATIONS NEEDED FOR THE DISTINGUISHED FACULTY SERVICE AWARD

Bennion Center Director Dean McGovern and law professor Jensie Anderson, 2016 Distinguished Faculty Service Award winner.

It’s a new year but time is running out to nominate a faculty member for the Bennion Center’s Distinguished Faculty Service Award. The deadline is Jan. 9, 2017. This award honors a faculty member who has demonstrated a commitment to the campus-community connection through a life of active, unpaid community service and the integration of service with research and teaching. Faculty service must be based on a long-term commitment to making a positive difference on the campus and in the community, and to the educational value gained by students through community work, beyond the traditional roles of faculty. The Bennion Center will make a gift of $1,000 in honor of the award recipient to a nonprofit or charitable organization of the winner’s choice.

For nomination instructions and selection criteria click here.

The winner will be notified by March 1, 2017.


UNIVERSITY COLLEGE ADVISING CHANGING ITS NAME TO ACADEMIC ADVISING CENTER

University College Advising is changing its name to better reflect what it does for students. It will be called the Academic Advising Center. Is will still provide the same helpful advising services to students, including:
  • General advising (General Education, policies, resource referral etc.)
  • Major exploration
  • Preprofessional advising (premed, predental, prelaw, etc.)
  • Transfer advising
  • Advising for academic success
  • Non-traditional student advising

Find out more here.


HELP A STUDENT IN NEED

The Office for Equity and Diversity is eager to launch its first-ever Diversity Student Emergency Fund. The fund is a one-time grant providing financial support to students facing a crisis or unexpected expenses, such as an accident, illness, a death of a family

member, fire damage or need for temporary housing. To maximize resources, create a network and strengthen partnerships, these funds are a collaborative effort with various student services across campus. Pools of funding and resources will help students navigate long-term financial goals. Now you can be a part of the network. Your donation will get students back on their feet, so they can continue to pursue their college career.

To contribute, click here.

Campus Events

FREE YOGA FROM JANUARY-APRIL 2017
Mondays | 5:15 p.m.
Wednesdays | 12:05 p.m. (Begins Feb. 1)
Thursdays | 7:05 a.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library, Garden Level

Join us for free 50 minute yoga sessions from January-April 2017 on Mondays, *Wednesdays (begins on Feb. 1) and Thursdays, on the Garden Level, Eccles Health Sciences Library. Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events. Please bring your own mat. If you forget your mat, we have three mats available for check out at the front desk. Please send us feedback here.


SCIENTIST IN THE SPOTLIGHT: RIVER RATS AND UTAH PLANTS
Friday, Jan. 6, 2017 | 2-4 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah

Join scientists each 1st and 3rd Friday in the Museum’s Naturalist Lab, as they share interesting research and community topics in an open, informal setting. For a detailed schedule and more information, click here.

Free to NHMU members, U faculty, staff and students with current UCard.

Join Michelle Knoll, Assistant Curator of Archaeology at NHMU as she talks about archaeological artifacts recovered by the University of Utah just prior to construction of the Glen Canyon Dam (1956-1963), one of the largest salvage projects in the country.

Lila Leatherman, graduate fellow from Oregon State University and former research assistant at NHMU’s Garret Herbarium will also talk about whether native Utah plants are flowering earlier as a result of climate change.

Click here to read more.


AUGUST WILSON’S ‘FENCES’
Friday, Jan. 6-Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017
Simmons Pioneer Memorial Theatre

Pioneer Theatre Company presents Fences, the critically renowned play by August Wilson. The timeless drama about fathers and sons runs Jan. 6-21, 2017.
Fences tells the story of Troy Maxson, a former star of the Negro baseball league, now a garbage man in 1950s Pittsburgh. Troy’s determined bitterness over his exclusion from the all-white major leagues causes conflict within his family as his son Cory aims to pursue his own dreams to play ball with a college football scholarship. Winner of the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, August Wilson’s play has been popular with critics and audiences alike since its premiere in 1983.

The professional Equity cast of six is joined by a local child actor.

$25-$44 in advance, and $5 more when purchased on the day of the show.

Kids in grades K-12 are half-price on Mondays and Tuesdays. Click here to purchase tickets.


YELLOW LEAVES, SHAKESPEARE AND HIS TIMES: AN EXHIBITION
Now through Friday, Jan. 6, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 4

yellowleavesubnwlogo
In commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, the J. Willard Marriott Library presents an exhibition exploring his life and work. Centered upon selections from the First Folio (1623) and other historical editions of his poetry and plays, the exhibit examines the historical context of Shakespeare’s writing, posthumous attempts at uncovering his biography, the influences upon his plays and portrayals of renowned performances.


MUSE LUNCHTIME LECTURE
Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017 | 12:15-1:15 p.m.
Sterling Sill Center, Large conference room

On the first Thursday of each month during the academic year, MUSE invites an inspiring University of Utah faculty member to present a Lunchtime Lecture in relation to our 2016-17 theme of Optimism. Join us in the Sill Center at noon for FREE LUNCH and an hour of unique perspectives on the theme.

Our Lunchtime Lectures provide great opportunities for you to meet students with similar interests and to connect with some of the most prominent professors from all different colleges and departments across campus.


MLK WEEK CELEBRATION
Saturday, Jan. 14-Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017
Various locations

At the University of Utah, we celebrate the educational access and opportunities that Dr. King’s legacy has provided in the United States. MLK week has become a platform to engage students, faculty, staff and community members in critical conversations around contemporary civil rights issues and race in America. This year’s MLK Celebration will be held Jan. 14-21, 2017, and we invite you to participate in our many events we will be hosting throughout campus.

For a list of events, visit diversity.utah.edu/mlk.


A CONVERSATION WITH ARTIST ACTIVISTS
Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017 | 7:30 p.m.
Kingsbury Hall

As part of the University of Utah’s David P. Gardner Lecture in the Humanities and Fine Arts, the College of Fine Arts is bringing world-renowned artists Bill T. Jones, Taylor Mac and Niegel Smith to campus for a free and public lecture on Jan.17, 2017 at 7:30 p.m. in Kingsbury Hall (free but tickets required).

The conversation, facilitated by KUER RadioWest’s Doug Fabrizio, will be centered around the intersection of art and activism, as these artists have, in their own ways, used their art to catalyze and inform conversations about issues including race, AIDS, gender identity, sexuality, and others.

“These artists exemplify the ways in which the arts manifest and reflect social change,” said Raymond Tymas-Jones, associate vice president for the arts and dean of the College of Fine Arts. “We are so fortunate to go beyond the stage with them and hear what inspires and shapes their work that we so admire.”


GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIAL HOUR
Thursday, Jan. 19, 2017 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Marriott Library Graduate Reading Room, Level 1

Graduate students, Come visit with graduate students from other disciplines, check out the Graduate Student Reading Room, learn about some services the library offers just for grad students, and meet some of the librarians available to help you with your teaching and research.


SCIENTIST IN THE SPOTLIGHT: VULTURES
Friday, Jan. 20, 2017 | 2-4 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah

Join scientists each first and third Friday in the museum’s Naturalist Lab, as they share interesting research and community topics in an open, informal setting. For a detailed schedule and more information, go here.

Free to NHMU members, U of U faculty, staff and students with current UCard.

Join Evan Buechley, a conservation biologist to learn why vultures are the most endangered group of birds in the world and the vital role they play in their ecosystems.

For more details, click here.


LARRY GERLACH: FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY LECTURE
Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017, 3–4 p.m.
Gould Auditorium, Marriott Library

Larry Gerlach is professor emeritus of history at the University of Utah. His numerous books and articles include Blazing Crosses in Zion: The Ku Klux Klan in Utah and The Men in Blue: Conversations With Umpires. He will be discussing Alma Richards: Olympian, which was published through the University of Utah Press here at the J. Willard Marriott Library.


LIVE MUSEUM THEATER
Through April 15, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah

Don’t miss live theater performances delighting Museum audiences almost daily. Current productions include: Poison Live! – the true story of how murder helped bring about the science of toxicology, and The Extreme Plants Traveling Sideshow, a fun look at how exotic plants in the rainforest develop life-saving defenses.

Shows are included with regular Museum admission.

Poison Live! is a 12-minute theatrical and multimedia show that tells a dramatic story about the beginnings of toxicology. Check here for scheduled days and times.

Extreme plants traveling show: Step right up and see the world’s most daring, elegant, exotic, and mysterious plants! Experience this high-energy, 20-minute theatrical performance that will entertain and enlighten one and all. Meet the plants and bear witness to their highly evolved defense mechanisms. Seeing is believing folks. Check here for scheduled days and times.


THE POWER OF POISON
Through April 16, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah

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Mystery and intrigue are afoot at NHMU’s new Power of Poison exhibit. Learn more about the role of poison for good and ill in nature, history, myths and legends and real life. Complete with live animals, technical wonders and a touch of live theater, there is something to fascinate the explorer in everyone.

NHMU is the only stop on “The Power of Poison” tour that displays live animals. When visitors step into “Poison in Nature,” they enter the Chocó forest of Columbia where live golden poison arrow frogs peer up from their tanks. These brightly-colored amphibians can fit into your shirt pocket, but they would be a deadly accessory; their skin secretes a substance so toxic that the poison from one frog can kill 10 grown humans.

Purchase tickets here.