ATHLETES GIVING BACK

By Jennifer Jones, communications director, Bennion Community Service Center

University of Utah athletes who make time to serve others were honored Saturday at the Utah vs. Washington game with an award designed to recognize their contributions outside the sports environment.

Ute gymnast Maddy Stover and swimmer Gabriella Hestwood received the 2016 Utah Athletes in Service award during a midfield ceremony Saturday.

Gabby Hestwood, Utah swimming and diving August 26, 2016 in Salt Lake City, UT. (Photo / Steve C. Wilson / University of Utah)

Gabby Hestwood, Utah swimming and diving August 26, 2016 in Salt Lake City, UT. (Photo / Steve C. Wilson / University of Utah)

“The Bennion Center strongly encourages community engagement as an important part of a college

education,” said Dean McGovern, Bennion Center executive director. “These student-athletes serve as role models on and off the field, court or track. We recognize them for giving back to the community in spite of their busy academic and athletic schedules.”

Hestwood volunteers eight to 10 hours per week at University Hospital where she helps transport

patients for X-rays and other tests.

“I enjoy helping people in any way that I can,” she said. “My end goal is to become a doctor, and I think volunteering gives me valuable experience interacting with people.”

U gymnast Maddy Stover.

U gymnast Maddy Stover.

Maddy Stover spent more than 50 hours volunteering last year. She served at the Boys & Girls Club, Primary Children’s Hospital, Ronald McDonald House and the Student Athlete Advisory Committee, as well as volunteering at her church.

“I have learned that everyone has a story, and taking the time to hear that story can impact the way you view your own life and gives you perspective,” said Stover.

Hestwood agreed, “I enjoy engaging in community service because it allows me to take a step back and realize how lucky I am to have the opportunities that I do. If I can make an impact on just one person’s life in the process of volunteering, then I would consider it a huge success.”

Stover said her service has helped her fall in love with the people of Salt Lake City. She said they’re the best fans in the world.

MAKING NEW TRAILS

By Jennifer Jones, communications director, Bennion Community Service Center

“I always considered college, but it is still kind of daunting,” James Nguyen said. A senior majoring in biology, Nguyen is not your typical college student. Born in the U.S., his parents emigrated from Vietnam and had no college experience. After high school, he enlisted in the Air Force and became a medical technician. When his tour was up, he found himself at a crossroads: Re-enlist and make the Air Force a career or go back to school. He chose school. And despite his age and his experience, the process was intimidating.

Tori Bandley, an anthropology and environmental sustainability major, felt the same. “Neither of my parents went to college,” she said. “Navigating the process of getting into college was a little difficult because I had no one to really guide me. Both Bandley and Nguyen recently completed an Alternative Fall Break experience designed specifically for first-generation college students.

sanrafael-10-of-37Offered through the U’s Lowell Bennion Community Service Center, “Identity and Environmental Exploration” is intended to help first-generation students get involved with service and build a relationship with nature through environmental stewardship. The week-long trip consisted of five days of backcountry camping in Utah’s San Rafael Swell, combined with service projects coordinated through the Bureau of Land Management. The $50 cost included food, lodging and transportation. It’s deliberately low to make the experience accessible to more students.

Laura Schwartz, Alternative Breaks coordinator at the Bennion Center, was also the staff partner for this trip. “We spent the week not just learning more about each other but about being first-generation students. It’s one thing to attend a university. It’s another to actually complete your degree.” The trip is intended to help first-generation students understand how they can use volunteer work and the outdoors as tools to help them succeed.

This year the Bennion Center partnered with the U’s Outdoor Adventure department for help with gear and personnel. The group of eight students camped, climbed and cleaned up trail heads. “It’s hard!” Nguyen said. “Going up Pinnacle 1 is like going through school for the first time. You’re just kind of out there with your peers. I think it’s important to have a good support system in place to finish college or get to the top of a canyon. Everybody struggles at some point.”

“I have a crippling fear of heights,” Bandley admitted. “Pinnacle 1 was the hardest thing I have ever done in my entire life. Every activity we did throughout the day we would try and tie it back into our education. That hike was the difficulty and fear (of college), and then you get to the top and the view as just unlike anything I’ve ever seen.”

For Nguyen, the environmental impact was profound. “You just get a sense that these areas should be conserved. We talk about conservation a lot, but until you go out there you can’t get a feel of how important this is.”

“I really enjoyed reflecting daily with the other students about our identities as first-generation students,” Bandley said. “We each had really different experiences even though we were all first gen. I had no idea there was such a strong community of us at the U, so that was a really nice feeling.”

Schwartz hopes all of the students come home with more confidence in their ability to succeed at the U and play an active role in their community. “Having folks there to say, ‘You can do this. I know you can do this,’ makes such a big difference.”

Bandley agreed. “I think it’s 100 percent worth it — meeting people and reflecting on yourself, your education, your goals, and conquering your fears. I think that resembles the light at the end of the tunnel. I think it will all be worth it at the end.”

For more information on alternative breaks, go here.

Construction & Commuter Updates

NEW:

–    The sidewalks surrounding the Huntsman Arena on all sides will be closed off for periods throughout the next two weeks due to renovation on the air tunnels. Work is expected to finish Nov. 9, 2016.

ONGOING:

–    The fence at OSH will expand to the shape it will take for the duration of this school year. An accessible temporary sidewalk will go in between OSH and LNCO on the south west side of Central Campus Drive. The yellow, slightly thicker fence lines on the map below indicate areas with a covered walkway.

osh-pedestrian-paths-copy

–    The Film and Media Arts Building is undergoing roof replacements and is expected to be completed Nov. 14, 2016.

–   Salt Lake City begins construction of university to downtown bikeway. This will be completed in mid-November. For more information, go here.

–    The sidewalk around the HPER West as well as the southern exits of the building will be closed due to noise and dust disturbance as trenching and earthwork will be taking place in this area for high temperature water line updates. This project will be completed Nov. 30, 2016.

–    Work continues to complete the electric bus route that will run north/south, connecting the Business Loop to the loop near the Union. The sidewalk between Tanner Humanities and LNCO (noted as Phase 2 in the image below) will be closed until the end of fall semester to complete the roadway for the bus. As an alternative, pedestrians should take the pathway through the LNCO plaza between OSH and LNCO immediately to the west of this path.
bus-route-2

–    The east side of the Business Loop is under construction. Tanner Dance is accessible from the west end of the loop and both entrances to the Central Parking Garage are open. A portion of the loop on the east side is fenced off to vehicle and pedestrian traffic. Parking lot 12 (west of the main garage) remains open. This is expected to be completed on Nov. 30, 2016.

–    The Alumni House is under renovation. Expect noise and dust disturbance impacting some pedestrian paths. Expected to be complete August 2017.

–    The Huntsman Cancer Institute is under renovation to add additional facilities and research spaces. The project is scheduled for completion in April 2017.

See the construction impact map below.

 

LET’S GET POLITICAL

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications 

From GOP infighting to the WikiLeaks email hacks and the rise of a viable third-party presidential candidate in Utah, there has been no shortage of political surprises this fall—which has provided perfect timing for the launch of “The Hinckley Report.”

KUED launched the weekly half-hour public affairs series in partnership with the Hinckley Institute of Politics on Sept. 30. “The Hinckley Report” is modeled after “Washington Week” on PBS, which features a roundtable of journalists discussing the issues of the week. Its goal: elevate the dialogue surrounding pressing political issues and how they relate to Utah.

The show, which airs on Fridays at 7:30 p.m., has provided a provocative take on local and national events from a rotating roster of Utah journalists and political observers. Guests have included Max Roth of Fox 13 News, Robert Gehrke of The Salt Lake Tribune, Heidi Hatch of KUTV-2 News, political commentator Frank Pignanelli, Emily Clark of KTVX ABC4, former state Sen. Steve Urquhart and Lisa Riley Roche of the Deseret News.

“We have been thrilled with the response to the show,” said host Jason Perry, director of the Hinckley Institute and the U’s vice president for government relations. “We’ve been particularly blown away by our fantastic guests. Their knowledge, analysis and wit have made each show fun and compelling.”

KUED, he said, has been a wonderful partner. “Their behind-the-scenes work elevates each show,” Perry said.

Lisa D. Olken, KUED director of content, said ratings have doubled since the debut.

“My expectations have been surpassed,” Olken said. “‘The Hinckley Report’ is one month old and it’s really the only news and political series in this market that is thought provoking, informative, humorous and highly entertaining—and that’s a great combination to have. I think it’s not only about the knowledge and experience of the host but also the street cred of the guests—those who bring their facts, opinions and ‘aha’ moments to the table. There’s a great deal of banter and back and forth, friendly debating that goes on and so it does feel like we are elevating the discourse and dialogue in Utah.”

A yet-to-be announced all-star guest panel will dissect election results and plans are in the works for a special show focused on women in politics. From January to April, “The Hinckley Report” will focus on the Utah Legislature as well as the new Congress and presidential administration.

“I’m excited about the potential for the water cooler conversations that I hope we spark in the community,” Olken said. “Utah is at the epicenter of national politics right now and I’m thrilled that KUED and ‘The Hinckley Report’ are a playing an important role.”

“The Hinckley Report” airs on Fridays at 7:30 p.m. on KUED Channel 7. Past episodes and web extras also are available at kued.org/hinckleyreport.

A Healthier U

10 PRINCIPLES OF INTUITIVE EATING

What does it mean to be an intuitive eater? An intuitive eater listens to her body, eating when she’s hungry and stopping once she’s satisfied. An intuitive eater is also a mindful eater savoring food, setting aside time to eat and enjoying the experience.

  1. Reject the diet mentality: Quick fix diets don’t work for sustainable weight loss. If you have lost weight on a fad diet and gained it back—you’re not alone. Hoping that you can “diet” your way to better health is destructive to a goal of becoming an intuitive eater.
  2. Honor your hunger: Supply your body with adequate fuel for its biological needs. Hunger is a strong primal drive—if you ignore it for long, it’s extremely difficult to eat in moderation. Learning to honor your hunger sets the stage for building a healthy relationship with food.
  3. Make peace with food: Give yourself permission to eat all kinds of foods. When some foods are “forbidden,” it can lead to feelings of deprivation that build into uncontrollable cravings and overeating.
  4. Challenge the food police: Disrupt the thoughts in your head that declare you’re “good” for restricting calories or “bad” because you ate a cookie. These types of thoughts are neither true, nor helpful in developing intuitive eating practices.
  5. Respect your fullness: Practice awareness of the body signals that tell you that you are no longer hungry. Check in with yourself in the middle of a meal to ask yourself if you are feeling full.
  6. Discover the satisfaction factor: Eating slowly and savoring your food increases the pleasure and satisfaction that can be found in the eating experience. By providing an enjoyable eating experience for yourself, you will find that it takes less food to decide you’ve had enough.
  7. Honor your feelings without using food: Food won’t fix anxiety, loneliness, boredom or anger. Eating for an emotional hunger will only make you feel worse in the long run. Find ways to deal with these issues without using food.
  8. Respect your body: Your body is amazing. Begin to focus on what your body can do rather than what it looks like. It’s hard to reject the diet mentality if you are unrealistic and overly critical about your body shape.
  9. ExerciseFeel the difference: Our bodies were made to move. Regular physical activity can decrease stress, improve sleep quality and increase energy. When you shift your focus to how it feels to move your body, rather than the calorie burning effect of exercise, being active becomes a gift instead of a chore.
  10. Honor your healthGentle nutrition: You don’t have to eat a “perfect diet” to be healthy. Make food choices that honor your health and taste buds while making you feel well.

Want to learn more about how to integrate intuitive eating into your life?  As part of the University of Utah wellness program, WellU, benefits eligible employees can take advantage of a no-cost one-on-one meeting with a registered dietitian. Make your appointment today.

STAYING SAFE ON HALLOWEEN

With ghosts, ghouls and goblins out and about visiting each house in hopes of getting some treats, dangers can lurk when you least expect it. By being safe on a dark night, your kiddos will be happier and will possibly get more candy. We’ve compiled a list of simple actions you can do to bring peace of mind to you and help you avoid a real scare.

halloween

 

HealthFeed

HALLOWEEN CONTACT LENSES: SCARIER THAN THEY LOOK

vampire-eye

Halloween is a spooky time of year, and people go to great lengths to perfect their costumes. However, when it comes disguising your eyes with “fashion,” or “cosmetic” contact lenses the results can be downright scary. Contact lenses of any type are medical devices that should not be purchased without a doctor’s prescription. Without a prescription you are risking serious harm to your eyes.

“The lenses need to fit correctly on your cornea (the clear part of your eye), otherwise, they can be dangerous,” says David Meyer, OD, Director of Contact Lens Services at Moran Eye Center. “Dangers include corneal ulcers, scratches, inflammation, bacterial infections, and in some cases even blindness.”

It is actually illegal to buy contact lenses without a prescription (even if you don’t need any vision correction), so the vendors who are selling cosmetic lenses as a type of accessory or jewelry are, in fact, breaking the law. The Food and Drug Administration actually has a website where you can report the illegal selling of these lenses. While the sellers are the law breakers, their customers may end up paying the price with damaged eyes.

Even with a prescription, fashion contact lenses come with risks. Any time you place something in your eye you are risking infection, or injury. “As a general rule, I discourage their use all together,” says Meyer. “Even if a patient really wants them and is willing to get a proper fitting and accurate prescription I am only okay with them being worn temporarily.”

When wearing any contact lenses, be sure to follow care and cleaning instructions thoroughly. Make sure they are disinfected before placing them in your eye, and make sure you are placing them in your eye with clean hands. If the lenses come out of your eyes be sure to clean them before putting them back in. Be sure to only clean your lenses with solution designed for this purpose. Cleaning them with water – or in your mouth – could lead to big problems.

If your eyes start burning or itching while wearing your lenses, take them out immediately. See your eye doctor if you notice any pain, blurry vision, or discharge. After all, you don’t want one night in costume to turn into a lifelong horror.

For more expert health news and information, visit healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed.

HUMANS OF THE U: OCTOBER 2016

josh-grant

“I played basketball for nine years, one in the NBA and eight in Europe; the University of Utah gave me that opportunity. It gave me an education and made it possible for me to play basketball professionally.

When I came back to Salt Lake for our 100-year basketball reunion in 2008, I sat on the floor of the Huntsman Center and saw hundreds of other basketball players. It was then that I had an epiphany that it is not about what the university owes me, but what I owe the university. It was there I realized I needed to do something to get more involved with the U. I thought since I don’t have the money to give back, I need to do something and that’s what encouraged me to return to work here.

I started in development doing fundraising for the entire campus. Then later, my wife and I had just had triplets and we were at the hospital when the College of Engineering called and said a development opportunity had just opened up and wondered if I would be interested in applying.

Now, I really enjoy going around and bragging about the U, telling people how great their university is.”

— Josh Grant, former Ute basketball star and current director of major gifts for the College of Engineering

“When I was 15, I told my parents I was gay, and was thrown out of the house. I dropped out of high school, and migrated to the West Coast. In my 30s, my partner of 14 years died. I went off the deep end. I started mental health therapy, which was one of the best things that ever happened to me.

At 38, I took my first college course. I was studying psychology and attended a grad school night for majors where I first heard about clinical social work. I decided to get my MSW.

In my work, I saw adults within the LGBTQ community marginalized because of their age and saw how policies were impacting people’s mental health. I became part of a research team looking at the health and well-being of LGBT adults, aged 50 and older. I got my Ph.D. to help my research be recognized as legitimate.

While my research is important to me, teachers were the positive influences in my life early on. They said or did something that internally shifted me and as a teacher now, I’m hoping to pass that on.”

— Charles Pitre Hoy-Ellis, assistant professor, College of Social Work

“My life was stuck in substance use disorder, which led to crime, which led to jail and prison. I thought addiction was going to be part of me for the rest of my life.

In 2011, I was sent back to prison on a parole violation and went into the Con-Quest treatment program. On my first night there, I went to a 12 Steps meeting and I surrendered. I started to make huge changes. I finally got it. In one meeting a speaker shared his story about going to prison, getting humble, working in a treatment center and going to college to be a counselor. I was like, ‘If that dude can do it, I can do it.’

I want to be an agent of change. Everyone’s awareness needs to be raised about addiction and the stigma that comes into play when people make mistakes. People can heal, but we’ve got to let them heal.”

— Justin Hughes, senior in Social Work, events coordinator for Recover at the U, president Bachelor of Social Work Student Association, chapter leader for Young People in Recovery

Continue reading

Safe & Sound

THANK YOU: EMPLOYEE APPRECIATION DAY

groupThe Department of Occupational and Environmental Health and Safety would like to thank all the employees who visited our booth on Employee Appreciation Day. As well as congratulate all of our raffle winners.

We hope everyone had a wonderful time as well and learned about the training courses and services that OEHS provides for the university, including:

 

  • Chemical Safety
  • General Safety
  • Fire Safety
  • Lab Closure and Relocation
  • Hazardous Materials
  • Biosafety
  • Lab Management System
  • Lab Signage
  • Ergonomics
  • Environmental Compliance
  • Indoor Air Quality Safety Training

 

 

 

branding-logo

Highlighted Events

 

THE POWER OF POISON
Through April 16, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah


goldendartfrog_amnh_t-grant-cropped
Mystery and intrigue are afoot at NHMU’s new Power of Poison exhibit. Learn more about the role of poison for good and ill in nature, history, myths and legends and real life. Complete with live animals, technical wonders and a touch of live theater, there is something to fascinate the explorer in everyone.

NHMU is the only stop on “The Power of Poison” tour that displays live animals. When visitors step into “Poison in Nature,” they enter the Chocó forest of Columbia where live golden poison arrow frogs peer up from their tanks. These brightly-colored amphibians can fit into your shirt pocket, but they would be a deadly accessory; their skin secretes a substance so toxic that the poison from one frog can kill 10 grown humans.

Purchase tickets here.


INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
Monday, Oct. 31, 2016 | 12-1 p.m.
Building 73, Hinckley Caucus Room


humanitarian-assistance
International Humanitarian Assistance and American Foreign Policy

Ron Mortensen, United States Agency for International Development, Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA).


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, Oct. 31, 2016 | 3 p.m.
Carolyn Tanner Irish Humanities Building (CTIHB), Room 109


Academic-Senate

The next Academic Senate meeting will be held on Monday, Oct. 31 at 3 p.m. in 109 CTIHB. Meetings are open to the public. Agenda items for the upcoming meeting include a new interim rule on international travel for faculty and staff and the libraries’ deselection project.


 

ANARCHIST WOMEN AND THE POLITICS OF WALKING
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 |1-3 p.m.
College of Law, Room 6500, Flynn Faculty Workshop Room


anarchist-women-walking
The Neal A. Maxwell Lecture Series in Political Theory and Contemporary Politics presents, “Anarchist Women and the Politics of Walking” featuring guest speaker Kathy Ferguson from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. Commentary provided by Lori Marso (Union College) and Annie Menzel (Vassar College).


26TH ANNUAL SKI AFFAIR
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 | 6 p.m.
Little America Hotel

ski-affair
The University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library will honor two legacies that helped make Utah a world-class winter sport and recreation destination at the 26th annual Ski Affair, Nov. 1 at 6 p.m. at Little America Hotel. The Utah Olympic Legacy Foundation will receive the library’s History-Maker Award for maintaining three Olympic legacy venues, Utah Olympic Park in Park City, Utah Olympic Oval in Kearns and Soldier Hollow Nordic Center in Midway. Gary DeSeelhorst will receive the S.J. Quinney Award for his contribution to winter sports in the region. He led Solitude Ski Resort from 1977 until 2015 when he sold it to an affiliate of the Deer Valley Resort Company. Along with his wife Betsy and their sons, he nurtured Solitude through its most formative years and made the European-style ski village a premier destination resort.

The 2016 Ski Affair will include a reception and silent auction, followed by a buffet dinner and the recognition of the honorees. Admission tickets are $75 per person, $1,500 for a reserved table of 10 and can be made here or by calling 801-581-3421 or emailing judy.jarrow@utah.edu. The reservation deadline is Oct. 21. Proceeds will further development of the Utah Ski Archives


THAT’S JUST THE CLOTHES TALKING: WHAT YOU WEAR COMMUNICATES MORE THAN TO YOU THINK
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 | 7 p.m.
Little America Hotel, Olympus Room


carla-v-lloyd
Department of Communication’s annual Town & Gown event will feature Carla V. Lloyd, Ph.D., emeritus professor from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University. She is the 2016-’17 Parry D. Sorensen Distinguished Lecturer.

Lloyd will present a short lecture titled, “That’s Just the Clothes Talking:  What You Wear Communicates More than You Think.”
This talk will explore the communication effect of how people dress, including an exploration of personal impression management, politics of appearance, media’s ideal imagery and clothing.

A reception with food and drinks will follow the talk. This event is free and open to anyone.

Please join us.


WILDERNESS MEDICINE IN THE ALPS
Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016 | 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Union Den

wilderness-medicine

This two-week program and six-day adventure will give students the opportunity to get to know some of the most beautiful spots in the Alps – and all by foot! The program will begin with five days of instruction in Chamonix. After one day sightseeing above the Mont Blanc valley, students will start a five day hut-to-hut trek around the highest mountain in Europe, the Mont Blanc.

Students will become familiar with the most common backcountry problems and practice evaluating, treating and evacuating injured persons in wilderness settings.


STREET SCENES: IMAGINING COSMPOLITAN LONDON
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Language & Communications Building, LNCO 3870


cosmopolitan-london
Come learn about the Summer 2017 Street Scenes: Imagining Cosmopolitan London program. Walking through the streets of London, one experiences a striking range of cultures and subcultures, often within the same neighborhood.

Focusing on representations of urban spaces and street life, this course will consider how writers, artists and filmmakers since the end of the 18th century have imagined just this experience.


FIFTH ANNUAL WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 | 7-10 p.m.
Fort Douglas Post Theater (245 S. Fort Douglas Blvd.)

wild-scenic-film-festival
Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENVST) is hosting its 5th annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival.  This event builds community while raising funds for ENVST student Scholarships.  Light refreshments will be served as well as a silent auction and a raffle with prizes from national and local sponsors. Cost is $10 for students and $15 for non-students.

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here.


PERFORMING DANCE COMPANY
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 | 5:30 p.m.
Marriott Center for Dance, Hayes Christensen Theatre


performing-dance-co
Join the School of Dance Performing Dance Company for five exciting choreographic pieces of poetic energy, transition, and unexpected possibilities. Guest choreographer Jackie Lopez uses light for a powerful piece on resilience in “Warriors of Light.” Sharee Lane’s “Doorway” takes you through a range of moods and emotions, Daniel Clifton and Satu Hummasti use the same forest for two new and separate dances that start from a similar point and Eric Handman employs rigorous but unpredictable formalism resulting in unstable yet inevitable group dynamics.

Free with the U Artspass (UCard) for University of Utah students
$12 Adults
$8 Students, faculty and seniors

Get your tickets here.


GLASS ART SHOW
Friday, Nov. 4-Sunday, Dec. 18, 2016
Red Butte Garden

glass-art
The Glass Art Guild of Utah returns to Red Butte Garden for another stunning show of kiln work and blown glass. Large and small pieces including garden art, decorative boxes, sculptural works and jewelry pieces will display the brilliant colors of this delightful medium.

Items displayed will be available for sale.

Meet the Artists Reception on Saturday, Nov. 12 from 2-6 p.m.

Visit redbuttegarden.org/glass-art-show for more information.


NOVEMBER FACULTY CLUB SOCIAL
Friday, Nov. 4, 2016 | 5 p.m.
University Park Marriott


november-social-general
Join the Faculty Club “under the big top” for the November social! Street tacos, beer, wine and fun.

JOE HILL LECTURE SERIES, PART 1
Friday, Nov. 4, 2016 | 7-9 p.m.
Marriott Library, Room 1170

joehill_mlib

In November 1915, Joe Hill was killed by a firing squad after being convicted of killing Salt Lake City grocer John Morrison. The execution remains controversial with many aspects of the case still shrouded in mystery. One of Hill’s staunchest defenders was a University of Utah professor named Virginia Snow Stephen. She was the daughter of LDS Church President Lorenzo Snow and worked on many labor related causes. The Salt Lake Tribune’s Jeremy Harmon will discuss local reaction to her role in Hill’s defense and her contention that local police may have been actively intimidating Hill’s supporters to remain silent.


FLORAL SHOW: ORCHIDS
Saturday, Nov. 5-Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016
Red Butte Garden

orchid-show
The Utah Orchid Society will display and sell exotic orchids. Red Butte Garden is the only place you will see this large of an orchid exhibit in Utah.

Free with regular garden admission and free for garden members.

For more information, go here.


EXPECT THE GREAT CONFERENCE
Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016 | 8 a.m.
Union Building lobby

social-media-expect-the-great-2016
Expect the Great is an annual college and career readiness event for Utah’s African American, African and black communities to learn about higher education opportunities, preparing for and applying for college, paying for college and how to be successful in college. Participants will have an opportunity to meet and network with individuals from the community and colleges across the state that can provide information about various support services and opportunities. The event will feature all the major colleges and universities throughout the state. There will also be a career fair for those looking for a new career or to transition.

The event is free, but registration is required.


RWANDA: THE PURSUIT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE, THEN AND NOW
Monday, Nov. 7 | 12 p.m.
Building 73, Hinckley Caucus Room


prosper
Ambassador Pierre-Richard Prosper, who served as a war crimes prosecutor for the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, will speak about his successful prosecution of Jean-Paul Akayesu on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity—including making legal history in prosecuting rape as a war crime. Rape has been listed as an international war crime since 1919, but had never been successfully prosecuted until the 1997 trial. Akayesu, a Hutu and former mayor of a small town in central Rwanda, received a life sentence.

Akayesu’s 14-month trial is the focus of a new documentary, “The Uncondemned,” that spotlights the work of Prosper and co-prosecutor Sara Darehshori and four women who courageously testified. The documentary will debut in Utah on Nov. 18.

The 1994 conflict between the Hutus and Tutsis in Rwanda left more than 800,000 people dead; it is estimated that tens of thousands of women were raped.

Prosper later served as the U.S. ambassador-at-large for war crimes in the George W. Bush administration. He currently lives in Salt Lake City and is a partner at Arent Fox LLP, based in Los Angeles, where he specializes in international government relations and trade, mediation and internal assessments, and investigations on behalf of government entities and companies.

Co-sponsors of the event are the Hinckley Institute of Politics and the S.J. Quinney College of Law.


PRINT APPRECIATION
Friday, Nov. 11, 2016 | 1-9 p.m.
Marriott Library, Book Arts Studio, Level four

printappreciationubn
Come help the Book Arts Program celebrate letterpress printing. With a variety of printing plates and type locked-up on the presses, guest printers (that’s you) can create cards from modular elements overprinted to match individual taste. We invite the public to drop in and print as many cards as time or wallet allow at $5 per card or three cards for $10.


YELLOW LEAVES, SHAKESPEARE AND HIS TIMES: AN EXHIBITION
Now through Friday, Jan. 6, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 4

yellowleavesubnwlogo
In commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, the J. Willard Marriott Library presents an exhibition exploring his life and work.  Centered upon selections from the First Folio (1623) and other historical editions of his poetry and plays, the exhibit examines the historical context of Shakespeare’s writing, posthumous attempts at uncovering his biography, the influences upon his plays, and portrayals of renowned performances.

This exhibition coincides with the visit of a First Folio from the Folger Shakespeare Library, on display at the Salt Lake Public Library from Oct. 8-31, 2016.

Campus Events

GAMES4HEALTH TEAM REGISTRATION
Monday, Oct. 31, 2016 | 8 a.m.-Friday, Feb. 10, 2017, 11:59 p.m.
Register at g4hutah.com


games4health
Games4Health is an annual game design competition for university students around the world. We promote health through games that people love to play. Join the community.

Registration is now open. Let’s create new ways to care for ourselves and each other.

Learn more and register now at g4hutah.com.


THE POWER OF POISON
Through April 16, 2017
Natural History Museum of Utah


goldendartfrog_amnh_t-grant-cropped
Mystery and intrigue are afoot at NHMU’s new Power of Poison exhibit. Learn more about the role of poison for good and ill in nature, history, myths and legends and real life. Complete with live animals, technical wonders and a touch of live theater, there is something to fascinate the explorer in everyone.

NHMU is the only stop on “The Power of Poison” tour that displays live animals. When visitors step into “Poison in Nature,” they enter the Chocó forest of Columbia where live golden poison arrow frogs peer up from their tanks. These brightly-colored amphibians can fit into your shirt pocket, but they would be a deadly accessory; their skin secretes a substance so toxic that the poison from one frog can kill 10 grown humans.

Purchase tickets here.


INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE AND AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY
Monday, Oct. 31, 2016 | 12-1 p.m.
Building 73, Hinckley Caucus Room


humanitarian-assistance
International Humanitarian Assistance and American Foreign Policy

Ron Mortensen, United States Agency for International Development, Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA).


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, Oct. 31, 2016 | 3 p.m.
Carolyn Tanner Irish Humanities Building (CTIHB), Room 109


Academic-Senate

The next Academic Senate meeting will be held on Monday, Oct. 31 at 3 p.m. in 109 CTIHB. Meetings are open to the public. Agenda items for the upcoming meeting include a new interim rule on international travel for faculty and staff and the Libraries’ deselection project.


MEETUP: HALLOWEEN PARTY
Monday, Oct. 31, 2016 | 4-6 p.m.
Lassonde Studios


halloween-party
Join us if you dare for a Halloween scare. There will be treats and sweets and Halloween games that will make you think outside of the pumpkin. Meet new friends while getting creative in team-building activities.

Don’t miss out on the Halloween fun.


ANARCHIST WOMEN AND THE POLITICS OF WALKING
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 |1-3 p.m.
College of Law, Room 6500, Flynn Faculty Workshop Room


anarchist-women-walking
The Neal A. Maxwell Lecture Series in Political Theory and Contemporary Politics presents, “Anarchist Women and the Politics of Walking” featuring guest speaker Kathy Ferguson from the University of Hawai’i at Manoa. Commentary provided by Lori Marso (Union College) and Annie Menzel (Vassar College).


26TH ANNUAL SKI AFFAIR
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 | 6 p.m.
Little America Hotel

ski-affair
The University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library will honor two legacies that helped make Utah a world-class winter sport and recreation destination at the 26th annual Ski Affair, Nov. 1 at 6 p.m. at Little America Hotel. The Utah Olympic Legacy Foundation will receive the library’s History-Maker Award for maintaining three Olympic legacy venues, Utah Olympic Park in Park City, Utah Olympic Oval in Kearns and Soldier Hollow Nordic Center in Midway. Gary DeSeelhorst will receive the S.J. Quinney Award for his contribution to winter sports in the region. He led Solitude Ski Resort from 1977 until 2015 when he sold it to an affiliate of the Deer Valley Resort Company. Along with his wife Betsy and their sons, he nurtured Solitude through its most formative years and made the European-style ski village a premier destination resort.

The 2016 Ski Affair will include a reception and silent auction, followed by a buffet dinner and the recognition of the honorees. Admission tickets are $75 per person, $1,500 for a reserved table of 10 and can be made here or by calling 801-581-3421 or emailing judy.jarrow@utah.edu. The reservation deadline is Oct. 21. Proceeds will further development of the Utah Ski Archives


THAT’S JUST THE CLOTHES TALKING: WHAT YOU WEAR COMMUNICATES MORE THAN TO YOU THINK
Tuesday, Nov. 1, 2016 | 7 p.m.
Little America Hotel, Olympus Room


carla-v-lloyd
Department of Communication’s annual Town & Gown event will feature Carla V. Lloyd, Ph.D., emeritus professor from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University. She is the 2016-’17 Parry D. Sorensen Distinguished Lecturer.

Lloyd will present a short lecture titled, “That’s Just the Clothes Talking:  What You Wear Communicates More than You Think.”
This talk will explore the communication effect of how people dress, including an exploration of personal impression management, politics of appearance, media’s ideal imagery and clothing.

A reception with food and drinks will follow the talk. This event is free and open to anyone.

Please join us.


WILDERNESS MEDICINE IN THE ALPS
Wednesday, Nov. 2,2016 | 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Union Den

wilderness-medicine

This two-week program and six-day adventure will give students the opportunity to get to know some of the most beautiful spots in the Alps – and all by foot! The program will begin with five days of instruction in Chamonix. After one day sightseeing above the Mont Blanc valley, students will start a five day hut-to-hut trek around the highest mountain in Europe, the Mont Blanc.

Students will become familiar with the most common backcountry problems and practice evaluating, treating and evacuating injured persons in wilderness settings.


STREET SCENES: IMAGINING COSMPOLITAN LONDON
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 | 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Language & Communications Building, LNCO 3870


cosmopolitan-london
Come learn about the Summer 2017 Street Scenes: Imagining Cosmopolitan London program. Walking through the streets of London, one experiences a striking range of cultures and subcultures, often within the same neighborhood.

Focusing on representations of urban spaces and street life, this course will consider how writers, artists and filmmakers since the end of the 18th century have imagined just this experience.


FIFTH ANNUAL WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 | 7-10 p.m.
Fort Douglas Post Theater (245 S. Fort Douglas Blvd.)

wild-scenic-film-festival
Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ENVST) is hosting its 5th annual Wild & Scenic Film Festival.  This event builds community while raising funds for ENVST student Scholarships.  Light refreshments will be served as well as a silent auction and a raffle with prizes from national and local sponsors. Cost is $10 for students and $15 for non-students.

For more information and to purchase tickets, click here.


PERFORMING DANCE COMPANY
Thursday, Nov. 3, 2016 | 5:30 p.m.
Marriott Center for Dance, Hayes Christensen Theatre


performing-dance-co
Join the School of Dance Performing Dance Company for five exciting choreographic pieces of poetic energy, transition, and unexpected possibilities. Guest choreographer Jackie Lopez uses light for a powerful piece on resilience in “Warriors of Light.” Sharee Lane’s “Doorway” takes you through a range of moods and emotions, Daniel Clifton and Satu Hummasti use the same forest for two new and separate dances that start from a similar point and Eric Handman employs rigorous but unpredictable formalism resulting in unstable yet inevitable group dynamics.

Free with the U Artspass (UCard) for University of Utah students
$12 Adults
$8 Students, faculty and seniors

Get your tickets here.


GLASS ART SHOW
Friday, Nov. 4-Sunday, Dec. 18, 2016
Red Butte Garden

glass-art
The Glass Art Guild of Utah returns to Red Butte Garden for another stunning show of kiln work and blown glass. Large and small pieces including garden art, decorative boxes, sculptural works and jewelry pieces will display the brilliant colors of this delightful medium.

Items displayed will be available for sale.

Meet the Artists Reception on Saturday, Nov. 12 from 2-6 p.m.

Visit redbuttegarden.org/glass-art-show for more information.


 

JOE HILL LECTURE SERIES, PART 1
Friday, Nov. 4, 2016 | 7-9 p.m.
Marriott Library, Room 1170

joehill_mlib
In November 1915, Joe Hill was killed by a firing squad after being convicted of killing Salt Lake City grocer John Morrison. The execution remains controversial with many aspects of the case still shrouded in mystery. One of Hill’s staunchest defenders was a University of Utah professor named Virginia Snow Stephen. She was the daughter of LDS Church President Lorenzo Snow and worked on many labor related causes. The Salt Lake Tribune’s Jeremy Harmon will discuss local reaction to her role in Hill’s defense and her contention that local police may have been actively intimidating Hill’s supporters to remain silent.


FLORAL SHOW: ORCHIDS
Saturday, Nov. 5-Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016
Red Butte Garden

orchid-show
The Utah Orchid Society will display and sell exotic orchids. Red Butte Garden is the only place you will see this large of an orchid exhibit in Utah.

Free with regular garden admission and free for garden members.

For more information, go here.


EXPECT THE GREAT CONFERENCE
Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016 | 8 a.m.
Union Building lobby

social-media-expect-the-great-2016
Expect the Great is an annual college and career readiness event for Utah’s African American, African and black communities to learn about higher education opportunities, preparing for and applying for college, paying for college and how to be successful in college. Participants will have an opportunity to meet and network with individuals from the community and colleges across the state that can provide information about various support services and opportunities. The event will feature all the major colleges and universities throughout the state. There will also be a career fair for those looking for a new career or to transition.

The event is free, but registration is required.


RWANDA: THE PURSUIT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE, THEN AND NOW
Monday, Nov. 7 | 12 p.m.
Building 73, Hinckley Caucus Room


prosper
Ambassador Pierre-Richard Prosper, who served as a war crimes prosecutor for the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, will speak about his successful prosecution of Jean-Paul Akayesu on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity—including making legal history in prosecuting rape as a war crime. Rape has been listed as an international war crime since 1919, but had never been successfully prosecuted until the 1997 trial. Akayesu, a Hutu and former mayor of a small town in central Rwanda, received a life sentence.

Akayesu’s 14-month trial is the focus of a new documentary, “The Uncondemned,” that spotlights the work of Prosper and co-prosecutor Sara Darehshori and four women who courageously testified. The documentary will debut in Utah on Nov. 18.

The 1994 conflict between the Hutus and Tutsis in Rwanda left more than 800,000 people dead; it is estimated that tens of thousands of women were raped.

Prosper later served as the U.S. ambassador-at-large for war crimes in the George W. Bush administration. He currently lives in Salt Lake City and is a partner at Arent Fox LLP, based in Los Angeles, where he specializes in international government relations and trade, mediation and internal assessments, and investigations on behalf of government entities and companies.

Co-sponsors of the event are the Hinckley Institute of Politics and the S.J. Quinney College of Law.


PRINT APPRECIATION
Friday, Nov. 11, 2016 | 1-9 p.m.
Marriott Library, Book Arts Studio, Level four

printappreciationubn
Come help the Book Arts Program celebrate letterpress printing. With a variety of printing plates and type locked-up on the presses, guest printers (that’s you) can create cards from modular elements overprinted to match individual taste. We invite the public to drop in and print as many cards as time or wallet allow at $5 per card or three cards for $10.


YELLOW LEAVES, SHAKESPEARE AND HIS TIMES: AN EXHIBITION
Now through Friday, Jan. 6, 2017
Marriott Library, Level 4

yellowleavesubnwlogo
In commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, the J. Willard Marriott Library presents an exhibition exploring his life and work.  Centered upon selections from the First Folio (1623) and other historical editions of his poetry and plays, the exhibit examines the historical context of Shakespeare’s writing, posthumous attempts at uncovering his biography, the influences upon his plays, and portrayals of renowned performances.

This exhibition coincides with the visit of a First Folio from the Folger Shakespeare Library, on display at the Salt Lake Public Library from Oct. 8-31, 2016.