HOMECOMING WEEK 2016

By Annalisa Purser, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

The University of Utah’s annual homecoming celebration begins with the student dance on Sept. 30 and culminates on Oct. 8 with the football game against Pac-12 peer the University of Arizona. Inspired by this year’s “#UUThrowback” theme, Homecoming Week provides ways for students, alumni and other U fans to celebrate the U’s rich history and traditions of the past and present. Visit alumni.utah.edu/homecoming for more information and event registration.

Friday, Sept. 30
Homecoming Dance: 8 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Admission: Free with UCard, $10 per non-U student
This year’s dance at The Depot (13 N. 400 West, at The Gateway) features free pizza from The Pie and live music by the band Fictionist from 10 to 11:30 p.m. The first 150 attendees will get a U BlenderBottle, and there will be hourly drawings for other prizes. Admission is at the door. For more information, visit asuu.utah.edu.
homecoming-dance
Tuesday, Oct. 4
House decorating: 4 p.m.
In keeping with tradition, students will participate in a house decorating competition on Greek Row and other campus-area locations. Decorated locations will be judged for originality and interpretation of this year’s decorating theme.
house-decorating
Wednesday, Oct. 5
Emeritus Alumni Reunion: 5:30 p.m.
Admission: $35 per person
U graduates from 40 or more years ago (or age 65 or above) will hold their reunion at the U’s beautiful new Thomas S. Monson Center on South Temple. After reminiscing and renewing acquaintances, attendees can enjoy a tour of the newly remodeled mansion followed by dinner and a presentation by guest speaker Jason Perry, director of the U’s Hinckley Institute of Politics and vice president for Government Relations. Online registration is available to the first 75 registrants at alumni.utah.edu/homecoming.
alumni-reunion
Thursday, Oct. 6
Songfest: 6 p.m.; Crimson Rally: 7:30 p.m.
The energy on campus really starts to heat up in anticipation of the homecoming football game against Arizona, beginning with the annual Greek Songfest presentation of song-and-dance routines, judged for creativity and presentation in the Union Ballroom at 6 p.m. The annual Crimson Rally will get under way immediately after Songfest concludes, on the Union Lawn at 7:30 p.m. The pep rally features remarks by Head Football Coach Kyle Whittingham and some of his players, the marching band, cheerleaders and the U’s mascot, Swoop, who turned 20 this year. Both events are free and open to the public.
crimson-rally
Friday, Oct. 7
Homecoming Scramble Golf Tournament: 9 a.m.
After a one-year hiatus, alumni and U fans will once again hit the Bonneville Golf Course for the 18-hole Homecoming Scramble Golf Tournament, which helps fund University of Utah student scholarships and Huntsman Cancer Institute. Visit alumni.utah.edu/homecoming to register your foursome.
golf-scramble
Friday-Sunday, Oct. 7-9
Parent and Family Weekend
Parents and families of U students are invited to spend time on campus and take part in homecoming weekend festivities. Register online at orientation.utah.edu/parents.
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Saturday, Oct. 8
Homecoming Day

5K: 8:30 a.m.
Day-of registration: 7:30-8:15 a.m.
Registration fees: U faculty/U staff/Alumni Association members, $25 in advance per runner/walker/stroller; U students, $23 advance; other adults, $30 in advance; $35 day-of, per participant.

Kids 1K: 9:15 a.m.
Day-of registration: 7:30-9 a.m.
Registration fee: $15 per child in advance, or $20 day-of run
Kids 1K fun run for children ages 12 and younger.

u5k

On Homecoming Day, participants of all ages and abilities are invited to the U’s former law school building, 332 S. 1400 East, for the ever-popular 5K and Kids 1K on the U campus. The 5K and Kids 1K are organized by the Alumni Association’s Young Alumni Board to raise scholarship funds for students. Two students will be selected to receive $500 scholarships, and the two student groups with the largest number of race entries will each be awarded a $1,000 scholarship. Other prizes are awarded to participants in various categories, including the fastest male and female runner, and runners wearing the best red-themed costume. Online registration is available through Oct. 5 at alumni.utah.edu/5krace.

Ute Walk: 5 p.m.
When the players arrive, join the fun Ute Walk procession north down Guardsman Way to Rice-Eccles Stadium.


Utah vs. Arizona Pre-game Tailgate: 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Admission: $20 Alumni Association members and a guest; $25 per nonmember adult; children under age 2, free.
Utah fans can get pumped up for the game and enjoy food, music, fun and prizes at the tailgate party at 500 South and Guardsman Way (east of the tennis center). Online registration available through Oct. 5 at alumni.utah.edu/homecoming.
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Utah vs. Arizona Homecoming Football Game: 8 p.m. kickoff
At Rice-Eccles Stadium. Go Utes!

U CELEBRATES 2016 PRIDE WEEK

By Estela Hernandez, public relations and events specialist, University of Utah Office for Equity and Diversity

Pride Week 2016 at the University of Utah runs Sept. 28-Oct. 6, and will feature photographer Jeff Sheng and QueerCrip fashion designer Sky Cubacub. This year’s theme, “Queering Safe Spaces” explores the meaning of safe spaces and how they affect those included or excluded within the LGBTQI community.

“The theme, Queering Safe Spaces, is important because it is an invitation to critically engage with our own assumptions about this campus, the safe spaces we think exist here, and the interventions made by students, staff, faculty and administration to create and maintain safe spaces,” said Kim Hackford-Peer, associate director for Gender Studies and Pride Week committee co-chair. “We hope to expand our individual and collective thinking about what safe spaces exist. What do they promise to provide? What are their limits? And how can we do better?”

Pride Week activities at the U are listed below. All events are free and open to the public unless noted otherwise.

Hinckley Forum: Pizza & Politics
Sanctuary Spaces: The Promise and Limits of Safe Spaces
Sep. 28, 12 p.m., Building 73, Room 110, 332 S. 1400 East
When it comes to sanctuary spaces for the LGBTQIA community, often times these spaces are found in realms of art, athletics or various social pockets in the community. Sanctuary spaces offer refuge and a sense of freedom for the LGBTQIA community. But what happens when these spaces end up excluding parts of the community or are no longer safe? What are the actual characteristics of a sanctuary space and how do people create their own safe space? The Hinckley Forum explores these topics. Panelists include Darrin Hathaway, high school theater arts educator; Romeo Jackson, graduate student at the U; Ana Maria Lopez, associate vice president for Equity and Inclusion in Health Sciences; C. Kai Medina-Martinez, director of the LGBT Resource Center at the U; Kira Kiko Lian, program coordinator at the School for Social and Cultural Transformation and a recent Gender Studies graduate.
Voices of Diversity Social Justice Series
B. Cole: Blurring the Lines of Gender
Oct. 3, 6-8 p.m. Social Work Goodwill Building, Okazaki Community Meeting Room (155 B), 395 S. 1500 East
B. Cole is the executive director of the Brown Boi Project, an organization that works across race and gender to eradicate sexism, homophobia and transphobia and to create frameworks for transformative masculinity. This session will explore the intersection of race and gender from first and second wave feminist approaches while integrating queer theory. The event is sponsored by Voices of Diversity, an organization in the U’s College of Social Work, that works toward a greater understanding of and advocacy for social justice issues.
Voices of Diversity Social Justice Series
B. Cole: Life Hacking for Students of Color
Oct. 4, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Social Work Goodwill Building, Okazaki Community Meeting Room (155A), 395 S. 1500 East
B. Cole will discuss the power of collective work, specifically as it relates to navigating college as a first-generation student. Lunch will be provided, but registration is required. Email Irene.ota@socwk@utah.edu.
Jeff Sheng: Fearless
Oct. 5, 12 p.m.
Olpin Student Union Building, East Ballroom, 200 Central Campus Drive
Jeff Sheng is an American photographer whose work focuses on the 21st century LGBT rights movement and has been featured in The New York Times Magazine, Time magazine, The Advocate and The New Yorker. The Fearless Project was born in 2003, when he began photographing LGBT high school and college athletes who were “out” to their teammates. Sheng calls this an artistic self-exploration of his own identity as a former closeted high school athlete. The Fearless Project has been exhibited and presented at several college campuses and at venues such as the headquarters for Nike, ESPN and NCAA.

Sheng will be available to photograph local “out” athletes. To schedule, contact estela.hernandez@utah.edu.

Photographs from The Fearless Project will be exhibited in the Union building’s main lobby through Oct. 6.

Sky Cubacub: Rebirth Garments Fashion Performance and Talk-back
Oct. 6, 6 p.m. Spencer Fox Eccles Business Building, Child Family Community Hall, 1655 Campus Center Drive
Sky Cubacub is the founder and designer for Rebirth Garments, a line of gender nonconforming wearables for people on the full spectrum of gender, size and ability. Cubacub’s designs are guided by the assertion that trans communities and people with disabilities have very particular clothing needs. Rather than opting for mainstream clothing, which often pathologize and erase these particular identities, Cubacub designs for radical visibility.

Cubacub will host a performance of her garments. To be a part of the show, contact rebirth.garments@gmail.com. No prior experience required.

The performances will be followed by a discussion of Cubacub’s QueerCrip Dress Reform Movement Manifesto.

EFFECTIVE INTEGRATION

By Brooke Adams, communications specialist, University Marketing and Communications

Professor Caren J. Frost is the director of the newly launched Center for Research on Migration & Refugee Integration. Housed in the College of Social Work, the center aims to advance the understanding and practice of effective integration of new Americans. @theU spoke with Professor Frost about the new center.

Center Director Caren J. Frost addresses audience at the launch of the new Center for Research on Migration & Refugee Integration.

Center Director Caren J. Frost addresses audience at the launch of the new Center for Research on Migration & Refugee Integration.

Q: What led to the creation of the center?

A: The center is the result of a year-long discussion between the college, university faculty and community partners. We recognized a need for a central place for sharing information and developing practices that would improve not only Utah’s refugee services but be a model for communities throughout the country.

Q: What challenges do refugees and immigrants face?

A: Each year, approximately 1,200 refugees resettle in Utah and a similar number of immigrants move here. These new residents have made it to the U.S. but face obstacles due to language and cultural differences. Many have experienced trauma, which led them to leave their native countries, and have unique mental health challenges. They need help navigating our systems — health care, employment, transportation, education, housing.


Q: What exactly will the center do?

A: This is the first academic center west of the Mississippi River to focus on immigrant and refugee populations. It will work in three arenas: research, education and outreach.

Our initial effort will be to create a network of university and community researchers who will explore issues related to integration. We also want to provide education and outreach to refugees and immigrants living in the Salt Lake Valley and attending the University of Utah. In the spring, we’ll host a research conference that brings together a consortium of researchers from throughout the Intermountain West to share their work. And we’ll host a “Welcome Day” to bring high school students to the campus.


Q: What are the center’s initial areas of focus?

A: Our immediate research focus will be on youth and parenting challenges; development of a certification process for accepting academic and professional degrees granted in other countries; and an assessment of currently available services and research being done on refugee and immigrant issues.


Q: Who else is involved in the center?

A: Our partners include the International Rescue Committee, Utah Department of Workforce Services’ Refugee Services Office, Catholic Community Services, the University of Utah Division of Public Health and the Salt Lake City Mayor’s Office.

We’re going to be everywhere! I want us to be the university media and communities turn to when they need the best information on and practices related to integration of new Americans.

FLIP THE SWITCH

By Melinda Rogers, media relations manager, University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law

The University of Utah will officially “flip the switch” to unveil a new solar parking canopy in the southwest corner of campus designed to save energy and serve as part of a broader sustainability plan.

A short explanation of the solar canopy project will take place at 10 a.m. on Friday, Oct.7, at the structure, which is near 383 S. University Street. A symbolic “flipping of the switch” will follow brief remarks.

law-solar-2The new solar canopy covers about 40 parking spaces and will provide 100 kilowatts of power. The project was funded by the S.J. Quinney College of Law, the Alternative Visions Fund of the Chicago Community Trust and the Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund. The project is the result of a joint partnership between the U’s law school, Sustainability Office, Facilities Management and Commuter Services.

“This pilot project has the potential to help create the organizational structure needed to significantly expand solar on campus, while adding no additional costs or fees to students. By bringing together these amazing donors, academic leadership from the College of Law, Commuter Services and Facilities Management, we are able to help the campus transition toward clean and renewable power,” said Myron Willson, deputy chief sustainability officer at the University of Utah.

The idea for the canopy started several years ago, after a report by MBA students working with the Sustainability Office and Commuter Services in 2010 found that adding solar panel shade structures in campus parking lots would provide significant energy cost savings over time.

The canopy will produce approximately 132,000 kilowatt hours of clean electricity per year, according to Bill Burgoyne of Solar Fulfillment, a contractor who worked with the U to implement the project on campus. That amount of electricity is equal to the amount used to power an average of 14 average homes per year and is projected to save the U about $10,600 in annual power costs, Burgoyne said.

“The project will assist the University of Utah to work toward a goal of generating 20 percent of its power from renewable energy by 2025,” said Burgoyne. “Solar carports are becoming more popular across the country due to multiple benefits,” he added.

Robert Adler, dean of the S.J. Quinney College of Law, noted the law school’s contribution to the project came about as a result of a donation from the Alternative Visions Fund of the Chicago Community Trust, which provided a $4 million donation to fund sustainability features in the newly constructed law school building and a $500,000 challenge gift to encourage others to give to building green fund.

The donation allowed the law school — which celebrated its first anniversary Sept. 1 by announcing it received a LEED platinum designation — to include smart structural design in its construction, resulting in the facility achieving a greater than 50 percent reduction in energy costs beyond code requirements. Other sustainability features made possible through the donation included smart lighting systems, maximum use of natural light, window technology that reduces bird collisions and electric car charging stations. The law school was able to partner with the Sustainability Office and Commuter Services to include the solar parking structure as part of the overall sustainability initiatives that are a part of the new law school building.

“We are honored to serve as a representation of incorporating sustainability features, both internal and external, into the construction of an iconic facility and hope that our building will serve as an example to other university building projects and the community at large,” said Adler.

For more information about the University of Utah’s overall sustainability initiatives, visit: sustainability.utah.edu.

SINK YOUR TEETH INTO IT

Loss of megaherbivores such as elephants and hippos can allow woody plants and non-grassy herbs and flowering plants to encroach on grasslands in African national parks, according to a new University of Utah study, published September 12 in Scientific Reports. The study used isotopes in hippopotamus teeth to find a shift in the diet of hippos over the course of a decade in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park following widespread elephant poaching in the 1970s.

Study first author and U postdoctoral scholar Kendra Chritz says that her method of using hippo enamel isotopes could help scientists reconstruct past changes in vegetation in Africa’s national parks, areas with relatively little ongoing scientific observation. The results could give ecologists an idea of what could happen to Africa’s grasslands if elephants, whose populations are steeply declining, went extinct or reached near-extinction.

“We have a window into what these environments could look like without megaherbivores, and it’s kind of grim,” Chritz says.

Elephants crossing a highway outside of Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

PHOTO CREDIT: Kendra Chritz

Elephants crossing a highway outside of Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

Competing plant classes
Grasslands are an important ecosystem in Africa, hosting many animals and serving as corridors for wildlife movement. Lowland tropical grasses, such as those in elephant ecosystems, are part of the C4 class of plants, a reference to the enzyme used to process carbon dioxide into sugars during photosynthesis. Corn and sugarcane are also C4 plants. C3 plants, which use a different enzyme, include trees, shrubs, flowering plants and herbs.

C3 plants compete for resources with C4 grasses in African savannas, including sunlight. Elephants and other megaherbivores help keep woody plant encroachment in check by browsing seasonally on shrubs and trees. But without that herbivore control, C3 plants can advance on grasslands unimpeded.

The presence of shrubs and trees, which can be seen in aerial photographs, give only a partial picture of the balance of power between C3 and C4 plants. Observing herbs and flowering plants requires ground-level observation, and records of such observations in Uganda’s Queen Elizabeth National Park, and many national parks in Africa, is sparse.

The two plant groups’ metabolic processes treat isotopes of carbon differently, so that C4 plants have a higher proportion of heavy carbon isotopes than C3 plants. As animals, such as hippos, eat plants, and the isotopic signatures of the plants in their diet are incorporated into the animals’ bodies and preserved in durable tissue, such as teeth. The hippos of Queen Elizabeth National Park, Chritz found, had been indirectly “observing” the plant makeup of the grasslands all along.

Ecological crisis in Queen Elizabeth
Queen Elizabeth National Park sits on the border between Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and covers the channel that connects two lakes. In 1971, Idi Amin became president of Uganda, and management of the national parks essentially ceased. The Ugandan military killed thousands of elephants between 1971 and the mid-1980s, both to sell ivory to fund the regime and as food. Aggressive poaching continued after Amin’s ouster, and by the mid-80s the park’s elephant population had dropped from more than four thousand down to around 150. Around 4,000 hippos were poached as well.

Studies showed increased areas of woody plants in the park once management resumed in the 1990s. Because the change happened over a span of a few decades, Queen Elizabeth National Park was an ideal ecosystem in which to test whether herbivore teeth could represent the shift from C4 to C3 plants.

Kendra Chritz sampling hippo canine enamel by kerosene lamplight in Queen Elizabeth National Park.

PHOTO CREDIT: Courtesy of Kendra Chritz

Kendra Chritz sampling hippo canine enamel by kerosene lamplight in Queen Elizabeth National Park.

Getting and testing the teeth
Hippo teeth are not easy to come by, Chritz says. The teeth haven’t been used before for isotope analysis due to the difficulty of obtaining samples from a wide range of time periods. One of Chritz’s co-authors, Hans Klingel of Universitaet Braunschweig in Germany, conducted important research on the behavior of hippos in Queen Elizabeth National Park in the 1980s and 90s. He contributed teeth from the 1960s, pre-poaching, and from 2000. Chritz and her colleagues sampled enamel every centimeter along the length of each tooth, using known growth rates to correlate sections of the tooth to different years. All of these samples taken together recorded diet history from approximately the last decade of the animal’s life. But analysis showed that the two teeth displayed very different isotopic signatures. Chritz needed a third sample, in between the two time periods.

While in Uganda in 2013, Chritz approached the current game warden about obtaining another hippo tooth. The warden showed her a skeleton on display at a park museum from a hippo that died in 1991 – perfectly within the time range Chritz had aimed for. (Hear more about the retrieval of the tooth and about sampling it in adverse conditions here).

Results showed that the 1960s hippo ate approximately 80 percent C4 plants, and that the percentage of C4 in the later hippos’ diets had dropped to around 65 percent. This showed that, within a time scale of only a few decades, C3 plant encroachment had progressed enough to significantly impact the diets of the animals in the park. The results also showed the validity of Chritz’s method and reconstructed the progression of vegetation changes since the 1960s.

Another surprise in the results was the proportion of C3 plants in the later hippos’ diets. Initial studies of hippo diets surmised that hippos only ate grass. “And few researchers have suggested otherwise,” Chritz says. “It appears that they’re actually quite flexible in their diets and adaptable to environmental change.”

Elephants crossing a highway outside of Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

PHOTO CREDIT: Kendra Chritz

Elephants crossing a highway outside of Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda.

Restoring grasslands
The clear implication from Chritz’s work is that the loss of elephants and other megaherbivores can lead to rapid environmental and ecological change. “We’ve built a record that shows just how drastic the loss of megaherbivores in a park can be on a very short timescale,” she says. “Within ten years, we see a big change in what’s happening in this once diverse grassy area of the park. This is a window into the future of what could to happen in East African savannas as elephants continue to be poached at the currently unprecedented rate.”

Chritz is hopeful that restoring elephant populations could reverse the changes and cause the grasslands to re-emerge.

“But when you have too many elephants, they can also decimate forests by over-browsing,” she says. “There’s a balance you have to reach. The most important thing right now is to work hard at fighting poaching.”
People can combat poaching by reducing the demand and financial incentive for harvesting the elephants’ tusks, Chritz says. “Not purchasing ivory and knowing which products you might use that are made from ivory is the best thing you can do to protect elephants.”

The full study can be found here.

A WORK OF ART

By Mindy Wilson, public relations and marketing director, Utah Museum of Fine Arts

The university’s fine arts museum reopens two key spaces this fall, moving one step closer to reopening the entire Marcia and John Price Museum Building to the public next year.

This month UMFA, closed since mid-January for remodeling, is again hosting films, artist talks and campus events in the Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium. The newly remodeled museum cafe is also expected to reopen mid-October.

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The updated museum cafe, expected to reopen mid-month, features expanded window seating for dine-alone customers—and plenty of electrical outlets.

“Our auditorium and cafe are active hubs for learning and conversation on campus, so we’re thrilled the building project has progressed this far and we can share these spaces with the community again,” said executive director Gretchen Dietrich. “Best of all, it means that our grand reopening is in sight.”

UMFA galleries will reopen to the public the first weekend of fall semester 2017, Aug. 26–27.

Since UMFA paused its exhibition program eight months ago, contractors have been installing a state-of-the-art vapor barrier that will extend the lifespan of the building, which protects the nearly 20,000 art objects UMFA stewards for the university and the people of Utah. Meanwhile, UMFA staff members have been busy behind and beyond the museum’s doors—and the community has noticed.

In Salt Lake Magazine’s July/August 2016 Best of the Beehive issue, the UMFA was named Best Museum without Walls, thanks to its packed calendar of monthly lectures, community art projects and school outreach programs that engaged thousands of adults and students statewide.

Meanwhile, collections staff members have been busy conserving objects and preparing for reinstallation while protecting the museum’s collection during the ongoing construction. Curators are finalizing new visions—including fresh storylines, layouts and lists of objects—for most permanent collection galleries, including new dedicated spaces for African and Asian art.

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On Thursday at 7 p.m., Mexican artist Guillermo Galindo will perform original compositions on musical instruments he’s created from objects found at the U.S.-Mexico border. Angel Exterminador (wall gong), 2015, discarded old border.

“We’ve been working as hard as ever—keeping the art safe, bringing great art experiences to people in and around the state, and re-envisioning how best to serve our diverse audiences when we reopen,” added Dietrich.

This month’s events in UMFA’s Dumke Auditorium:

  • Experimental composer Guillermo Galindo will present his work on Thursday, Oct. 6 at 7 p.m. as part of the ARTLandish: Land Art, Landscape, and the Environment series
  • Internationally acclaimed contemporary artist Trevor Paglen will give a talk on Thursday, Oct. 27 at 7 p.m. as part of the ARTLandish series
  • On Wednesday, Oct. 26 at 7 p.m. the 2016 documentary “The Silence of Mark Rothko” will be presented as part of the UMFA’s re-launch of the Creativity in Focus film series with the Utah Film Center.

 

THE MYSTERIES OF SCIENCE

The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science will hold a workshop on Oct. 5 to teach scientists how to talk about their work in accessible terms with the public. Although registration for the full one-day workshop has closed, a free open plenary session will be held from 8:30-10 a.m. at the Fort Douglas Officer’s Club, 150 South Fort Douglas Blvd. Light breakfast refreshments will be served at 8:15 a.m.

“Scientists invest decades of their lives delving into the mysteries of their science, and discovering answers to many its most fascinating questions,” said Cynthia Furse, associate vice president for research. “But then it can be very difficult to remember back, often decades, to when you didn’t know the science you have been so deeply engaged in discovering.  It can be challenging, and also very rewarding, for a scientist to reach out to the general public, or even other scientists, and be able to explain their discoveries and their importance.”

Participants at the plenary session will learn how to convey technical concepts in short, clear messages for non-scientists. In interactive exercises, participants will engage in improvisation and will practice communicating clearly. After the plenary session, registered participants will dive deeper into concepts of improvisation, long used as a creative exercise by actors. They will also work on distilling a scientific message into its basic jargon-free components. The workshop, which will visit Utah State University Oct. 3-4, is co-sponsored by iUTAH, a multi-institutional research and training program aimed at strengthening science for Utah’s water future.

Named for actor and science communication advocate Alan Alda, the Center for Communicating Science is located in the Stony Brook University School of Journalism. The center teaches courses on science communication at the Stony Brook campus, but also travels to institutions around the country to teach workshops to scientists and medical professionals. The center also sponsors science outreach programs such as the Flame Challenge, which challenges scientists to explain basic phenomena such as flame, sound or sleep in terms that an 11-year old can understand easily.

“Scientists can read the poetry of nature, but unless they speak to us with clarity, we’re left out,” Alda said, in a brochure for the center. “That’s not good for us or for science.”

See here for a map and directions to the Officer’s Club.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Optimal well-being online course series
Get discounts through U Community Solar and U Drive Electric
Fifth annual planning successful meetings on campus conference
Spring 2017 textbook adoptions due Oct. 15
University Teaching Committee awards
Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway presented by America First Credit Union
MathWorks MATLAB Total Academic Headcount site license for U community


OPTIMAL WELL-BEING ONLINE COURSE SERIES

course-announcement2
This spring, three low-cost optimal well-being online courses will be offered online by national experts. Participate from anywhere at any time. Each seven-week course is only $90 and consists of online reading materials, video and audio lectures, practice exercises and an optional discussion each week. No papers or tests required.

Receive 50 percent off any online course with early registration before Oct. 31, 2016, by 5 p.m. Use promo code: discount.

For a list of classes being offered and to register, go here.


GET DISCOUNTS THROUGH U COMMUNITY SOLAR AND U DRIVE ELECTRIC

u-community-logos
The Sustainability Office is running two community discount programs that support creative solutions to improve environmental impacts. U Community Solar offers U community members the opportunity to get rooftop solar panels and installation for their homes at a discounts. U Drive Electric offers discounts on several makes and models of electric and plug-in-hybrid vehicles. Both of these programs run through Oct. 31, 2016.

To learn more and to sign up, visit: U Community Solar and U Drive Electric.


FIFTH ANNUAL PLANNING SUCCESSFUL MEETINGS ON CAMPUS CONFERENCE


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Wednesday, Oct. 19, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Fort Douglas Ballroom at the University Guest House

The Guest House will host all hospital and campus meeting planners for a FREE educational conference. Experts from campus will update planners on all that is happening at the University for planning meetings, events, or conferences.

Agenda includes:

  • Office of General Counsel: Updated Alcohol Policy on Campus
  • Commuter Services: 2016 Updates
  • U Shop: Overview of Purchasing on Campus
  • New Meeting Spaces on Campus
  • Latest Trends in Catering
  • Do’s and Don’ts of Booking Hotel Room Blocks
  • Meet with Campus Vendors: Partners in Successful Campus Meetings

Register online until Friday, Oct. 14, 2016.

It’s all free and sure to help you become an expert Meeting Planner in your department.

  • Breakfast and lunch provided
  • Free parking at the Guest House and Officers Club
  • Networking with departments on campus that facilitate meetings and events

Questions about the event call:  801-587-2925.


SPRING 2017 TEXTBOOK ADOPTIONS DUE OCT. 15

textbooks-photo
If you have not submitted your textbook adoptions to the University Campus Store for 2017 spring or summer semesters, it’s not too late. Submitting adoptions is as easy—simply complete the University Campus Store’s online textbook adoption form. If you need assistance in submitting your textbook information, please contact Dave Nelson at 801-581-8321 or dnelson@CampusStore.utah.edu.

The prompt submission of textbook adoptions by faculty each semester enables the Campus Store to stock necessary books in a timely manner and increases the chances of offering used textbooks, eBooks and rental textbooks, which help students save up to 50% off of new book prices. The Campus Store relies heavily on your timely response, so please do not delay.

Thank you for your ongoing support of the Campus Store’s textbook adoption program, best wishes for another great academic year.


UNIVERSITY TEACHING COMMITTEE AWARDS

University-Teaching-Awards-2016-17
The University Teaching Committee encourages the efforts of faculty members, departments and colleges to improve individual teaching skills, devise effective teaching techniques and recognize and reward superior achievements in teaching. A variety of awards are now seeking nominations.

To see criteria and deadlines, click here.


UTAH RED ZONE FAN CAVE GIVEAWAY PRESENTED BY AMERICA FIRST CREDIT UNION

Fan Cave
Utah Red Zone and America First Credit Union are working together to give one lucky Utah Football fan the best seat in the house with the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway. Utah Red Zone will make one fan’s living room have as much Utah pride as they do with a fully furnished and decorated fan cave for the perfect home and away game experience.

The Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway grand prize includes:

  • Samsung 65″ Class 4K Ultra HD TV
  • (2) Imperial University of Utah Recliners
  • Blakeway framed Rice-Eccles Stadium panorama
  • Northwest Utah tapestry woven blanket
  • Northwest Utah plush throw blanket
  • Northwest Utah rug
  • Legacy Utah vintage game poster artwork
  • Legacy Utah wall-mount bottle opener
  • Legacy Utah serving tray
  • Paulson Designs Utah athletic logo canvas art
  • Authentic Street Signs “Man Cave” sign
  • Dahl large vinyl decal

and more Utah Red Zone merchandise.

Utah fans can enter to win the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway by going to URedZone.com/FanCaveGiveaway. The lucky winner will be randomly selected at the conclusion of the Utah Football season.

For more information, call or visit Utah Red Zone or the University Campus Store.


MATHWORKS MATLAB TOTAL ACADEMIC HEADCOUNT SITE LICENSE FOR U COMMUNITY

Software-Licensing
The University of Utah has negotiated and obtained a campus wide MathWorks MATLAB Total Academic Headcount site license for MATLAB, Simulink and 48 companion software products.

Access to the products will be available through the Office of Software License web store beginning Sept. 1, 2016, and the software is available to all students, faculty and staff for academic purposes, including academic research.

Information regarding this license, product pricing and the available products can be found here./bs_col]

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Optimal well-being online course series
Get discounts through U Community Solar and U Drive Electric
Graduate sooner with fall break intensive classes
Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway presented by America First Credit Union
MathWorks MATLAB Total Academic Headcount site license for U community


OPTIMAL WELL-BEING ONLINE COURSE SERIES

course-announcement2
This spring, three low-cost optimal well-being online courses will be offered online by national experts. Participate from anywhere at any time. Each seven-week course is only $90 and consists of online reading materials, video and audio lectures, practice exercises and an optional discussion each week. No papers or tests required.

Receive 50 percent off any online course with early registration before Oct. 31, 2016, by 5 p.m. Use promo code: discount.

For a list of classes being offered and to register, go here.


GET DISCOUNTS THROUGH U COMMUNITY SOLAR AND U DRIVE ELECTRIC

u-community-logos

The Sustainability Office is running two community discount programs that support creative solutions to improve environmental impacts. U Community Solar offers U community members the opportunity to get rooftop solar panels and installation for their homes at a discounts. U Drive Electric offers discounts on several makes and models of electric and plug-in-hybrid vehicles. Both of these programs run through Oct. 31, 2016.

To learn more and to sign up, visit: U Community Solar and U Drive Electric.


GRADUATE SOONER WITH FALL BREAK INTENSIVE CLASSES

Grad Girl
Short on credits for fall semester? It’s not too late to register for a fall break (Oct 10-14, 2016) intensive general education course. Courses are offered at the U’s Sandy Center and main campus and will be completed over the one-week period. This is a great option for students who need one more class for financial aid or scholarships, need a replacement class, or want to reduce class load throughout the rest of the semester. Register for a fall break intensive course and graduate sooner.

Course listings and more information can be found here.


UTAH RED ZONE FAN CAVE GIVEAWAY PRESENTED BY AMERICA FIRST CREDIT UNION

Fan Cave
Utah Red Zone and America First Credit Union are working together to give one lucky Utah Football fan the best seat in the house with the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway. Utah Red Zone will make one fan’s living room have as much Utah pride as they do with a fully furnished and decorated fan cave for the perfect home and away game experience.

The Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway grand prize includes:

  • Samsung 65″ Class 4K Ultra HD TV
  • (2) Imperial University of Utah Recliners
  • Blakeway framed Rice-Eccles stadium panorama
  • Northwest Utah tapestry woven blanket
  • Northwest Utah plush throw blanket
  • Northwest Utah rug
  • Legacy Utah vintage game poster artwork
  • Legacy Utah wall-mount bottle opener
  • Legacy Utah serving tray
  • Paulson Designs Utah athletic logo canvas art
  • Authentic Street Signs “Man Cave” sign
  • Dahl large vinyl decal

and more Utah Red Zone merchandise.

Utah fans can enter to win the Utah Red Zone Fan Cave Giveaway by going to URedZone.com/FanCaveGiveaway. The lucky winner will be randomly selected at the conclusion of the Utah Football season.

For more information, call or visit Utah Red Zone or the University Campus Store.


MATHWORKS MATLAB TOTAL ACADEMIC HEADCOUNT SITE LICENSE FOR U COMMUNITY

Software-Licensing
The University of Utah has negotiated and obtained a campus wide MathWorks MATLAB Total Academic Headcount site license for MATLAB, Simulink and 48 companion software products.

Access to the products will be available through the Office of Software License web store beginning Sept. 1, 2016, and the software is available to all students, faculty and staff for academic purposes, including academic research.

Information regarding this license, product pricing and the available products can be found here./bs_col]


 

Highlighted Events

DOWNWINDERS OF UTAH ARCHIVE LAUNCH EVENT
Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 | 10 a.m.-12 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library Gould Auditorium

dnwwnderslaunchlowres
The Downwinders of Utah Archive brings together information on Utah’s nuclear history and focuses on individuals, families, and areas that were impacted by nuclear testing. It serves as a resource and aims to educate future generations in hopes that the mistakes of the past will never occur again.

Featured Speakers Including

▪ Mary Dickson, playwright (“Exposed,” 2007), downwinders advocate
▪ Jim Matheson, former U.S. congressman, downwinders advocate
▪ Justin Sorensen, GIS specialist, Downwinders of Utah Archive creator


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 | 3 p.m.
Carolyn Tanner Irish Humanities Building, Room 109

Academic-Senate
The next Academic Senate meeting will be held on Monday, Oct. 3 at 3 p.m. in 109 CTIHB. Meetings are open to the public.

Agenda items for the upcoming meeting include new courses of study in construction engineering, hydrology and environmental and sustainability studies, as well as a State of Athletics report from Chris Hill.


FALL BREAK CATARACT CANYON RAFTING TRIP
Pre-trip meeting: Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 | 5 p.m. @ Outdoor Adventures
Friday, Oct. 7-Saturday, Oct. 15, 2016

oa-fall-16-cataract-canyon-box
Spend your fall break in Canyonlands National Park with Outdoor Adventures as we raft some big whitewater and float through some beautiful desert landscapes. This week long trip will give you the opportunity to relax and forget about the stress of your busy semester. Cataract Canyon is a classic OA trip that you don’t want to miss out on. Trips are only open to University of Utah students, faculty and staff (including their guests).

$275 + tax

Call 801-581-8516 or come to Outdoor Adventures to register.


‘DOWNWINDERS’ FILM SCREENING – DID THE GOVERNMENT KILL JOHN WAYNE
Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 | 6-8:30 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium

downwindersfilmpanelmlib1
No Tickets are Required for the Viewing.

A conversation will follow the film with panelists:
Jim Matheson, former congressman
Mary Dickson, advocate, playwrite (Exposed)
Tyler Bastian, co-director
J. Truman, downwinders advocate
Fred Esplin, vice president of Institutional Advancement, moderator


B. COLE: BLURRING THE LINES OF GENDER
Monday, Oct. 3, 2016 | 6-8 p.m.
College of Social Work, Okazaki Community Meeting Room

blurring-gender
B. Cole is the executive director of the Brown Boi Project, an organization that works across race and gender to eradicate sexism, homophobia and transphobia and to create frameworks for transformative masculinity. This session will explore the intersection of race and gender from first and second wave feminist approaches while integrating queer theory. The event is sponsored by Voices of Diversity, an organization in the U’s College of Social Work, that works toward a greater understanding of and advocacy for social justice issues.


TACO TUESDAY
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 | 11 a.m.-1 p.m.

Union, first floor

taco-tuesday
Celebrate Taco Tuesday and National Taco Day with Union Programming Council with free tacos.

Open (Taco) Bar opens at 11 a.m. in front of Einsteins on the first floor.

See you there.


HERBERT, WEINHOLTZ TO DISCUSS ISSUES IN INFORMED DECISIONS PUBLIC FORUM
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 | 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law, Moot Courtroom

mike-w-herbert
Incumbent Gov. Gary Herbert and challenger Michael Weinholtz will join Hinckley Institute of Politics director Jason Perry to talk education, health care, public lands, water, tax policy and other issues in the Moot Court Room, S.J. Quinney College of Law.

Oct. 4, 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. — Mike Weinholtz
Oct. 4, 11:15 a.m. to noon — Gov. Gary Herbert


LIFE HACKING FOR STUDENTS OF COLOR
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
College of Social Work, Okazaki Community Meeting Room

b-cole
As students of color, it is important to understand the culture that surrounds higher education. Join B. Cole for a conversation on how to make the most of your college experience. From life planning to understanding cultural capital, Cole dives into navigating the education system as a first-generation student, building power and community other students of color.


WOMEN IN BUSINESS LUNCHEON
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 | 12-1:30 p.m.
Bill & Pat Child Family Community Hall, School of Business

natalie-gochnour
As our country faces tough 2016 election decisions, the Eccles School, Women in Business student organization and Alumni groups have teamed up to bring a free lunch, networking and a public policy discussion led by Natalie Gochnour to the women in our community. All female-identifying students, staff, faculty and alumni are welcome to attend.

Register here.


DIGITAL MATTERS POP-UP OPEN HOUSE
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 | 1-4 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library, level two

digital-matters_ubn
Stop by for light refreshments and to learn about some of the new scholarship and technology happening in the digital environment. Students, faculty and staff are invited.

Bring a friend!


HUMANITIES IN MOTION: ROME INFORMATION SESSION
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 | 3-4 p.m.
Language & Communication Bldg (LNCO)

humanities-in-motion
Come learn about the Summer 2017 Humanities in Motion: Rome program. Map Rome’s cultural footprint from antiquity to today in a 10-day odyssey. Explore the life of Romans through the eternal city’s most important epochs. Visit iconic sites including the Coliseum & Vatican City, and discover off the beaten path neighborhoods including Testaccio & Trastevere. Full-day service projects to give back to the city that give us roads, medicine, education, sanitation, irrigation, law, public order, and the toga! Day excursions to Ostia Antica & Orvieto.Join us for a Humanities in Motion Learning Abroad program information session! Hear from faculty on what to expect on this new faculty-led program.

Click here for more information.


FALL SEMESTER 3D PRINTING WORKSHOPS…AND MORE
Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays | 2-3 p.m.
Fridays | 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
J. Willard Marriott Library

TJHololensProfile
3-D Printing on Tuesdays.

3-D Modeling on Wednesdays.

Arduino & Raspberry Pi on Thursdays.

Open Design Experience on Fridays: 3-D Printing, 3-D Modeling, Arduino & Raspberry Pi, 3-D Design, Materials Collection, 3-D Pens, Snap Circuits, Oculus Rift, Microsoft Hololens, 3-D Printing

For more info, click here.


FOOD ENTREPRENEUR: CHEAP EAT SKILLS
Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016 | 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Lassonde Studios

food-entrepreneur
With the right tools and know-how, every college student can eat healthily, cheaply and tastily. Learn the basics of weekly meal planning, and you’ll never need to eat ramen again. Register online.

Click here for more information.


FREE YOGA
Wednesdays beginning Aug. 31-Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016 | 12 -1 p.m.
Thursdays beginning Sept. 1-Dec. 15, 2016 | 7-8 a.m.
Eccles Library, Synapse, Garden Level

free-yoga---fall-2016
Join us for free yoga at the Eccles Library from Aug. 31-Dec. 15. Drop by for one or attend all events.

Please bring your own mat.


OPEN PLENARY SESSION: ALAN ALDA CENTER FOR COMMUNICATING SCIENCE
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 | 8:30-10 a.m.
Officer’s Club – University Guest House

alan-alda-plenary-session-flyer
Join us for an open interactive session on how to craft short and clear messages for technical material to non-scientists and the general public. Participants will practice clarity in speaking to non-scientists about their work and may be actively engaged in improvisation exercises or explaining scientific material to lay people.

Please refer to the event flyer for more information. If you have any additional questions, please contact Sonita Claiborne.


2016 WELLNESS FAIR
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 | 11 a.m.–3 p.m.
Eccles Student Life Center

f16-wellness-fair-box
Join Campus Recreation Services and the Center for Student Wellness for the annual Wellness Fair on Oct. 5! FREE flu shots and HIV/STD testing will be available (first come, first serve, with valid UCard) as well as free health screening, food samples, fitness classes and more. While you’re there, donate some food for our canned food drive and jump into the photobooth with your friends! We’ll be handing out free swag and prizes throughout the event.


UTAH-OXFORD STUDENT FORUM ON PEACE, CONFLICT AND HUMAN RIGHTS
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 | 12:15-1:45 p.m.
Honors College, MHC 1205

oxford2
The annual Utah-Oxford Student Forum on Peace, Conflict and Human Rights will take place on Oct. 5. The forum will focus on “Pragmatism and Vision in Building Peace: The Oxford Human Rights Consortium.” It will be held in the Honors College (MHC 1205) from 12:15 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Oxford Human Rights Consortium Director Cheyney Ryan and a panel of students will share their experiences at the Oxford workshops in March and June/July — which included a week in Belfast, where the students met with Northern Irish leaders who were instrumental in forging peace after decades of religious strife.

For more information, click here.


ISLAM AND FEMINISM – TEMPORARY MARRIAGE IN ISLAM: OBSOLETE OR CUTTING EDGE?
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 | 2-3 p.m.
Tanner Humanities Building, Childs Lecture Hall, Room 101

feminsim-in-islam-flyer
Dr. Iqbal will be presenting elements of her extensive research into the institution, history and practice of temporary marriage in Islam, with a critical evaluation through the lens of gender and Islamic sexual ethics.


CHILD AND FAMILY DEVELOPMENT CENTER OPEN HOUSE CELEBRATION
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 | 3-5 p.m.
Presidents Circle Plaza

child-and-family-development-center
Join us as we open our newly remodeled doors to the public! This event will include brief remarks from faculty and staff, a ribbon cutting, snacks, and a tour of the new facility.

For more information, go here.


SCIENCE EMPLOYER PANEL
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 |Panel 3-4 p.m., Networking 4-5 p.m.
Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building (ASB), Room 220

science-employer-panel
The Science Employer Panel brings students and professionals together for an in-depth discussion of the job prospects and internship opportunities available to science graduates. Students get direct access to insider information about a variety of science industries, while panelists get a chance to meet their future employees and share about why their business is a great place to work. Connections made at the Science Employer Panel start new careers, and help drive Utah’s economic engine

More information can be found here.


HOMECOMING FLAG FOOTBALL PASSING TOURNAMENT
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 | 4-9 p.m. (exact times will depend on number of registered teams)
*Registration closes October 3 @ 11:59 pm
University Federal Credit Union Playfield

im-f16-flag-football-tournament-box-2-2
Get in on the Utah Homecoming action and register today for the Homecoming Flag Football Passing Tournament. Register as a a full team or individual at imleagues.com/utah. Registration closes on Oct. 3, 2016, at 11:59 p.m.

Register here.

Tournament run time is an estimate. Final run time will be determined by the number of registered teams.

If you aren’t playing football, register for the Homecoming Cornhole Tournament and compete for some great prizes!

For complete rules, hover over the “Sport” icon on the left side of the Outdoor Soccer home page, then click on the “Handbook/Manuals” link. If you have any questions, email matt.mccarthy@crs.utah.edu.


HOMECOMING CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT
Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016 | 4-9 p.m. (exact times will depend on number of registered teams)
*Registration closes Oct. 3, 2016 at 11:59 p.m.
University Federal Credit Union Playfield

im-f16-cornhole-tournament-box
If you aren’t playing in the Homecoming Flag Football Tournament, join the Cornhole Tournament! We’ll be playing Cornhole for some great prizes on Wednesday, Oct. 5, 2016.

Register here today.


MEXICAN ARTIST PERFORMS BORDER PROJECT
Thursday, Oct. 6, 2016 | 7 p.m.
Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium, Utah Museum of Fine Arts

Guillermo Galindo, Angel Exterminador (wall gong), 2015, discarded old border wall section.

Guillermo Galindo, Angel Exterminador (wall gong), 2015, discarded old border
wall section.

Experimental composer Guillermo Galindo will give a live musical performance based on a project that involves fabricating musical instruments and graphic musical scores from items recovered at the U.S.-Mexico border. Thursday, Oct. 6, 7 p.m. Katherine W. and Ezekiel R. Dumke Jr. Auditorium, Utah Museum of Fine Arts. This event is free.

For more information, go here.


FOOD TRUCK ROUNDUP
Friday, Oct. 7, 2016 | 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Next to Health Sciences Education Building

food-truck-flyer
Buy lunch and benefit the Staff Council! A portion of your purchase will go toward providing staff scholarships. Enjoy the Melty Way, Taco Cartel, Chow, Real Danish and Saucy Skillet.


NEW TAX CLINIC
Friday, Oct. 7, 2016 | 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
S.J. Quinney College of Law

A new tax clinic at the S.J. Quinney College of Law aims to provide legal services to taxpayers who are low-income or speak English as a second language. The clinic will benefit law students by providing hands-on experience before graduation. The clinic will offer help with audits, appeals, collection matters, account problems and federal tax litigation. It also will provide education and advocacy. The services are free or low cost for eligible taxpayers.

For any questions, email taxclinic@law.utah.edu or 801-587-2439.


FACULTY CLUB SOCIAL
Friday, Oct. 7 | 5-7:30 p.m.
University Park Marriott Hotel

october-fc-invite3
Kick off fall break with the Faculty Club. Enjoy an Italian buffet dinner with beer and wine. Visit facultyclub.utah.edu for more information.


U5K NOW WELLU OPTION
Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016 | 8:30 a.m.

322 S. 1400 E. (Old Law School building)

U5k
For the first time, the annual Homecoming Scholarship 5K (U5K) will be a WellU option. This race is a great start to Homecoming Saturday and there will be lots of food and prizes.

Hope to see you there.


ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAK
Saturday, Oct. 8-15, 2016


alternative-spring-break
Spend your Fall break doing something that makes a difference! You can volunteer in one of several projects throughout the Western U.S. and Canada. You’ll change lives, including your own.


WEBER STATE VS UTAH HOCKEY
Friday, Oct. 14, 2016 | 8-10:30 p.m.
Salt Lake City Sports Complex

hockey
The Utes return home as they take on Weber State for the second time this season. Going into this year’s season, the Utes have won seven straight over the Wildcats, a streak that stretches back to 2013.


MAKING SENSE OF THE 2016 ELECTIONS
Monday, Oct. 17, 2016 | 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Union, Saltair Room

vote
The2016 presidential election has been unique in many respects, but like all presidential elections it has brought important political and societal issues to the forefront of our public dialogue. Join us as we discuss some of these important issues, hearing from scholars and practitioners in Utah and beyond.

For more information, go here.


SOCIAL SOUP PRESENTS: JULIE GUTHMAN – BEYOND MARKET-BASED ALTERNATIVES, TOWARD THE NEW FOOD ACTIVISM
Monday Oct. 17, 2016 | 12-1:30 p.m.
Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium

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Join us for a poignant conversation over a delicious, vegetarian bowl of soup. Social Soup is a unique opportunity to hear from distinctive speakers and to reflect on social, economic, and environmental issues surrounding food.

Julie Guthman’s lecture Beyond Market-based Alternatives, Toward the New Food Activism will explore the evolution food activism and the current political economy of food. Guthmann is in the Department of Community Services at the University of California at Santa Cruz. Her publications include two multi-award winning books: Agrarian Dreams: the Paradox of Organic Farming in California and Weighing In: Obesity, Food Justice, and the Limits of Capitalism.


EDIBLE CAMPUS GARDENS FALL HARVEST SOIREE
Oct. 21 | 2:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m.
Pioneer Garden east of Pioneer Theater

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Join us in a festive harvest and volunteer recognition celebration! Halloween costumes encouraged; A prize will be given to the best vegetable themed costume.

2-4 p.m. – Volunteer Session
Help us put the garden to bed, plant garlic, and remove tomatoes.
4-6 p.m. – Food, Celebration and thank yous
Recognize amazing volunteers and contributors
Celebrate the end of the season with treats and refreshments by El Sillero