A UTAH WARRIOR

In May, in front of national television cameras, 44-year old University of Utah chemistry professor Janis Louie, with two degrees and three children behind her, stared down the toughest obstacle course she’d faced yet: “American Ninja Warrior.”

Louie’s journey to the Ninja Warrior stage is a unique combination of athletic discipline, academic dedication and maternal devotion. All of her experiences combined, however, built the Janis Cantwell OKC Faraday flasksphysical and mental fortitude to take on such a daunting challenge and love the process. “How many times as adults do we get the opportunity to put ourselves in a really uncomfortable situation where you can grow from it?” she says.

Louie says she’s loved chemistry since high school. Before long, she was seeing chemistry everywhere. “Everything we touch and feel and smell, everything is chemistry,” she says. “That’s what really ignited my desire to pursue chemistry as a career.” She majored in chemistry at UCLA, and while her fellow chemistry majors were groaning and complaining about organic chemistry, Louie instead came to see “O-Chem” as an art, with many chemical pathways to arrive at the same result. As a graduate student at Yale University, Louie synthesized new chemical compounds. “Before me, this never existed, ever,” she says. “There’s something really spectacular with that feeling.”

Now her chemistry lab at the U focuses on developing better catalysts, compounds that facilitate chemical reactions. Many catalysts involve precious metals, such as palladium or platinum. Louie’s group hopes to achieve the same results with cheaper, more abundant metals like nickel or iron.

Parallel to her scientific career is a passion for athletics. “I started when I was a little girl. I was a gymnast,” she says. “That is the sport at heart for me.” Opportunities to pursue gymnastics diminish with age, however, so she shifted her focus to cheerleading while at UCLA and aerobics instruction while at Yale. After starting her research program, she started bodybuilding as well.

“The first time I was on stage I remember really enjoying the performance aspect,” she says. “When you teach, there’s an element of performance. You’re not just droning off. You want to perform for them. It’s a kind of performance I really enjoyed.” She also entered fitness competitions before taking a break from competition five years ago.

“I had triplets, which does a number on your body,” she says.

Triplets. They’re now five years old, but as babies they required a different set of parenting skills than babies that come one at a time. “What do you do when they are crying?” she says. “You pick them up. I can’t pick up all three at the same time, and there are times when all three are crying!” Even when crises aren’t all happening at once, Louie says that consistent scheduling was key to ensuring that she got some time to herself as well. “There’s no ambiguity. This is when we eat, this is when we play, this is when we sleep,” she says.

After the triplets, she still planned to stay in shape, but competing athletically wasn’t her top priority.

IMG_9835“And then ‘Ninja Warrior’ came along and it just looked like so much fun,” she says.

The audition process started with an online application form and a two to three minute video. Louie says the producers want to see your unique story and what makes you different. Louie’s profile as a chemistry professor and mother of triplets may have caught the producers’ eyes, because even though she didn’t complete the application due to an injury, the producers called her in January to see if she was still interested. After that call, Louie decided she needed to start training.

Much of her training involved typical strength and conditioning exercises, including pullups. The door frame of her office in the Henry Eyring Building was a convenient place to fit in a few extra pullups.

She also trained at Ninja Warehouse in Ogden, a gym owned by two-time “American Ninja Warrior” finalist Karson Voiles. The gym includes obstacles based on those seen in the show, and provided a perfect venue to prepare for the obstacles she’d face.

On May 13, Louie traveled to Oklahoma City for her run in front of the cameras. She had no idea ahead of time what challenges she’d face. “When you train in a gym, you gain some familiarity with particular obstacles,” she says. “When you compete, you’re seeing these obstacles for the first time and you’re not allowed to practice, you’re not allowed to touch them, until you walk up and it’s your run.” She and her fellow competitors could watch course testers and other competitors, however, giving her ideas of how to approach each obstacle.

Her training as a chemist helped her mentally prepare. In research, she says, only around 10 percent of reactions are successful; 90 percent aren’t. “Those are really bad odds,” she says. “We are gluttons for punishment.” But the experience of persisting through repeated setbacks built up her ability to shake off discouragement.

Louie wasn’t the only Utahn competing in Oklahoma City. Two, Brian Beckstrand and Jon Stewart, completed the course to advance to the next stage of competition. Louie got to know other competitors, including Allison Toepperwein, who later wrote on her blog that Louie is “a gorgeous mom of triplets, with a megawatt smile.”

Louie’s moment finally arrived. “You are uncomfortable,” she says. “There’s no real way to prepare for it such that you have no nerves. Any obstacle can take out anyone.” She cleared the first obstacle, the Floating Steps, but then had trouble hooking the rings on the second obstacle, where her run ended with a splash into the pool beneath the course. She didn’t appear as a competitor in the final cut of the episode, which aired June 20, but can be seen in the athlete waiting area.

“I had a great time,” she says. “It was a wonderful experience!” Her advice to other “Ninja Warrior” hopefuls? “Do it!” There are thousands of applications, and only a few hundred selected to compete. The odds are not in your favor, she says, but hundreds of thousands of others think it would be fun – but never get as far as the application. “The journey itself is worth it, even if you don’t get a call,” she says.

Her own takeaway from the experience, which she says she’d happily do again: “You’re never too old to try.”

 

Paul Gabrielsen is a senior science writer at University Marketing and Communications. If you have an interesting story idea, email him at paul.gabrielsen@utah.edu.

TAKING ACTION ON AIR QUALITY

By Ayrel Clark-Proffitt, campus engagement coordinator, University of Utah Sustainability Office

What’s your motivation? Why do you care about clean air?

No matter your reason, July is a great time to demonstrate your commitment to better air quality across Utah by participating in the Clear the Air Challenge, hosted by the Salt Lake Chamber of Commerce. This challenge encourages us to do our part by driving less and making lower-emission transportation

Ayrel Clark-Proffitt

Ayrel Clark-Proffitt

choices, such as riding the bus or TRAX, biking, walking, combining trips and carpooling. It also quantifies our impact: The challenge tracker shows how many pounds of emissions, gallons of gas and dollars you saved by making transportation decisions that avoid single-occupant vehicles on the road.

My reasons for caring about air quality — and taking action to improve it — are both professional and personal. I am the designated point person to encourage participation from the University of Utah team, which last year took first place overall. But the path that got me here is far more personal, and my motivation changes as my life changes.

As a child, I developed exercise-induced asthma, struggling through “suicide” drills in both basketball and soccer. As an adult, I moved out West, where dust and other particulates in the air exacerbated my asthma problems. I was hiking in South Mountain Park in Phoenix, and I saw a green cloud hovering over downtown right where I worked. That bad air propelled my decision to go back to school for public administration with a focus on environmental policies, which led to my career in sustainability.

Now, with a baby on the way, I worry about the impact of poor air quality on my unborn child. Will my baby have birth defects, developmental delays or respiratory ailments or asthma because of our air? In February of this year, our winter air quality reached some of its worst levels in years, and now that summer is here, I am concerned about the impact of ozone, a conglomerate of volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxide that forms on hot, sunny days. Cars and trucks, factories and global wildfires contribute to higher ozone levels, which can exacerbate asthma and cause lung damage. I am left wondering: How is this impacting my baby?

However, being involved in efforts like the Clear the Air Challenge and the Clean Air for U Challenge — the U’s February program to reduce pollution from vehicles — reduces my anxiety because it creates an opportunity to act and improve the air quality for everyone. Collectively, we can make a difference. Last year the University of Utah team logged approximately 11,000 nonsingle-occupant vehicle trips.

The Clear the Air Challenge is an excellent chance to do something to improve air quality and be a part of the solution. Take the challenge and see firsthand what an empowering experience it is to make a positive choice. Register at ClearTheAirChallenge.org to start tracking your contribution.

So, what is your motivation to help clear the air?

5 UINTA ADVENTURES TO COOL YOU OFF

By Andrew Thompson Landerghini, University Marketing and Communications

It’s hot. And it’s not going to cool off anytime soon. The dog days of summer have arrived early, but here are five Uinta adventures to beat the heat and escape the indoors. Some entail multiday backpacking excursions, while others are just day trips. Before you go, be prepared—pack food, water (a water filter for longer trips), good hiking boots, sunscreen and lots of bug spray. Depending on the destination, swim gear, fishing poles and camping gear would be a good idea, too. Have fun and stay cool!

Mirror Lake Highway

This is your starting point for Uinta fun. The Mirror Lake scenic byway winds through 42 miles of the Uinta-Wasatch-Cache National Forest with viewpoints, picnic areas and campgrounds along the way. The highway reaches its apex over Bald Mountain Pass at 10,687 feet and goes north all the way to Evanston, Wyo. To reach Mirror Lake Highway, aka Highway 150, and the rest of the Uintas head east on Interstate 80 and exit south on Highway 189. Take that to Highway 248 and go east to the town of Kamas. At Main Street, make a left and then a right on Center Street, which turns into the Mirror Lake Highway.

Mirror Lake Highway is the gateway to the Uintas as many of the area’s trailheads can be accessed from the road. If you’re looking for a short jaunt, check out the lake that is the highway’s namesake, Mirror Lake, at 10,050 feet and just off the road. Bring a picnic basket and enjoy the 2.9-mile loop around the lake. Three types of trout swim in the waters, so bring a fishing pole if you’re an angler.

Miles from campus to Highway 150: 39.9
Miles from campus to Mirror Lake: 70.4

Cataract Gorge

One of the many waterfalls at Cataract Gorge

PHOTO CREDIT: Michael Johnston/The Outbound Collective

One of the many waterfalls at Cataract Gorge

With dozens of waterfalls, a scenic creek (Little Deer) AND river (the Duchesne), a lake, and one of the finest swimming holes in the state, this place is perfect on a hot day. The area is fairly remote and high clearance vehicles are recommended to reach the trailhead. It is a 4-mile, out-and-back hike along Little Deer Creek to reach the gorge. If you like to rock climb, bring your gear.

Miles from campus to trailhead: 62.4

Ibantik Lake

Ibantik Lake with Notch Peak in the background.

PHOTO CREDIT: Colton Marsala/The Outbound Collective

Ibantik Lake with Notch Peak in the background.

This hike has two trailheads, Crystal Lake, which is nearer and more direct, and Bald Mountain, which is more scenic (though everything out here scores high on the scenery scale) and less trafficked. Ideally, work out a shuttle system so you can go from one trailhead to the other. Doing that the hike measures at 9.5 miles (4 miles from Crystal Lake, 5.5 from Bald Mountain) and you’ll pass a half dozen or so lakes. Regardless the route, be sure to climb Notch Pass, where a family of mountain goats reside. And please don’t feed the animals.

Miles from campus to Crystal Lake trailhead: 66

Amethyst Basin

Amethyst Basin

PHOTO CREDIT: Connor Barry/The Outbound Collective

Amethyst Basin

This 13-mile round tripper is as photogenic as they get, making it a classic Uinta hike. It can be achieved in one long day though many opt to spend the night at Amethyst Lake with Ostler Peak as the backdrop. The Amethyst Basin trail begins at the Christmas Meadows Campground and winds its way up past glorious waterfalls for a total gain of 1,900 feet in elevation. Once you reach lake, and if you’re staying the night, break out the fishing pole as Amethyst Lake is well-populated and the cutthroat trout are hungry.

Miles from campus to trailhead: 88.3

Kings Peak

The perspective atop Kings Peak

PHOTO CREDIT: Alex Leopardi

The perspective atop Kings Peak

This summit is aptly named as it is the tallest peak in Utah, measuring in at 13,528 feet. However, Kings Peak was not named because of its supremacy in height, but after the first director of the U.S. Geological Survey, Clarence King. While there are multiple approaches to Kings Peak, the most common is from the Henrys Fork Campground, where it’s a 28.8 mile out-and-back hike to Utah’s “crown point.” Give yourself a few days to bag the state’s most prominent peak.

Miles from campus to the Henrys Fork Campground trailhead: 153

So there you have it, five adventures to beat the heat. Before embarking, do your research and be prepared. After all, the Uinta wilderness can be wild. For any and all outdoor rental needs, check out Outdoor Adventures at the Student Life Center.

NITRO WORLD GAMES

By Annalisa Purser

The Rice-Eccles Stadium is ready to debut its new distributed sound system and video scoreboard at the inaugural Nitro World Games, Saturday, July 16, 5 p.m. Tickets for the event are available here.

The Nitro World Games was created by extreme sports icon Travis Pastrana with Nitro Circus and CEO and Creative Director Michael Porra, to highlight the best action sports athletes from across the globe, including freestyle motocross (FMX), BMX, skate, inline, scooter and more.

Nitro Circus was created by Pastrana in Salt Lake City, making the stadium a natural place to introduce the Nitro World Games. The three-hour event will air live in the U.S. on NBC during prime time.

Upgrades to the sound and video board began this past fall and will provide fans with a more enjoyable experience, while also reducing the noise disturbance to the surrounding community.

“Guests at the Nitro World Games will be the first to experience the upgrades to the Stadium,” said Aaron White, associate director of operations for Stadium and Arena Event Services. “These updates provide a surround-sound and high-definition viewing experience that today’s fans expect.”

Owls at stadium 3The stadium now has inward-facing speakers along its perimeter, directing sound toward the center of the bowl rather than sending it across the stadium. The new screen replaced a board that was more than 10 years old and was difficult and expensive to maintain.

While these upgrades were under construction, facilities contractors were busy updating the exterior of the Stadium by sandblasting, repainting and repairing some areas of the exposed steel. During the project, they noticed a great horned owl nest in the beams. The U’s Wildlife Society and Utah Hawk Watch helped secure the area so the owlets would be undisturbed before they were ready to leave the nest. This delayed the project for a few weeks, but the exterior is now complete, and the owls have been seen flying around the Mount Olivet Cemetery.

“We are excited for our fans, including our feathered friends, to enjoy the new sound and viewing experience at the Nitro World Games and at all future events.” White said.

The scoreboard and speaker update cost $13.5 million and was funded by Utah Athletics and Auxiliary Services. No state funds were used for the project.

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COMPASSION AND UNIVERSAL RESPONSIBILITY

By Suzanne Young, public relations and marketing manager, University of Utah Health Sciences

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama’s long-awaited visit to Utah was received by a full house at the Jon M. Huntsman Center on Tuesday, June 21 2016. After canceling his scheduled visit to Utah in October 2015 because of health reasons, many feared the visit would never happen but he arrived with a moving message that motivated and inspired the thousands who came to look inside themselves to spark change.

As the Dalai Lama slowly mounted the stairs to the stage, the crowd stood and watched in reverence. He greeted everyone with a smile and wave. After accepting the University of Utah Presidential Medal from President David W. Pershing, he sat down adorned in U logo hat ready to address the masses. A brief Q&A preceded the main address, which covered two key topics: compassion and universal responsibility.

Dalai Lama 2016He started with a message of seeking ways to find common ground across all humanity. “We are all equal and have the same desires,” he said. “Everyone on this planet of 7 billion people desires and has the right to desire peace and happiness.”

Leaning forward in his chair, he asked, “Who destroys peace and creates violence?” His answer was simple- not God, but us. He implored listeners to take responsibility, solve problems without violence and restore peace where it has been lost. He emphasized our ability to act and reminded us that peace does not just happen; rather, it is a result of peoples’ actions. “If we do not make an effort, the century will continue with suffering and bloodshed.”

He said one way to promote peace is to adopt a new way of thinking. “We live in a global economy. To be globally minded is to have a sense of unity and oneness. Serve other human beings and promote a sense of concern for others.”

The Dalai Lama recalled an experience where he was on the receiving end of this philosophy. In 1959 he was forced to flee Tibet and found refuge in India. The Indian prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, offered immense help and sympathy for him and his some 7 million followers. Together, Nehru and the Dalai Lama focused their efforts on helping Tibetans become self-sustaining, find homes and develop educational opportunities for misplaced children. He said his experience receiving such tremendous compassion helped preserve the wonderful traditions of Buddhism and Tibetan culture.

He is also a big believer in science, which he said offers hope. “I work with scientists about basic human nature,” he told the crowd, “and they say that compassion is our basic human nature.” He promised that compassion in oneself leads to a happy family, which leads to a happy community. “That is real hope.”

Real hope led him to find inner strength to deal with some of his hardest trials like losing his freedom at 16 and his country at 24. During the course of 81 years he has seen and faced countless difficulties, essentially from man’s own creation, he said. However, no matter the challenge, he holds fast to hope. “People who give up hope are never the recipient of success.”

Even in times of darkness, the Dalai Lama manages to find light. While exiled in India, he recognized the strengths in the heritage of the Tibetan people. He addressed the Tibetan people in their native tongue about their 2,000-year history and the opportunities they have to show resilience. “This critical period has given us an opportunity to demonstrate the strength and resilience of our people. We must remember this.”

As the address came to an end, the Dalai Lama slowly surveyed the crowd of over 9,000 and offered his last piece of counsel: “The change of humanity over centuries starts first with one individual. The spirit of compassion can spread to different parts of the world by the work of just one person.”

The $94,000 in proceeds from the event will be donated to Primary Children’s Hospital, Utah homeless services, the preservation of Utah Tibetan culture and the preservation of Tibetan culture through the Dalai Lama’s charitable trust.

PARTNERS IN THE PARK

By Annalisa Purser

University Neighborhood Partners at the University of Utah celebrates the college graduation of 296 west Salt Lake residents at its first Partners in the Park event of the season — June 21, 6 p.m., at Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West.

Partners in the Park is an annual event series for west Salt Lake residents that includes a free picnic dinner, crafts, raffles, music, face painting and information tables to connect residents with university departments and community organizations.

Partners in the Park is an annual event series for west Salt Lake residents that includes a free picnic dinner, crafts, raffles, music, face painting and information tables to connect residents with university departments and community organizations.

University Neighborhood Partners began in 2001 to connect west Salt Lake residents with higher education in mutually beneficial partnerships — providing opportunities to residents and insights and experience to researchers and students. This year celebrates the largest group of U and Salt Lake Community College graduates from the area since UNP began.

Partners in the Park is an annual event series for west Salt Lake residents that includes a free picnic dinner, crafts, raffles, music, face painting and information tables to connect residents with university departments and community organizations. At the kick-off event, 10 scholarships will be awarded, with most going to current or past residents of west Salt Lake City who are high school seniors, have earned a GED diploma, are freshmen undergraduate students or students transferring from a community college to a four-year institution, and who have been involved with UNP partnerships or volunteered with UNP or other west side community partners.

Nearly all of the recipients are first-generation college students, and many are immigrants or from refugee backgrounds.

“While the total population of the area hasn’t grown dramatically since UNP began, the number of college graduates from the U has increased from 23 in 2001 to 192 in 2016,” said Sarah Munro, director of UNP. “Having graduates in the community who are role models to the next generation is invaluable.”

The five-week Partners in the Park program schedule follows:

  • June 21, Jordan Park, 1060 S. 900 West, 6-8 p.m.
  • June 28, Sherwood Park, 1400 W. 400 South, 6-8 p.m.
  • July 12, Poplar Grove Park, 800 S. Emery Street, 6-8 p.m.
  • July 26, Rose Park Elementary, 1105 W. 1000 North, 6-8 p.m.
  • 2, Northwest Recreation Center, 1255 W. Clark Avenue (300 N.), 6-8 p.m.

Scholarship recipients include:

Jelani Aboud Athumani fled Somalia with his family as a child and began his education at a rural primary school in Kenya. His inspiring educational journey took him first to the University of Nairobi where he earned a bachelor’s degree in education, and then Malaysia to pursue a master’s degree in educational management and leadership. This was interrupted when he received an immigrant visa to join his wife in the U.S. He is now a graduate student at the U and serves the community by working as a mentor at the Somali Youth Center, serving as a board member of the East African Refugee Goat project, helping to facilitate the UNP Hartland Youth Leadership Group, working as a teaching assistant at the U and more.

Enoabasi Aniekan Etokidem immigrated from Nigeria to the U.S. at the age of 7 and grew up in New York City. In spite of numerous financial and emotional hurdles, she is on her way to becoming a pediatric oncologist. She plans to graduate from the U with a bachelor’s degree in health society and policy with minors in chemistry and integrative human biology and then go on to the U’s School of Medicine. In addition to demanding work in pediatric lab and as a nursing assistant, she is also a volunteer for the Road Home and the Maliheh Free Clinic and holds a variety of student leadership positions. Her long-term goal is to return to Nigeria, where she will establish education and health programs in rural areas.

Yessenia Tomasa Sontay was inspired by her parents to take education seriously and graduated from Highland High School with a 3.8 GPA. She is currently working toward a degree in elementary education with a minor in sociology from the U. She hopes to continue on to receive a master’s degree in educational leadership and policy or a doctoral degree in order to become a professor. She joined the Beacon Scholars program at the U during her freshman year and continues to be involved in her community. She is an after school leader at Glendale Middle School, where she works with sixth graders and is one of the founders of Utah Dreamers Advising Corps, which advises and empowers undocumented students.

Cristian Cortes will begin attending the U in the fall as a business major. He excelled in high school and was involved in AVID and the Clemente program, as well as many extracurricular activities. During his senior year, he was East High’s student representative to the Salt Lake City School District executive board and developed leadership skills that he hopes will help him inspire other undocumented students.

Regina Wesseh came to the U.S. at age 8 after living in a refugee camp in Liberia for several years. She began school unable to speak English, but was determined to get an education because her mother never had that opportunity. She will soon become a mother herself. She graduated from East High in the spring and plans to attend Salt Lake Community College in the fall. During high school, she participated in a variety of sports and clubs. She was vice president of the Imani Club, where she helped fundraise and plan events. She has also been very involved with the UNP Hartland youth center as part of the Youth Leadership Group and the dance program. She helped teach younger students to dance and has performed many times in the community, including at Partners in the Park.

Though she was only 3 years old at the time, Itzel Berenice Nava still remembers crossing the desert to leave Mexico with her family. As a student at East High School, she challenged herself by participating in AVID and taking many advanced placement classes. She is a member of Mestizo Arts and Activism, a volunteer coach for the Utah Development Academy’s futbolito season and a volunteer for Big Brothers Big Sisters. She will attend the U in the fall in pursuit of a career in social work or social justice.

Jasmine Consuelo Montoya was inspired by her mother to become a volunteer in the community at a young age and has already made a significant impact. She has been most involved at Mountain View Elementary and Glendale Middle School, where she has helped with days of service, helped younger students with homework, taught cooking classes and served as a teacher’s assistant. She will fulfill her dream to be the first in her family to attend college in the fall when she begins classes at Salt Lake Community College. She hopes to pursue a career in social work.

Dulce Cecilia Hernandez recently graduated from West High School and will attend Salt Lake Community College in the fall. She has a passion for working on cars and aspires to become a leading female technician after earning a degree in automotive technology. She has volunteered at Partners in the Park for the past six years and serves 20 hours per week as a community builder for NeighborWorks Salt Lake, helping to make her community safer and more beautiful.

Bettsy Harely Romo enrolled in concurrent classes at Salt Lake Community College while a student at East High School. This fall she will begin classes at the U, where she will major in biochemistry with the goal of becoming a pediatrician. In addition to her studies, she has volunteered at Neighborhood House and Glendale Middle School and is vice president of a club that promotes community service in the Latino community.

Ana Jenny Fernandez challenged herself academically during high school by participating in AVID, Clemente and many advanced placement classes at East High School. She also challenged herself in other ways, lettering in debate and joining the wrestling team, where she was the only girl. In addition to excelling in school, she volunteers for Comunidades Unidas with her mother and has participated in many Partners in the Park events. She plans to attend the U in the fall, where she will major in communication in order to prepare for a career in law.

 

Annalisa Purser is a communications specialist at University Marketing and Communications. If you have an interesting story idea, email her at annalisa.purser@utah.edu.

Announcements

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CTLE: Order student feedback surveys and annual teaching symposium announced
Master of Public Administration highly ranked by Value Colleges
2016 University Innovation & Impact Award winners

Act now: USHIP (SendSuite Desktop) will be turned off permanently on June 30, 2016
AHA heart walk t-shirt design contest


CENTER FOR TEACHING & LEARNING EXCELLENCE


ATS Home Image

Schedule your mid-semester student feedback surveys now through July 5.

Classes:

Teaching in Higher Education (CTLE 600/6000-001)

This course will help you develop the basic pedagogical knowledge and skills necessary to succeed as an instructor in a higher education setting.

Cyber Pedagogy (CTLE 651/6510-090)

This course explores principles of online learning; instructional technology best practices, and provides participants with the opportunity to experiment with designing their own online strategies, techniques and approaches.

Save the date for the Annual Teaching Symposium – Monday, Aug. 15, 2016. Online registration begins July 11, 2016.


MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION HIGHLY RANKED BY VALUE COLLEGES


Master-of-Public-Administration_horiz

Master of Public Administration at the U has been ranked No. 4 by Value Colleges 2016. The list includes the top 50 NASPAA accredited MPA programs in the United States.

The MPA program, founded in 1976 is a multidisciplinary plan administered through the Department of Political Science. This allows students and researchers to freely pursue their interests within the context of public administration. At less than $300 per credit hour, the U’s model MPA program is a top value for its students.

Value Colleges ranked institutions by using three metrics:

  • Average starting salary for graduates
  • Annual cost
  • S. News & World Report

The Value Colleges website cites that, “According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, public servants with a master’s degree stand to make more than $12, 000 per year over their colleagues with only an undergraduate degree.” Another incentive to apply to the MPA program is the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, a new federal program that forgives loans after 10 years of work in the public service.

Other Pac 12 schools that made the list are: No. 5, Arizona State University, No. 20, University of Washington, and No. 24, University of Arizona.

The MPA program was also selected for the 2016 Best of Salt Lake City Award in the Education category by the Salt Lake City Award Program.


UNIVERSITY INNOVATION & IMPACT AWARD WINNERS 2016


winner-graphic
The University of Utah announced the winners of the sixth annual Distinguished Innovation and Impact Award recently. The award recognizes faculty who create products and initiatives with potential to change the world and improve lives.

This year’s winners are: Jim Agutter, assistant professor of design; Dana Carroll, professor of biochemistry; and Baldomero (Toto) Olivera, professor of biology. Follow the link below to read more and watch videos about the winners.

Learn more about the recipients and watch videos about them here.


ACT NOW: USHIP (SENDSUITE DESKTOP) WILL BE TURNED OFF PERMANENTLY ON JUNE 30, 2016


iStock_000081558465_Small
University Print & Mail Services is nearing the completion of the migrating from its old shipping system, SendSuite Desktop (USHIP), to SendSuite Live, an updated version of USHIP that is browser based and more user-friendly.

In addition to facilitating FedEx and UPS shipping services, SendSuite Live offers a streamlined interface, incorporating U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and Express Mail (deliverable to P.O. boxes) services, as well as Certified Mail options (listed as ERR in the application).

The SendSuite Live shipping application allows campus users to shop UPS, FedEx and USPS in one single interface and ensures that users are getting the university’s contracted rates which, in some instances, can yield savings of up to 65 percent off retail rates.

SendSuite Desktop will be turned off permanently on June 30, 2016. Act now to avoid a disruption in service and get acquainted with SendSuite Live and its expanded capabilities.

Please contact Suzann Hansen at 801-582-7215; Suzann.hansen@utah.edu or Wendy Covert at 801-585-7459; Wendy.covert@utah.edu for assistance with the SendSuite Live transition.


AHA HEART WALK T-SHIRT DESIGN CONTEST


HeartStroke-Walk_2016
Help Us Design Our next UUHC Heart Walk T-Shirt!

Win a cash incentive and have your design on the UUHC T-shirts for the American Heart Association Heart Walk this year.

Entry instructions:

  • AHA’s mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke — the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers.  Think of creative ways to include their mission in your design.
  • Every entry must be a digital file in jpg, png, pdf or eps file format. The resolution should not be less than 300 dpi.
  • Each entry must be of ORIGINAL design and may not contain any photos and/or artwork that has been altered or modified.  The entry must not infringe on the rights of any third party.
  • Each entry is due by 11:59 p.m. Friday, June 24, 2016.   Please submit your entry along with your name, phone number and email address to: Autumn Allen at allen@hsc.utah.edu.

Voting

  • Voting on the entries will take place at the team captains meeting on June 30.
  • AHA Heart walk Team captains will vote to select the top five finalists.
  • The top five entries will move to the final round and the UUHC Heart Walk Leadership will determine the first, second and third place winners on July 1.
  • The first prize entrant will receive acknowledgement by UUHC|AHA Executive Leaders.  Plus they will have their design on all of the UUHC Heart Walk T-shirts. If winner is a current employee they will receive a cash incentive of $100 to be added to their next paycheck (winner is responsible for taxes associated with prize). If winner is not a current employee you will receive a gift card or other form of prize equal to $100.

Official rules

  • The UUHC | AHA Heart Walk Contest Design a T-Shirt Contest is open to eligible participants who are registered for the 2016 AHA Heart & Stroke Walk. By participating in this contest, participants agree to be bound by the Official Rules of this contest.  Taxes on prizes are solely the responsibility of the winner.

 

Student Life

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Master of Public Administration highly ranked by Value Colleges
2016 University Innovation & Impact Award winners

Act now: USHIP (SendSuite Desktop) will be turned off permanently on June 30, 2016
AHA heart walk t-shirt design contest


MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION HIGHLY RANKED BY VALUE COLLEGES


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Master of Public Administration at the U has been ranked No. 4 by Value Colleges 2016. The list includes the top 50 NASPAA accredited MPA programs in the United States.

The MPA program, founded in 1976 is a multidisciplinary plan administered through the Department of Political Science. This allows students and researchers to freely pursue their interests within the context of public administration. At less than $300 per credit hour, the U’s model MPA program is a top value for its students.

Value Colleges ranked institutions by using three metrics:

  • Average starting salary for graduates
  • Annual cost
  • S. News & World Report

The Value Colleges website cites that, “According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, public servants with a master’s degree stand to make more than $12, 000 per year over their colleagues with only an undergraduate degree.” Another incentive to apply to the MPA program is the Public Service Loan Forgiveness program, a new federal program that forgives loans after 10 years of work in the public service.

Other Pac 12 schools that made the list are: No. 5, Arizona State University, No. 20, University of Washington, and No. 24, University of Arizona.

The MPA program was also selected for the 2016 Best of Salt Lake City Award in the Education category by the Salt Lake City Award Program.


UNIVERSITY INNOVATION & IMPACT AWARD WINNERS 2016


winner-graphic
The University of Utah announced the winners of the sixth annual Distinguished Innovation and Impact Award recently. The award recognizes faculty who create products and initiatives with potential to change the world and improve lives.

This year’s winners are: Jim Agutter, assistant professor of design; Dana Carroll, professor of biochemistry; and Baldomero (Toto) Olivera, professor of biology. Follow the link below to read more and watch videos about the winners.

Learn more about the recipients and watch videos about them here.


ACT NOW: USHIP (SENDSUITE DESKTOP) WILL BE TURNED OFF PERMANENTLY ON JUNE 30, 2016


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University Print & Mail Services is nearing the completion of the migrating from its old shipping system, SendSuite Desktop (USHIP), to SendSuite Live, an updated version of USHIP that is browser based and more user-friendly.

In addition to facilitating FedEx and UPS shipping services, SendSuite Live offers a streamlined interface, incorporating U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and Express Mail (deliverable to P.O. boxes) services, as well as Certified Mail options (listed as ERR in the application).

The SendSuite Live shipping application allows campus users to shop UPS, FedEx and USPS in one single interface and ensures that users are getting the university’s contracted rates which, in some instances, can yield savings of up to 65 percent off retail rates.

SendSuite Desktop will be turned off permanently on June 30, 2016. Act now to avoid a disruption in service and get acquainted with SendSuite Live and its expanded capabilities.

Please contact Suzann Hansen at 801-582-7215; Suzann.hansen@utah.edu or Wendy Covert at 801-585-7459; Wendy.covert@utah.edu for assistance with the SendSuite Live transition.


AHA HEART WALK T-SHIRT DESIGN CONTEST


HeartStroke-Walk_2016
Help Us Design Our next UUHC Heart Walk T-Shirt!

Win a cash incentive and have your design on the UUHC T-shirts for the American Heart Association Heart Walk this year.

Entry instructions:

  • AHA’s mission is to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke — the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers. Think of creative ways to include their mission in your design.
  • Every entry must be a digital file in jpg, png, pdf or eps file format. The resolution should not be less than 300 dpi.
  • Each entry must be of ORIGINAL design and may not contain any photos and/or artwork that has been altered or modified. The entry must not infringe on the rights of any third party.
  • Each entry is due by 11:59 p.m. Friday, June 24, 2016. Please submit your entry along with your name, phone number and email address to: Autumn Allen at allen@hsc.utah.edu.

Voting

  • Voting on the entries will take place at the team captains meeting on June 30.
  • AHA Heart walk Team captains will vote to select the top five finalists.
  • The top five entries will move to the final round and the UUHC Heart Walk Leadership will determine the first, second and third place winners on July 1.
  • The first prize entrant will receive acknowledgement by UUHC|AHA Executive Leaders. Plus they will have their design on all of the UUHC Heart Walk T-shirts. If winner is a current employee they will receive a cash incentive of $100 to be added to their next paycheck (winner is responsible for taxes associated with prize). If winner is not a current employee you will receive a gift card or other form of prize equal to $100.

Official rules

  • The UUHC | AHA Heart Walk Contest Design a T-Shirt Contest is open to eligible participants who are registered for the 2016 AHA Heart & Stroke Walk. By participating in this contest, participants agree to be bound by the Official Rules of this contest. Taxes on prizes are solely the responsibility of the winner.

 

Highlighted Events

U CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASS FEATURING MATTHEW ZALKIND
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 | 12:45-2:30 p.m.
Dumke Recital Hall


Matthew Zalkind
Join the U chamber music class featuring Matthew Zalkind.


FREE YOGA CLASSES
Begins Wednesday, May 25-Wednesday, July 27 on Wednesdays | 12-1 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library

yoga-flyer-300x212
Join us for free yoga on Wednesdays, 12-1p.m., in room 205 (History of Medicine Room), at the Eccles Health Sciences Library. Please bring your own mat.

This 10 week yoga series will begin on May 25 and end on July 27. Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events.

This is a great opportunity to stretch and relax during the workday.

A student from Yoga Assets will lead us through yoga poses. Yoga Assets provides yoga teacher training in Salt Lake City. These events will enable a Yoga Assets student to fulfill their required volunteer hours for their yoga teacher certification.

Please send us feedback about this event. If well received, we plan to offer free drop-in yoga sessions on a regular basis.

WellU and WellnessNow credit may be available to participants.


STAR PARTY
Wednesday, June 28, 2016 | 8-10 p.m.
Physics Building


Star Party
Come view the night sky through the Dept. Physics and Astronomy’s Observatory. We’ll show you the planets, stars, galaxies, clusters and nebulae from an on campus location. The South Physics Observatory is open to all ages. The opening times change throughout the year depending on sunset so check our webpage for current opening times.

Star parties usually last for two hours or more and are outside, so dress appropriately.


GENOME: UNLOCKING LIFE’S CODE
Saturday, May 21-Monday, Sept. 5, 2016 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah

GENOME-001_0
Do you have your mother’s dimples or your father’s hairline? Explore how your genome is a complete set of instructions that makes you, you. Learn how this road map can help you trace your ancestral past and help you take charge of your future health.

For more information, go here.


WHAT IS HOME?
Ongoing through Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016
Marriott Library, Level three


Home
And when do houses become them? Is it how long we’ve lived there? The kinds of memories we’ve made there? Is it the people that live there?

Salt Lake Valley Habitat for Humanity partners with families to build homes that they can afford. Just like the process of building a Habitat home, the “What is Home” exhibit is an example of what happens when people come together to create something on behalf of others.

Campus Events

U CHAMBER MUSIC MASTER CLASS FEATURING MATTHEW ZALKIND
Tuesday, June 28, 2016 | 12:45-2:30 p.m.
Dumke Recital Hall


Matthew Zalkind
Join the U chamber music class featuring Matthew Zalkind.


FREE YOGA CLASSES
Begins Wednesday, May 25-Wednesday, July 27 on Wednesdays | 12-1 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library

yoga-flyer-300x212
Join us for free yoga on Wednesdays, 12-1p.m., in room 205 (History of Medicine Room), at the Eccles Health Sciences Library. Please bring your own mat.

This 10 week yoga series will begin on May 25 and end on July 27. Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events.

This is a great opportunity to stretch and relax during the workday.

A student from Yoga Assets will lead us through yoga poses. Yoga Assets provides yoga teacher training in Salt Lake City. These events will enable a Yoga Assets student to fulfill their required volunteer hours for their yoga teacher certification.

Please send us feedback about this event. If well received, we plan to offer free drop-in yoga sessions on a regular basis.

WellU and WellnessNow credit may be available to participants.


STAR PARTY
Wednesday, June 28, 2016 | 8-10 p.m.
Physics Building


Star Party
Come view the night sky through the Dept. Physics and Astronomy’s Observatory. We’ll show you the planets, stars, galaxies, clusters and nebulae from an on campus location. The South Physics Observatory is open to all ages. The opening times change throughout the year depending on sunset so check our webpage for current opening times.

Star parties usually last for two hours or more and are outside, so dress appropriately.


GENOME: UNLOCKING LIFE’S CODE
Saturday, May 21-Monday, Sept. 5, 2016 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah

GENOME-001_0
Do you have your mother’s dimples or your father’s hairline? Explore how your genome is a complete set of instructions that makes you, you. Learn how this road map can help you trace your ancestral past and help you take charge of your future health.

For more information, go here.


WHAT IS HOME?
Ongoing through Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016
Marriott Library, Level three


Home
And when do houses become them? Is it how long we’ve lived there? The kinds of memories we’ve made there? Is it the people that live there?

Salt Lake Valley Habitat for Humanity partners with families to build homes that they can afford. Just like the process of building a Habitat home, the “What is Home” exhibit is an example of what happens when people come together to create something on behalf of others.