HUGE LANDSLIDE SHAPED ZION NATIONAL PARK

By Lee J. Siegel

A Utah mountainside collapsed 4,800 years ago in a gargantuan landslide known as a “rock avalanche,” creating the flat floor of what is now Zion National Park by damming the Virgin River to create a lake that existed for 700 years.

This animated computer simulation of the Sentinel rock-avalanche landslide in Utah's Zion Canyon 4,800 years ago provides a perspective view showing the surface topography of the landslide as it occurred.

PHOTO CREDIT: Jeff Moore, University of Utah

This animated computer simulation of the Sentinel rock-avalanche landslide in Utah’s Zion Canyon 4,800 years ago provides a perspective view showing the surface topography of the landslide as it occurred.

Those are key conclusions of a new University of Utah study that provides the first definitive date for the landslide and estimates its size and dynamics, including a speed likely as fast as 180 mph. The study of the slide was published today and featured on the cover of the June issue of the Geological Society of America’s journal GSA Today.

The ancient Zion landslide would cover New York City’s Central Park with 275 feet of debris,” says Jeff Moore, the new study’s senior author and an assistant professor of geology and geophysics at the University of Utah. “And you would need 90 times the volume of concrete in Hoover Dam to recreate the mountainside that failed.”

The Sentinel rock avalanche also “would bury Salt Lake City’s Liberty Park 2,340 feet deep, which is almost a half mile,” Moore adds.

The huge landslide had a volume of 286 million cubic meters or 10.1 billion cubic feet – 4.4 times bigger than Utah’s 2013 Bingham Canyon copper mine landslide, one of North America’s largest historic, nonvolcanic landslides, with a volume of 65 million cubic meters or 2.3 billion cubic feet.

The Sentinel, at 7,157 feet elevation on the west side of Zion Canyon, was bigger before the slide 4,800 years ago, “but a large portion of it is now gone,” Moore says.

Computer simulations matched known landslide deposits and show the huge slide rushed southeast across Zion Canyon in about 20 seconds, with an average speed of 112 mph and a peak speed of 180 to 200 mph. “It was certainly moving more than 150 mph when the huge wall and peak crashed down,” Moore says. Then, for 30 more seconds, the slide debris spread up and down Zion Canyon. “By a minute it was pretty much done.”

“The original deposit was 2 miles long and just under a mile wide,” with a maximum thickness of 650 feet and average thickness of 310 feet, he says, adding the landslide’s lower end is at the road junction “right at the mouth of Zion Canyon.”

“This catastrophic landslide of massive proportions had two effects,” he says. “One was constructive – creating paradise through cataclysm. More than 3.6 million people last year enjoyed the flat and tranquil valley floor of Zion Canyon, which owes its existence to this landslide. The other aspect is the extreme hazard that a similar event would pose if it happened today.”

Moore says that “within the relatively small confines of Zion National Park, there is evidence for several deposits of large valley-blocking landslides,” two within the past 5,000 years or so: The Sentinel slide and another, about one-fifth as big, in Hop Valley in the northern part of the park some 2,600 years ago.

Despite such severe, large prehistoric landslides, they are extremely infrequent and “we have no evidence that something like this is imminent,” Moore says.

The 4,800-year-old landslide deposit still produces many smaller slides, including one in 1995 that damaged the road between the visitor center and the lodge, Moore says.

Dating a disaster

Volunteer Scott Castleton and University of Utah geologist Jeff Moore collect rock samples from boulders for a new study that provides the first direct date – 4,800 years ago – for a a gargantuan landslide in what is now Zion National Park, Utah.

PHOTO CREDIT: Jessica Castleton, University of Utah

Volunteer Scott Castleton and University of Utah geologist Jeff Moore collect rock samples from boulders for a new study that provides the first direct date – 4,800 years ago – for a a gargantuan landslide in what is now Zion National Park, Utah.

Moore defines a rock avalanche as “a very large failure of a solid-rock slope – as opposed to soil – with characteristic very fast, long and flowlike movement. Because of their large volume, they are relatively rare.” Both the Sentinel and Bingham Canyon slides were rock avalanches.

Some people initially thought Zion Canyon was flat because of glacial debris, like Yosemite Valley in California. It is unclear when the Sentinel landslide was discovered, but it first was described in a scientific paper in 1945.

“We have conducted a rigorous and complete analysis of this landslide for the first time,” Moore says. The study concluded the landslide most likely happened 4,800 years ago as single event, with a range of uncertainty so that it could have happened as early as 5,200 years ago or as recently as 4,400 years ago.

The method exploits the fact that after a landslide, boulders atop the slide have surfaces exposed to the sky for the first time. Particles from incoming cosmic rays begin to hit the boulder surfaces, creating beryllium-10. The longer a boulder is exposed, the greater the amount of beryllium-10, allowing scientists to determine when the boulder’s surface first was exposed by the landslide.

With permission from the National Park Service, Moore and colleagues sampled 12 boulders from the landslide’s surface, crushed the notebook-sized rock samples and analyzed their beryllium-10 content.

Moore says previous estimates of the landslide’s date were from indirect methods, including radiocarbon dating of lake sediments that gave ages of 3,900 and 4,300 years. Another study estimated the slide was 7,900 years old.

Scientists don’t know what caused the giant landside. “We found no evidence indicating there was an ancient earthquake at the time, but there’s not a detailed record of paleoearthquakes in the Zion area,” Moore says. “Rock avalanches frequently occur with an earthquake trigger but just as often occur with no apparent trigger at all.”

The collapsed peak included sandstones from the Navajo and Kayenta formations, and the latter includes some weak shale layers that might have aided the slide.

Zion Lodge site once underwater

This Google Earth aerial image of Zion Canyon shows the location of a huge rock-avalanche landslide that collapsed off a peak named the Sentinel 4,800 years ago, dammed the Virgin River and created a lake that lasted 700 years until it filled with sediment, producing the flat, cottonwood-dotted canyon floor enjoyed today by millions of visitors to Zion National Park in Utah. The orange line above the slide shows where part of the Sentinel collapsed to generate the slide. A University of Utah study provides the first direct date for the slide and details of its size and speed.

PHOTO CREDIT: Jeff Moore, University of Utah

This Google Earth aerial image of Zion Canyon shows the location of a huge rock-avalanche landslide that collapsed off a peak named the Sentinel 4,800 years ago, dammed the Virgin River and created a lake that lasted 700 years until it filled with sediment, producing the flat, cottonwood-dotted canyon floor enjoyed today by millions of visitors to Zion National Park in Utah. The orange line above the slide shows where part of the Sentinel collapsed to generate the slide. A University of Utah study provides the first direct date for the slide and details of its size and speed.

To determine the rock avalanche’s volume of 286 million cubic meters, Moore and colleagues used a computer and “our best geological judgment to recreate what the canyon looked like before the slide.” In a similar way, they then reconstructed the top surface of the landslide before it began to erode.

The landslide dammed the Virgin River, and “there was a lake in Zion Canyon for approximately 700 years,” Moore says.

He calculates that if the river’s discharge was similar to today’s, it would have taken five to 10 years for the lake to fill. The long, narrow lake covered 2.4 square miles and extended from the north end of the rock avalanche deposit – which is less than a mile south of present-day Zion Lodge – northward almost to The Narrows. With the initial lake surface at 4,658 feet elevation, the site of the lodge was under 380 feet of water.

Then the lake breached the top of the landslide dam, the lake surface fell to 4,413 feet in elevation and the lake’s area shrank to about 1.2 square miles, no longer extending to The Narrows but only 4.3 miles to the Temple of Sinawava.

Sediment amounts produced today by a nearby fork of the Virgin River suggest the lake filled with sediment in 700 years, give or take a century. By about 4,100 years ago, the lake had completely filled with sediment, forming the flat floor of Zion Canyon.

Moore calculates the Virgin River has eroded away about 45 percent of the original landslide deposit during the past 4,800 years. At that rate, in several thousand years Zion “will again be a steep, rocky, narrow canyon,” he says.

So Moore calls the landslide “a minute with up to 10,000 years of consequences.”

Moore notes that large landslides “create habitable land in otherwise steep landscapes around the world. People use flatter areas behind large landslide deposits for farming or to build a village” – although they sometimes are at risk from future slides.

Funding and co-authors

The study was funded partly by the David and Inga Chapman Fund, established by students of longtime University of Utah geophysicist David Chapman and his wife.

Moore conducted the study with Jessica Castleton, who earned her master’s degree at the University of Utah last year and works for the Utah Geological Survey; Jordan Aaron, who wrote the computer code to simulate the landslide’s distance and speed and who is a geological engineering doctoral student at the University of British Columbia; and Marcus Christl and Susan Ivy-Ochs, rock-dating experts at ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology.

 

Lee J. Siegel is a senior science writer at University Marketing and Communications. If you have an interesting story idea, email him at lee.siegel@utah.edu.

BUSINESS LOOP CLOSURE

The Business Loop, Campus Center Drive, is undergoing a renovation. The first phase is a redesign of the traffic flow through the area which begins on Tuesday, May 31, 2016. The area noted below, east of the new Central Parking Garage, will be closed permanently beginning May 31, 2016.

The east entrance to the ramp will be closed, the parking garage remains open with full access from the west end near the school of business. When complete, the roadway will be redesigned to include two roundabouts.

business-loop-reno

There is also a high temperature water infrastructure upgrade moving through the area that will temporarily close the steps to the northwest of the Huntsman Center. Those stairs will reopen for the start of school this fall.

Pedestrians coming to campus from TRAX South Campus stop will be routed to the east or west to avoid the closed area. An ADA accessible route will be marked, though it may be easier for individuals in wheelchairs to access the center of campus by exiting TRAX at the Fort Douglas stop and following the accessible route from the stop, along the south side of the Eccles Student Life Center and into the heart of campus.

Changes to the orange campus shuttle route will also be in place due to the construction in this area. It will run between the Union and Heritage, Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Visit uofubus.com to view shuttles live.

Orange-Route-5.31.16

If you have questions regarding the orange route or want additional information regarding campus shuttles, contact Commuter Services at 801-581-4189.

THE U WANTS U (TO NOMINATE A VETERAN)

Members of the public are encouraged to nominate a Utah Veteran to be honored at the University of Utah’s 19th annual Veterans Day commemoration Friday, Nov. 11, 2016, in the A. Ray Olpin Union building.

Honorees are selected after a thorough examination of their military service by a panel of fellow veterans, military experts, university faculty and staff and the public. The nominee must currently live in Utah and be able and willing to talk about his or her experiences in the armed forces. While all nominations will be considered, regardless of the time period and conditions under which the veteran served, special attention will be given to those who have been in harm’s way. The 11 veterans selected will receive a commemorative medallion and individual recognition at a public ceremony at the U on Veterans Day.

The deadline to submit nominations is June 30, 2016. Nomination forms are available online at veteransday.utah.edu.

PUBLIC SERVICE STARS

Several notable public servants with University of Utah connections were recently recognized at the 2016 Public Service Awards, sponsored by the Utah chapter of the American Society for Public Administration.  Award recipients have made outstanding contributions to the public sector and have helped to make Utah a better state.

“These awards provide an opportunity to publicly recognize a few outstanding individuals who have ASPAexcelled in promoting good government,” said J. Steven Ott, a professor in the Master of Public Administration Program at the University of Utah. “It’s exciting to pay tribute to those who have done so much to make communities stronger in Utah.”

Lina Svedin, director of the U’s public policy and public administration programs, noted that the U is proud to have played a role in educating many of the award recipients in recent years especially those with U master’s degrees in public administration and public policy.

“The quality of these award recipients showcases the strength of the University of Utah’s public administration and public policy programs, not only academically but also out in ‘the real world’ making a difference in Utah. While those honored have forged a path of public service through hard work on their own, we are pleased and proud that the U has played a role in helping many of them achieve their goals through our educational programs,” said Svedin.

For nearly 30 years, the American Society for Public Administration has provided the public service awards to raise awareness of the broad variety of services provided by the government and to show appreciation to public employees at the federal, state, county and local levels who elevate government work and improve the lives of others.

The Utah Chapter of ASPA presented its 2016 awards at an event in the Gould Auditorium at the Marriott Library on the University of Utah campus last week attended by several legislators and other public service administrators. The following four categories of awards were distributed:

Senator Arthur V. Watkins Distinguished Service Award for an Elected Official, awarded to a person who has shown exceptional commitment, skill, and integrity, while serving the public with special distinction.
2016 recipient: Sen. Brian Shiozawa, R-Cottonwood Heights

Excerpt from Shiozawa’s nomination letter

“Senator/Doctor Shiozawa graduated from Stanford, earned an MD at the University of Washington and did a residency in emergency medicine at the University of Utah. With compassion for patients, practitioners, and the public, he has shouldered crises of the emergency room, challenges of the medical profession, and clashes of Utah politics.

“As past president of the Utah Medical Association and now as a state senator, he is one of the most deservedly respected leaders in working to extend quality and affordable health care to the people of Utah. No elected official contributed more light and good purpose to the effort this year to expand Medicaid. He contributed greatly to the understanding of Utah’s potential — an understanding that can well serve the state through future progress.”

Homer Durham Distinguished Service Award for an Appointed Official, awarded to a person who has served the public with honor and integrity.
2016 recipient: Juan Palma

Excerpt from Palma’s nomination letter

“In 2015, Juan Palma retired from the position of Utah State Director for the U. S. Bureau of Land Management at a timewhen his was one of the most trying positions in public service in the West. Juan was dedicated to deescalating tensions and engaging with parties on all sides of controversies over conflicts involving the use of public lands in southern Utah.

“What made Juan unique as a public administrator is how he handled this environment. Instead of “shoot first and ask questions later,” Juan made Herculean efforts to build consensus. Juan spent a great deal of time and miles meeting with some of the BLM’s harshest critics in local government. He met endlessly with environmental groups to talk about BLM decisions and with industry representatives all in an attempt to do “the right thing.” During Juan’s tenure, BLM saw far less district court litigation over land use decisions than had been seen in any of the previous administrations. Tellingly, when Juan retired from public service, those local government leaders that had been BLM’s harshest critics gave him an award for his service.”

Ted Herbert Distinguished Service Award for Outstanding Contributions to Public Administration, awarded to a person who has made significant contributions to public administration through academia or as a public citizen.
2016 recipient: Jill E. Carter

Excerpt from Carter’s nomination letter

Ms. Jill Carter has served the public sector in Utah for several decades with unparalleled professionalism, dignity, energy, enthusiasm, and integrity. She has been a stand-out leader for strengthening the human resource management functions in city, county and state government and has taught numerous courses in human resource management for the University of Utah. Jill was one of the principal creators of the Certified Public Manager program in Utah as part of the team that developed the original curriculum and then taught numerous public managers for many years as a CPM Instructor.  She has consulted on HRM issues for numerous public agencies and was a trusted expert when a delicate investigation required a thoughtful, compassionate and professional intervention that probably only Carter could provide.

“Currently, Jill is Director of Human Resources for Questar Corporation, but she has not abandoned the public sector. She continues to teach human resources courses through the U’s Continuing Education & Community Engagement Division and in the MPA program. Before Questar, Jill was the Director of Administrative Services managing: Archives and Records, Contracts and Procurement, Human Resources, Facilities, Fleet, Information Services, Printing, and Volunteer Services. Prior to her employment with Salt Lake County, Jill served as the CEO and Principal Consultant of Carter Consulting for 25 + years. Her primary customers were government, regulated industry, community banks, nonprofits and cooperatives. Countless public servants in Utah owe their knowledge about public human resource management to Jill, and many others owe their start in HR careers to her.”


Boards and Commissions Award of Excellence, awarded to a person who has exhibited community service, work to support the common good, is proactive in decision-making, and has facilitated public participation in governmental processes.
2016 recipient: Jordan River Commission

Excerpt from Jordan River Commission nomination letter

“The Jordan River Commission is directed by Laura Hanson who has done an outstanding job getting work done along the Jordan River. The commission’s governing board is made up of 31 community leaders and other interested stakeholders. Most (if not all) of the cities that border the river are board members as well as representatives from the governor’s Office, Jordan Valley Water Conservancy District, the Utah Transit Authority, and many others.

“The commission focuses their work on efforts that support the river and implement the Blueprint Jordan River. The Blueprint is a document adopted by many as the regional vision and action plan for projects and policies. The commission has done many things in a short period of time. The commission has created a regional trail map, a pocket field guide, placed signage along the river, cleaned up the river and the river corridor, developed educational opportunities, and started an annual “Get Into the River” festival that brings people together from all over the region to celebrate the river. The commission has created community stewardship and service events building a connection between people and their natural environment. The commission has secured opportunities to fund research, educational, and restoration projects along the river. They have created ordinances, best practices, and other learning/sharing documents to ensure that we all understand the importance of the river and identify ways that promote actions that protect and enhance the river and those that rely on the river. The commission has exhibited over and over again community service and work that supports the common good. The commission has proven that they are proactive decision makers and they facilitate public participation in governmental processes.”


 

About the American Society for Public Administration

Established in 1939, the American Society for Public Administration is the largest and most prominent professional association in public administration. With a diverse membership of approximately 9,000 government and nonprofit administrators, scholars, educators, and students, ASPA advances the art, science, teaching and practice of public and nonprofit administration through its programs and services and fosters core public service values, including accountability and performance, professionalism, social equity, and ethics at the local, national and international levels. The Utah Chapter of ASPA is supported by the University of Utah’s Center for Public Policy and Administration.

BAMBÚ BIKE LOCKS

By Sara Best, student contributor, Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute

In the hustle to get where you’re going, the last thing you want is for someone to steal your bike. Yet, despite all of the sturdy bike locks out there, this is a major problem across college campuses and worldwide. So James Haskell, U marketing student and co-founder of Bambú, decided to take a stand.

Bambú is an extendable bike lock system that not only locks up your frame and front tire, it ensures that your entire bike frame and wheels are protected from those relentless thieves.

“I originally used a U-Lock and a cable myself, but I found that it was cumbersome to carry around both objects,” Haskell said. “I wanted something more compact and more secure.”

The design is similar to that of a U-Lock, but has an extendable interior element. This lends to its portability (fits in your backpack or bag), but also can be extended to cover each potentially removable component of your bicycle.

The idea was born in the “Entrepreneurial Marketing” class at the David Eccles School of Business. Haskell had recently had one of the tires from his bike stolen and was livid. So he pitched the idea to a group of students in his class, and they collaborated to develop this all-encompassing product. The team is made up of Haskell, Tait Meskey, Emi Deiss and Serge DuPreez.

In October, 2015, the Bambú team pitched their product at the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute’s Get Seeded event, which provided them with $1,000 to development a prototype.

“Our professor [Jackson Jayaraj] was an integral part of this process,” Haskell said. “He told us that we don’t need to be professionals to launch a successful company; we just need an idea, the ability to work in a team and the right resources. I feel like the Lassonde Institute gave us those resources.”

More articles like this in “Student Innovation @ the U”Student innovation @theU

Find this article and a lot more in the 2016 “Student Innovation @ the U” report. The publication is presented by the Lassonde Entrepreneur Institute to celebrate student innovators, change-makers and entrepreneurs.

 

 

MAKING RELIGION RELATABLE

By Chanapa Tantibanchachai

Josh Lipman, a recent U graduate, moves at 100 miles per hour. Animated, energetic and clearly completely dedicated to his work, speaking to him leaves one with a sense of wonder and awe at how he’s able to do it all.

Lipman, who transferred from Tufts University in January 2015, earned an honors bachelor’s degree in religious studies just this month, as well as minors in Hebrew and comparative literature and a certificate in integrated sustainability, expounds on how he believes religion affects everyday life.

“When you can discuss faith, moral, and communal claims with people, there’s a large space for dialogue on how people live their lives. Everyone has some sort of belief model; everyone thinks in belief paradigms, whether they subscribe to one that has an official name or not is another matter. You can see religion everywhere — in presidential debates, literature, art, etc. I want to use the Bible, a book that’s become increasingly viewed as stuffy, as a platform to engage people,” said Lipman.

Though he’s currently juggling a variety of research projects, Lipman’s main research project (also the topic of his honors thesis) is to engage The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints community by performing the first constructive environmental reading of the “Book of Mormon” to trace how the text treats the environment. In February 2016, he presented this work as part of the Tanner Humanities Center’s Work in Progress Lecture Series.

“I think it’s important to create a platform for people’s faith to be contemporary and pertinent,” said Lipman.

Lipman is also performing a reading on food in the Bible’s Book of Exodus and, with funding from the U’s Rio Mesa enter, tracing how divinity is elicited in Southern Utah’s landscape by using geographic information system maps to check for Biblical names with places in Utah, and then discussing the implications of whether, and how, that land can be used.

When not conducting research, Lipman is heavily involved in the campus community and the greater Salt Lake City community. He started 180 Degrees Consulting on campus, an on-campus group that trains students to be consultants for those who can’t afford consultants. He also founded the University of Utah Interfaith Scholars Group, which serves as a space for students to learn about the differences and similarities between their faiths and how they relate to the modern world.

Additionally, he is the president of the Jewish Students Association of Utah, is a MUSE Center Scholar, is a cohort member of the Honors College’s Social Justice Scholars and advises the local Jewish youth group.

Lipman credits the many faculty members who invested time in mentoring him, as well as the Tanner Humanities Center.

“There are so many great opportunities available on campus. Just go talk to your professors. They’re people too,” Lipman advised.

This coming fall, Lipman will attend Cambridge University to work on a doctorate in ecological hermeneutics.

“My approach to humanities is viewing it as a vehicle to impact society. I hope to be a humanist and academic in the sense that I don’t want to be locked away in an ivory tower, but I want to engage with people. I want to better understand how contemporary people interpret the Bible, and take ideas I find in academia that might be lost in jargon and reconfigure them for current conversations on faith to break down barriers.”

 

Chanapa Tantibanchachai is an associate science writer at University Marketing and Communications. If you have an interesting story idea, email her at chanapa.t@utah.edu.

Announcements

JUMP TO:
Red Butte Garden 2016 Outdoor Concert Series


RED BUTTE GARDEN 2016 OUTDOOR CONCERT SERIES


amphitheatre
Concert series tickets went on sale April 25 and are still available for 12-15 of the 30 acts that will perform in the Red Butte Garden Amphitheater this summer.

From its beginning in the 1980s as a series of five or six “alfresco summer concerts” in the garden on Sunday evenings, to the current 3,000-capacity Red Butte Garden Amphitheater with top-name acts and a schedule chock-full of consistently sold-out shows, Red Butte Garden is the place to experience some of the best summer concerts in Utah.

You get it all — panoramic alpine-glow views of the Wasatch Front and the Salt Lake Valley sunset, a botanical garden, your blanket and picnic spread out on the Amphitheater lawn in the foothills and then, of course, there are the amazing artists on stage.

Visit redbuttegarden.org/concerts to purchase tickets.

Student Life

JUMP TO:
Fall 2016 deadline to apply for graduation
Continue your access to the Eccles Student Life Center this summer
Red Butte Garden 2016 Outdoor Concert Series


FALL 2016 DEADLINE TO APPLY FOR GRADUATION


Block U
The deadline to apply for fall 2016 graduation is Wednesday, June 1, 2016.

Click here to view more academic deadlines.


CONTINUE YOUR ACCESS TO THE ECCLES STUDENT LIFE CENTER THIS SUMMER


Extension Pass Box
Planning on using the Eccles Student Life Center during the summer?

If you have graduated or are not taking classes, you will need to purchase a summer extension pass to access the Eccles Student Life Center. Extension passes may be purchased online or at the membership services desk at the Eccles Student Life Center.


RED BUTTE GARDEN 2016 OUTDOOR CONCERT SERIES


amphitheatre
Concert series tickets went on sale April 25 and are still available for 12-15 of the 30 acts that will perform in the Red Butte Garden Amphitheater this summer.

From its beginning in the 1980s as a series of five or six “alfresco summer concerts” in the garden on Sunday evenings, to the current 3,000-capacity Red Butte Garden Amphitheater with top-name acts and a schedule chock-full of consistently sold-out shows, Red Butte Garden is the place to experience some of the best summer concerts in Utah.

You get it all — panoramic alpine-glow views of the Wasatch Front and the Salt Lake Valley sunset, a botanical garden, your blanket and picnic spread out on the Amphitheater lawn in the foothills and then, of course, there are the amazing artists on stage.

Visit redbuttegarden.org/concerts to purchase tickets.


Highlighted Events

SUMMER FITNESS CLASSES BEGIN THIS WEEK
Monday, May 16-Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016
Eccles Student Life Center


Fitness Classes Summer 2016 Box
While the free summer classes are over, the Summer 2016 Fitness Program continues until Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016. We have plenty of classes to get you going and keep you going all summer. Check out the list of classes and register today.


HORTICULTURE CLASSES: PERENNIALS
Wednesdays, May 25-June 8, 2016 | 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Red Butte Garden

100x100xPerennials
Walk the aisles of any garden center in spring, and you’ll find yourself in the midst of a cornucopia of scent and color. The sign says “perennials,” and you know which ones appeal to you, but what else do you know about them? Whether you are starting a new garden or refreshing an existing one, you’ll want to select plants suited to your individual landscape and to pick combinations that offer color and blooms from early spring until frost.

Perennials: Spring and summer bloomers at Red Butte Garden.

Class and workshop prices vary and registration is required.

Check the website for more information.


FREE YOGA CLASSES
Begins Wednesday, May 25-Wednesday, July 27 on Wednesdays | 12-1 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library

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Join us for free yoga on Wednesdays, 12-1p.m., in room 205 (History of Medicine Room), at the Eccles Health Sciences Library. Please bring your own mat.

This 10 week yoga series will begin on May 25 and end on July 27. Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events.

This is a great opportunity to stretch and relax during the workday.

A student from Yoga Assets will lead us through yoga poses. Yoga Assets provides yoga teacher training in Salt Lake City. These events will enable a Yoga Assets student to fulfill their required volunteer hours for their yoga teacher certification.

Please send us feedback about this event. If well received, we plan to offer free drop-in yoga sessions on a regular basis.

WellU and WellnessNow credit may be available to participants.


RED BUTTE GARDEN ART EXHIBITS: LUCY PETERSON WATKINS
Friday, May 27-Sunday, June 19, 2016
Red Butte Garden

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Lucy Peterson Watkins began her career as an artist in 1993 when she began designing websites, shooting photography and quilting. Since then, these art forms have morphed into what she does now – Fiber Art, Mixed Media and Silk Painting.

She was the featured artist at Logan’s Summerfest in 2012 and one of her pieces was recently selected by Utah Public Radio (UPR) listeners as the art for UPR’s 60th Anniversary mug. Her art has been shown in Utah at the Thatcher House in Logan, the Quilt Shows in Springville and Brigham City, Red Butte Garden, the Finch Lane Gallery Holiday Market, as well as many other local shows and holiday art fairs.

“I enjoy creating art by doing something totally different. Most of my pieces depict the place I grew up in and love – Cache Valley and Utah.”

Watkins and her husband Cary Watkins are the hosts of Art On The Lawn, a one-day art festival held on their property in North Logan on the last Saturday of June for the last eleven years.

More on Watkins here and go here for other art exhibits.

Cost: Regular garden admission and garden members free.


GENOME: UNLOCKING LIFE’S CODE
Saturday, May 21-Monday, Sept. 5, 2016 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah

GENOME-001_0
Do you have your mother’s dimples or your father’s hairline? Explore how your genome is a complete set of instructions that makes you, you. Learn how this road map can help you trace your ancestral past and help you take charge of your future health.

For more information, go here.


HOME IN THEIR EYES: IMAGES AND STORIES OF HOME BY RESIDENTS IN RURAL CHINA
Ongoing through Thursday, June 2, 2016
Marriott Library

Home in their eyes
This exhibition illustrates the meanings of home in the eyes of the residents of Yanxia village in Zhejiang Province, China, a small lineage-based settlement in rural China. These photographs are extracted from Windy Zhao’s dissertation, which examines the ways in which traditions have affected the meaning of home for people living in Yanxia. During Zhao’s research, single-use cameras were distributed to the participants and the participants were asked to take photographs of meaningful aspects of their home. Zhao followed with semi-structured in-depth interviews on the content of the photographs. Twenty-two photographs taken by 18 participants are included in this exhibition. Each photograph is accompanied by a short biographic sketch of the photographer and the personal stories behind the photograph that constitute his or her understanding of home.

Park in the visitor parking lot, west of the library, next to the Campus Store.


TUNNEL VISION: A SELECTION OF BOOKS FROM RARE BOOKS COLLECTION
Ongoing through Friday, June 3, 2016
Marriott Library

Tunnel Vision
Tunnel Vision: A Selection of Tunnel, Pop-up and Movable Books from the Rare Books Department

Tunnel Vision features a selection of pieces from the rare book collections produced using various paper manipulations to create the illusion of depth — framing and narrowing the viewers’ perspective. This exhibition is the result of a collaboration between the Book Arts Program, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, and the Rare Books Department. It coincides with two events (see below) inspired by Nancy Holt’s famous land art piece, Sun Tunnels, located in Utah’s west desert.

Park in the visitor parking lot, west of the library, next to the Campus Store.


ALPINE LAKE STAND UP PADDLEBOARDING
Saturday, June 4, 2016 | 8:30 a.m.
Meet at Outdoor Adventures and short drive to Uinta Mountains


OA Summer '16 Alpine SUP Box
Join Outdoor Adventures for an awesome day escaping the heat of Salt Lake City to the cool mountains just a short drive away. What’s better than a day spent paddling around one of Utah’s beautiful lakes or reservoirs? Bring a lunch of your choice and we’ll provide some snacks. Trips are only open to University of Utah students, faculty and staff (including their guests). Call 801-581-8516 or come to Outdoor Adventures to register.

Trip Cost: $25+tax (full payment due upon registration and non-refundable)
Location: Uinta Mountains, UT
We provide: All group equipment, snacks, transportation, leadership and stand up paddleboard equipment

Notes: No pre-trip meeting. Please meet at Outdoor Adventures at 8:30 a.m. You are welcome to park in the Student Life Center lot. Please pack your own lunch and water.


Faculty Club Beer and Wine Tasting
Saturday, June 4, 2016 | 7 p.m.
Eleanor Divver’s House (Faculty Club social director)


Faculty Clubjpg
Join the Faculty Club for a members-only after-dinner beer and wine tasting. Bring a bottle of wine or some beer to share and compare. Desserts and snacks will be provided. To RSVP, email anna.naylor@hsc.utah.edu and she will provide directions to the house.

Faculty are invited to join the Faculty Club for just  $5 per month. Members have access to monthly socials, discounted hotel rooms at the Marriott University Park, discounted theatre and museum tickets with group gatherings before or after, free basketball and volleyball tickets and pregame pizza parties, the family holiday party, access to the Faculty Club cabin and more. Visit facultyclub.utah.edu for more information.


MAINTAINING INDEPENDENCE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENT
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Moran Eye Center – John A. (MEC)


Visual impairment
“Maintaining Independence with Visual Impairment is a 5-week training course designed to help you keep your boots on the pavement and your head in the game. This class will meet weekly and we will learn important skills and valuable information about how to meet the challenges of daily life with visual impairments. Topics covered will include: transportation, mobility, reading, accessing information, shopping, social life, hobbies, entertainment and much more. The emphasis will be on creative problem solving for your unique circumstances, adventure and FUN.

This class is offered at no charge; however, registration is required.

Contact Corinna Trujillo Tanner.


DUTCH OVEN COOKING CLINIC
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 | 6-8 p.m.
Outdoor Adventures, Eccles Student Life Center


OA Summer '16 Dutch Oven Clinic Box
Come to Outdoor Adventures for a dutch oven date night. Bring your friends, family and loved ones to learn about dutch oven cooking. Anyone and everyone welcome. We’ll be doing lots of cooking, baking and eating. Please register in advance at Outdoor Adventures so we can plan the menu. We’ll be sensitive to allergies, preferences and have vegetarian options.

Call 801-581-8516 or come to Outdoor Adventures to register.

Clinic Cost: $4+tax (full payment due upon registration and non-refundable).

Notes: We will provide everything you need. Please register in advance.


PUBLIC SPEAKING: HOW TO PRESENT (UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH EDUCATION SERIES)
Thursday, June 9, 2016 | 2:45-3:45 p.m.
Sill Center – Sterling (SILL)


Block U

Presented by Martine Kei Green-Rogers

In this seminar you will hear about techniques for and issues with effective public speaking. You will learn how to present in a variety of formats. This seminar is useful for any student, as public speaking is both necessary in research dissemination and takes a lot of practice.


Campus Events

SUMMER FITNESS CLASSES BEGIN THIS WEEK
Monday, May 16-Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016
Eccles Student Life Center


Fitness Classes Summer 2016 Box
While the free summer classes are over, the Summer 2016 Fitness Program continues until Sunday, Aug. 7, 2016. We have plenty of classes to get you going and keep you going all summer. Check out the list of classes and register today.


HORTICULTURE CLASSES: PERENNIALS
Wednesdays, May 25-June 8, 2016 | 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Red Butte Garden

100x100xPerennials
Walk the aisles of any garden center in spring, and you’ll find yourself in the midst of a cornucopia of scent and color. The sign says “perennials,” and you know which ones appeal to you, but what else do you know about them? Whether you are starting a new garden or refreshing an existing one, you’ll want to select plants suited to your individual landscape and to pick combinations that offer color and blooms from early spring until frost.

Perennials: Spring and summer bloomers at Red Butte Garden.

Class and workshop prices vary and registration is required.

Check the website for more information.


FREE YOGA CLASSES
Begins Wednesday, May 25-Wednesday, July 27 on Wednesdays | 12-1 p.m.
Eccles Health Sciences Library

yoga-flyer-300x212
Join us for free yoga on Wednesdays, 12-1p.m., in room 205 (History of Medicine Room), at the Eccles Health Sciences Library. Please bring your own mat.

This 10 week yoga series will begin on May 25 and end on July 27. Drop by for one event or attend all of the free yoga events.

This is a great opportunity to stretch and relax during the workday.

A student from Yoga Assets will lead us through yoga poses. Yoga Assets provides yoga teacher training in Salt Lake City. These events will enable a Yoga Assets student to fulfill their required volunteer hours for their yoga teacher certification.

Please send us feedback about this event. If well received, we plan to offer free drop-in yoga sessions on a regular basis.

WellU and WellnessNow credit may be available to participants.


RED BUTTE GARDEN ART EXHIBITS: LUCY PETERSON WATKINS
Friday, May 27-Sunday, June 19, 2016
Red Butte Garden

tree_horizontal_painter
Lucy Peterson Watkins began her career as an artist in 1993 when she began designing websites, shooting photography and quilting. Since then, these art forms have morphed into what she does now – Fiber Art, Mixed Media and Silk Painting.

She was the featured artist at Logan’s Summerfest in 2012 and one of her pieces was recently selected by Utah Public Radio (UPR) listeners as the art for UPR’s 60th Anniversary mug. Her art has been shown in Utah at the Thatcher House in Logan, the Quilt Shows in Springville and Brigham City, Red Butte Garden, the Finch Lane Gallery Holiday Market, as well as many other local shows and holiday art fairs.

“I enjoy creating art by doing something totally different. Most of my pieces depict the place I grew up in and love – Cache Valley and Utah.”

Watkins and her husband Cary Watkins are the hosts of Art On The Lawn, a one-day art festival held on their property in North Logan on the last Saturday of June for the last eleven years.

More on Watkins here and go here for other art exhibits.

Cost: Regular garden admission and garden members free.


GENOME: UNLOCKING LIFE’S CODE
Saturday, May 21-Monday, Sept. 5, 2016 | 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah

GENOME-001_0
Do you have your mother’s dimples or your father’s hairline? Explore how your genome is a complete set of instructions that makes you, you. Learn how this road map can help you trace your ancestral past and help you take charge of your future health.

For more information, go here.


HOME IN THEIR EYES: IMAGES AND STORIES OF HOME BY RESIDENTS IN RURAL CHINA
Ongoing through Thursday, June 2, 2016
Marriott Library

Home in their eyes
This exhibition illustrates the meanings of home in the eyes of the residents of Yanxia village in Zhejiang Province, China, a small lineage-based settlement in rural China. These photographs are extracted from Windy Zhao’s dissertation, which examines the ways in which traditions have affected the meaning of home for people living in Yanxia. During Zhao’s research, single-use cameras were distributed to the participants and the participants were asked to take photographs of meaningful aspects of their home. Zhao followed with semi-structured in-depth interviews on the content of the photographs. Twenty-two photographs taken by 18 participants are included in this exhibition. Each photograph is accompanied by a short biographic sketch of the photographer and the personal stories behind the photograph that constitute his or her understanding of home.

Park in the visitor parking lot, west of the library, next to the Campus Store.


TUNNEL VISION: A SELECTION OF BOOKS FROM RARE BOOKS COLLECTION
Ongoing through Friday, June 3, 2016
Marriott Library

Tunnel Vision
Tunnel Vision: A Selection of Tunnel, Pop-up and Movable Books from the Rare Books Department

Tunnel Vision features a selection of pieces from the rare book collections produced using various paper manipulations to create the illusion of depth — framing and narrowing the viewers’ perspective. This exhibition is the result of a collaboration between the Book Arts Program, the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, and the Rare Books Department. It coincides with two events (see below) inspired by Nancy Holt’s famous land art piece, Sun Tunnels, located in Utah’s west desert.

Park in the visitor parking lot, west of the library, next to the Campus Store.


ALPINE LAKE STAND UP PADDLEBOARDING
Saturday, June 4, 2016 | 8:30 a.m.
Meet at Outdoor Adventures and short drive to Uinta Mountains


OA Summer '16 Alpine SUP Box
Join Outdoor Adventures for an awesome day escaping the heat of Salt Lake City to the cool mountains just a short drive away. What’s better than a day spent paddling around one of Utah’s beautiful lakes or reservoirs? Bring a lunch of your choice and we’ll provide some snacks. Trips are only open to University of Utah students, faculty and staff (including their guests). Call 801-581-8516 or come to Outdoor Adventures to register.

Trip Cost: $25+tax (full payment due upon registration and non-refundable)
Location: Uinta Mountains, UT
We provide: All group equipment, snacks, transportation, leadership and stand up paddleboard equipment

Notes: No pre-trip meeting.  Please meet at Outdoor Adventures at 8:30 a.m.  You are welcome to park in the Student Life Center lot.  Please pack your own lunch and water.


MAINTAINING INDEPENDENCE WITH VISUAL IMPAIRMENT
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 | 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Moran Eye Center – John A. (MEC)


Visual impairment
“Maintaining Independence with Visual Impairment is a 5-week training course designed to help you keep your boots on the pavement and your head in the game. This class will meet weekly and we will learn important skills and valuable information about how to meet the challenges of daily life with visual impairments. Topics covered will include: transportation, mobility, reading, accessing information, shopping, social life, hobbies, entertainment and much more. The emphasis will be on creative problem solving for your unique circumstances, adventure and FUN.

This class is offered at no charge; however, registration is required.

Contact Corinna Trujillo Tanner.


DUTCH OVEN COOKING CLINIC
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 | 6-8 p.m.
Outdoor Adventures, Eccles Student Life Center


OA Summer '16 Dutch Oven Clinic Box
Come to Outdoor Adventures for a dutch oven date night. Bring your friends, family and loved ones to learn about dutch oven cooking.  Anyone and everyone welcome.  We’ll be doing lots of cooking, baking and eating. Please register in advance at Outdoor Adventures so we can plan the menu.  We’ll be sensitive to allergies, preferences and have vegetarian options.

Call 801-581-8516 or come to Outdoor Adventures to register.

Clinic Cost: $4+tax (full payment due upon registration and non-refundable).

Notes: We will provide everything you need. Please register in advance.


PUBLIC SPEAKING: HOW TO PRESENT (UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH EDUCATION SERIES)
Thursday, June 9, 2016 | 2:45-3:45 p.m.
Sill Center – Sterling (SILL)


Block U

Presented by Martine Kei Green-Rogers

In this seminar you will hear about techniques for and issues with effective public speaking. You will learn how to present in a variety of formats. This seminar is useful for any student, as public speaking is both necessary in research dissemination and takes a lot of practice.