SKI THE U

Utah is home to the greatest snow on Earth. I saw that on a license plate once so it must be true. With that in mind and knowing that University of Utah faculty, staff and students are among the most gung-ho skiers and snowboarders out there, we wanted to create a resource just for you. The new ski.utah.edu is a site that brings together deals and discounts, up-to-the-minute mountain conditions, a place to share your content, in-depth resort features and much more.

Each week throughout the 2015-16 ski season you’ll find a special feature ranging from specific resort spotlights, to sustainability messages. We are working with local ski resorts and community partners to bring you special deals and discounts that will allow you to get to resorts that you might not have experienced…or even known exist. Whether you’re a dedicated and longtime skier, or new to winters here in Utah we encourage you to explore ski.utah.edu throughout the season and get out and explore all that Utah has to offer during this amazing time of the year.

There’s so much to explore on ski.utah.edu. We’ll be featuring your content on the site throughout the year, giving away lift tickets, posting videos, talking about sustainability, highlighting entrepreneurial University of Utah connections to the ski industry and generally just loving all things winter. Join us at ski.utah.edu.

 

SKI.UTAH.EDU FEATURES


HomepageINTERACTIVE HOMEPAGE

360° interactive panoramic view of some of the amazing resorts located right here in our own backyard. From here you can access all the features of ski.utah.edu…and SNOW.


mountain-reportMOUNTAIN REPORTS

If you’re planning to head up to the slopes you’ll want to be prepared. Use the Mountain Report feature on ski.utah.edu to get the current weather conditions at all the resorts at a glance. How much snow did Alta get last night? Not enough? Maybe you’ll want to head to Park City today. Mountain Report will tell you at a glance where you should be heading to shred the gnar today.


resortRESORT DETAILS

Utah is home to some of the greatest ski resorts in the world, taking advantage of the greatest snow on earth. With so many amazing choices in such varied terrain how could you possibly choose? You probably have your favorites, but how do they stack up to ones you may never have visited? Check out the Resort Details pages and see how many greens, blues, blacks, lifts, runs and more each of these winter playgrounds feature.


dealsDEALS & DISCOUNTS

One thing is clear, Utah ski resorts want your business as evidenced by the deals they make available to you. Aside from all the great deals we’ll be featuring this season with specific resorts during their feature week, you can always check out ski.utah.edu for current deals and links to deal websites. Skiing is the best…but it can be expensive. Save some money and bookmark the deals at ski.utah.edu.

Deals & Discounts

FACULTY AND STAFF NIGHT AT THE CAMPUS STORE
Tuesday, Dec. 8 | 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m.

12-8-15
On Tuesday, Dec. 8, the University Campus Store will host its annual Faculty and Staff Appreciation Night, showing gratitude and support for the university community by offering 30 percent off purchases all day, from 7:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Join your friends at the Campus Store for food, prizes and fun and get your holiday shopping started with new Utes outerwear and apparel, toys, games, gift items and more.

Families are welcome and events begin at 5 p.m., including an appearance by Santa Claus. Please bring your UCard or a recent pay stub to claim your 30 percent discount (excludes electronics, software, textbooks, services and diploma frames).

 

 


Construction & Commuter Updates

NEW:

–    During Geek Week and final exam period (Dec. 7-18) the Campus Store visitor pay lot will be free after 6 p.m.

EVCSLocations

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations locations. Click to enlarge.

–    Additional safety features will be installed at the intersection of Wasatch Drive and Mario Capecchi. This work will impact the northwest corner of the intersection and should not affect the roadway traffic. The work is scheduled to be completed the second week in December.

–    Three stairways in Lot 50 (hospital terrace) are scheduled for repair. The projects are currently out to bid and the work is expected to begin January 2016.

–    The U is a partner with LeadersforCleanAir.org. As such, new electric vehicle charging stations have been installed in the Northwest Garage and Central Garage and will be installed near Madsen Clinics and USTAR before the end of the month. For more information about electric charging permits, please call 801-581-6415.

–    Construction has begun on a new parking garage directly east of the medical towers. The garage is expected to be complete in winter of 2016. Click here for information regarding permit changes and replacement parking for “A” and “U” permit holders.

sidewalk closed

Shuttle road map. Click to enlarge.

–    The sidewalk between MBH and Sorenson Arts & Ed is closed for construction of a road to allow for an electric shuttle to cross through the middle of campus. The sidewalk is expected to open by the beginning of spring semester. See map below for alternative route.

See the construction impact map below.

Student Life

ASUU’s GEEK WEEK EXTENDING MARRIOTT LIBRARY HOURS FOR FINAL

In collaboration with the Marriott Library, ASUU’s Academic Affairs Board is extending library hours for students from Dec. 1-17. For details about extended hours, visit lib.utah.edu/info/hours.php. Intermountain Therapy Dogs, free pizza and studying supplies are just a few of the Geek Week services ASUU is excited to bring back for Geek Week. For more details about Geek Week, visit: asuu.utah.edu/geekweek. 

 


 

SPRING 2016 OPEN ENROLLMENT BEGINS

This is a reminder that open enrollment for spring 2016 semester begins Monday, Nov. 30. If you have any questions, contact the Office of the Registrar at registrar.utah.edu or 801-581-5808.


AMF-Holiday-Grief-Tips1

Click to enlarge

STUDENT-LED GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP ON CAMPUS

One in four college students is grieving the death of a loved one. On a campus where over 30,000 students are currently enrolled, this means that there are over 7,500 students grieving. As anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one knows, the world keeps on turning despite the grief. This is especially true on a college campus where students are expected keep up with our studies. Combine this with a culture where death is a taboo subject and many are left with an environment in which expressing grief can be particularly difficult.

Actively Moving Forward (AMF) is non-profit organization committed to supporting college students who are grieving the death of a loved one. The University of Utah chapter runs a student-led grief support group providing a space for students to talk about their experience and feel supported by their peers. The group is held the first and third Wednesday of the month from 6-7:30 p.m. and the fist and third Thursday of the month from 12-1:30 p.m. in the Union.
As a group of grieving college students supporting other grieving students on campus, we know the holidays can be an especially difficult time. While, we do not believe that there is one “right” way to grieve, we want to offer a few tips to help students deal with their grief over the holidays.

 

 



OPEN THE DOOR TO GIVING WITH THE U HOSPITAL ANNUAL FOOD DRIVE

U Hosptiall food drive
Join the University Hospital food drive and make a difference this year.

The annual hospital food drive, held Nov. 23 through Dec. 15, benefits the Utah Food Bank. All donations will support the mission to feed hungry Utahns.

There are many ways to give: Run the Utah Human Race on Thanksgiving morning, donate online or volunteer at the Utah Food Bank to help the hospital reach this year’s goal of 450,000 pounds of donated food.

University Hospital has led the effort to gather food donations for those in need over the past five years, collecting over 1,262,340 pounds of food since 2010.

Call Tracy Bodrero at 801-581-2429 with any questions about volunteering, and for more ways to give, visit Pulse.


THE CALVIN S. AND JENEAL N. HATCH PRIZE IN TEACHING
Deadline: Dec. 4, 2015
UTC-poster-final
The Hatch Prize recognizes an outstanding and longstanding service by a teacher from tenure-line faculty ranks. The recipient of the Hatch Prize will receive $5,000. The award will be announced in March 2016.

All award nominations, grant applications and fellowship applications are available for submission online here.

 

 

 


EARLY CAREER TEACHING AWARD
Deadline: Dec. 4, 2015
UTC-poster-final
The Early Career Teaching Award recognizes up to four outstanding faculty at an early stage in their careers at the University of Utah. To be eligible, a faculty member must have completed at least three full years but fewer than eight years of service at the university and must be tenure-line or career-line faculty. Each recipient will also receive $2,500. These awards will be announced in March 2016.

All award nominations, grant applications, and fellowship applications are available for submission online here.

 

 


U EXPLORES THE BODY IN CINEMA WITH NEW COURSE
The body and the screen
Beginning spring 2016, the U’s Department of Film and Media Arts and the Department of Modern Dance will offer a new course titled The Body & The Screen (FILM 3905-002, DANC 3961-002, DANC 6961-002) that will critically explore bodies in cinema, both on and off the screen.

This new course will also explore the connections between the filmic medium and bodies: bodies that watch the screen, bodies on the screen and everything in between. The creator and teacher of the course is Stéphane Glynn, who received his bachelors degree from the University of Virginia with majors in media studies and psychology and a dance minor. He is currently completing an MFA in film production and a graduate certificate in Screendance at the University of Utah.

For more information, click here.

 


HR Updates

CAMPAIGN FOR OUR COMMUNITY
cfoc_logo
The University of Utah’s Campaign for Our Community is an annual event to encourage staff and faculty to conveniently donate to charitable organizations in our community that provide vital services to those with a critical need. For example, a contribution of just $2 per paycheck would provide a week’s supply of food for one family at the Utah Food Bank, send two kids to Camp Hobé for a day or make possible food and refuge for a cat or dog at the Wasatch Humane Shelter.

This year’s campaign is now open; to donate, please visit the campaign webpage where you will be able to make a payroll deduction election and/or complete and submit a pdf donation form (to donate by credit card or check).


Announcements

U HONORED WITH UTAH GREEN BUSINESS AWARD

Utah Business Magazine recently recognized the University of Utah with a Utah Green Business Award in the category Corporate Excellence. Chief Sustainability Officer Amy Wildermuth accepted the award at a ceremony Thursday, Nov. 19. The U was recognized for its efforts to organize an air quality task force that developed recommendations for reducing emissions and lessening the institutions’s overall contribution to poor air quality among other sustainable projects. 


DISTINGUISHED INNOVATION AND IMPACT AWARD

Deadline: Dec. 4, 2015

The Distinguished Innovation and Impact Award recognizes outstanding faculty innovators for contributions that improved the lives of people. The award recognizes contributions by faculty from all academic disciplines, including health care, energy, environment, business, law, communications, technology or the arts. Awards are given each year to one or two outstanding faculty members who distinguished themselves and the university through entrepreneurial activities that resulted in innovations with a measurable societal impact. Faculty on career, clinical or tenure tracks are eligible. The recipient receives public recognition plus a $10,000 cash award to be used at his or her discretion. Please submit your online nomination here.


 

AMF-Holiday-Grief-Tips1

Click to enlarge

STUDENT-LED GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP ON CAMPUS

One in four college students is grieving the death of a loved one. On a campus where over 30,000 students are currently enrolled, this means that there are over 7,500 students grieving. As anyone who has experienced the death of a loved one knows, the world keeps on turning despite the grief. This is especially true on a college campus where students are expected keep up with our studies. Combine this with a culture where death is a taboo subject and many are left with an environment in which expressing grief can be particularly difficult.

Actively Moving Forward (AMF) is non-profit organization committed to supporting college students who are grieving the death of a loved one. The University of Utah chapter runs a student-led grief support group providing a space for students to talk about their experience and feel supported by their peers. The group is held the first and third Wednesday of the month from 6-7:30 p.m. and the fist and third Thursday of the month from 12-1:30 p.m. in the Union.
As a group of grieving college students supporting other grieving students on campus, we know the holidays can be an especially difficult time. While, we do not believe that there is one “right” way to grieve, we want to offer a few tips to help students deal with their grief over the holidays.

 

 



OPEN THE DOOR TO GIVING WITH THE U HOSPITAL ANNUAL FOOD DRIVE

U Hosptiall food drive
Join the University Hospital food drive and make a difference this year.

The annual hospital food drive, held Nov. 23 through Dec. 15, benefits the Utah Food Bank. All donations will support the mission to feed hungry Utahns.

There are many ways to give: Run the Utah Human Race on Thanksgiving morning, donate online or volunteer at the Utah Food Bank to help the hospital reach this year’s goal of 450,000 pounds of donated food.

University Hospital has led the effort to gather food donations for those in need over the past five years, collecting over 1,262,340 pounds of food since 2010.

Call Tracy Bodrero at 801-581-2429 with any questions about volunteering, and for more ways to give, visit Pulse.


THE CALVIN S. AND JENEAL N. HATCH PRIZE IN TEACHING
Deadline: Dec. 4, 2015
UTC-poster-final
The Hatch Prize recognizes an outstanding and longstanding service by a teacher from tenure-line faculty ranks. The recipient of the Hatch Prize will receive $5,000. The award will be announced in March 2016.

All award nominations, grant applications and fellowship applications are available for submission online here.

 

 

 


EARLY CAREER TEACHING AWARD
Deadline: Dec. 4, 2015
UTC-poster-final
The Early Career Teaching Award recognizes up to four outstanding faculty at an early stage in their careers at the University of Utah. To be eligible, a faculty member must have completed at least three full years but fewer than eight years of service at the University and must be tenure-line or career-line faculty. Each recipient will also receive $2,500. These awards will be announced in March 2016.

All award nominations, grant applications, and fellowship applications are available for submission online here.

 

 


UTILIZING UNIVERSITY MAIL RESOURCES FOR PERSONAL USE

As the holiday season approaches and usage of mail services increases, University Print & Mail Services would like to remind campus that personal correspondence and deliveries should not be sent to campus addresses but rather to home addresses. Because of recent changes with UPS and FedEx rerouting packages through the U.S. Postal Service, the volume of packages distributed through Campus Mail has increased significantly, making prompt deliveries more difficult.

Pursuant to university policy 3-166, “use of the campus mail system is available only to recognized university organizations for official university purposes and is not intended for personal use.” Accordingly, faculty and staff should refrain from using the Campus Mail system for receiving or sending personal mail. Questions or concerns may be directed to Juan Sosa at 801-580-7792 or Juan.Sosa@utah.edu.

 

 

Campus Events

PUBLIC SPEAKING (OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH EDUCATION SEMINAR)
Monday, Nov. 30 | 9:30-10:30 a.m.
Sill Center, Large Conference Room

This seminar is presented by an Undergraduate Research Leader with the Office of Undergraduate Research. You will hear about techniques for and issues with effective public speaking from a student’s perspective. This seminar is useful for any student, as public speaking is both necessary in research dissemination and takes a lot of practice.


 

INCOME INEQUALITY: SAFETY NETS AND LABOR ORGANIZATION (DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS VISITING SPEAKER SERIES)

Monday, Nov. 30| 3:30-5 p.m.
USTAR Auditorium, SMBB 2650

At this event, Sheldon Danzinger from the Russell Sage Foundation will present “Can the US Reduce Poverty and Inequality without a Stronger Safety Net?” and Richard Freeman from Harvard University will present “Can the US Reduce Inequality and Poverty without Strong Labor Organizations?”


ACADEMIC SENATE MEETING
Monday, Nov. 30 | 3 p.m.
Carolyn Tanner Irish Humanities Building, Room 109

Two important policy proposals will be discussed at the next Academic Senate meeting, the Safety of Minors Policy and Limiting Course Attempts. They will be heard and voted on by faculty and student representatives from all colleges across campus.

The meeting will be held on Monday, Nov. 30, in the Carolyn Tanner Irish Humanities Building, Room 109 at 3 p.m.


NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE
Monday, Nov. 30 | 7:30-8:30 p.m.

Dumke Recital Hall
New Music Ensemble
Come and enjoy an evening with the New Music Ensemble as they offer a wide variety of 20th and 21st century music, from masterworks to new, exploratory compositions, performed by freshman through doctoral students. Audiences delight in works by composers such as Messiaen, Stravinsky, Davidovsky, Ligeti and more, performed with understanding, clarity and excitement.

 

 

 


GCSC SEMINAR: ‘THE SCIENCE/POLICY INTERFACE: CLIMATE ADAPTATION AND DECISION-MAKING’
Tuesday, Dec. 1 | 4-5 p.m.
Aline Wilmot Skaggs Biology Building (ASB)
climate adaptation
This seminar will explore the intersection between science and decision-making, including a discussion of multiple experiments in coproduction of knowledge between stakeholders and scientists in the context of preparing for the risks and opportunities associated with climate change.

 

 

 

 


OPPORTUNITY QUEST REGISTRATION
Tuesday, Dec. 1

OQ3
Registration opens on Dec. 1 for Opportunity Quest, a business summary
competition. Branch competitions are held at the University of Utah and schools across the state. Top teams win prizes and advance to the Utah Entrepreneur Challenge. Registration deadline is Jan. 15. Online registration here.

 



‘THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING’ FILM PREMIER
Tuesday, Dec. 1 | 7 p.m.

Marriott Library, Gould Auditorium
Poster 2
The Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund in conjunction with the Marriott Library present a free film premier of “This Changes Everything,” adapted from Naomi Klein’s international non-fiction best-seller. Filmed over 211 shoot days in nine countries and five continents over four years, “This Changes Everything” is an epic attempt to re-imagine the vast challenge of climate change.

 

 

 

 

 

 


JAZZ ENSEMBLE
Tuesday, Dec. 1 | 7:30-8:30 p.m.
Libby Gardner Concert Hall
jazz ensemble
General Admission: $12
Arts Pass Event: Free to U students with UCard
Other students:$6
Faculty, staff and seniors:$6

Go here for more information and for tickets.

 

 


WOMEN’S ALUMNI EVENT
Wednesday, Dec. 2 | 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Spencer Fox Eccles Business Building (SFEBB)
womens alumni
Sara Laschever has spent her career investigating what shapes women’s lives and careers. She has written extensively about women in business, literature and the arts, academia, and the sciences. Her work has been published by The New York Times, The New York Review of Books, The Harvard Business Review, Vogue, Glamour, and many other publications.

Laschever is faculty of the Carnegie Mellon Leadership. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University and a master’s degree from Boston University.

 

 


WINTER NIGHTS
Wednesday, Dec. 2 | 5-9 p.m.
Natural History Museum of Utah

Winter Nights
Stay warm and cozy this December at the Natural History Museum of Utah’s Winter Nights. Fun and festivities for the whole family each Wednesday evening, including free musical presentations, discounts at the museum store, ornament making, cookies and hot chocolate. Visit the website for details, including the live performance schedule.

Admission to Canyon area is FREE and it’s $9-$13 to visit museum galleries. For more information, go here.

 

 


HOLIDAY ART EVENTS ON CAMPUS
Wednesday, Dec. 2-Thursday, Dec. 31
Various locations

Holiday art events begin this week on campus. Click here for a list of the events being held on campus.



UTAH STREAM ACCESS LAW – LOG DRIVES AND NAVIGABILITY
Thursday, Dec. 3 | 12:15-1:15 p.m.
College of Law – S. J. Quinney (LAW)

Law logo
Cullen Battle, lead counsel in the recent Weber River navigability adjudication, will discuss a new approach to securing public recreational access to Utah’s rivers that involves the ancient doctrine of navigability and evidence of log drives that occurred in the late 1800’s.

Cullen is lead counsel for the plaintiff in Utah Stream Access Coalition v. Park, a case adjudicating the navigability of the Weber River. He received his law degree from the University of Virginia and has practiced at Fabian & Clendenin in Salt Lake City since 1981. He has served on the Utah Supreme Court’s Advisory Committee on Civil Procedure, the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission, the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board and Salt Lake City’s Public Utilities Advisory Committee. His areas of practice include public lands and environmental law, public utility law, land use law and complex real estate and commercial litigation. Cullen is an Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Utah, where he teaches Environmental Law Practice.

Click here for more information.


FOOD STUDIES SEMINAR SERIES
Thursday, Dec. 3 | 4-5 p.m.
Orson Spencer Hall (OSH)
Food Studies Seminar
Join us for the “Food Studies Seminar Series: Investigating School Food Policies.”

Please use public transportation where available. Ride UTA and Google Maps provide the best route information.

Contact Adrienne.Cachelin@health.utah.edu with any questions.

 

 

 


FEARLESS: BALLET SHOWCASE
Thursday, Dec. 3 | 5:30-6:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 4 | 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 5 | 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
(Thursday) Marriott Center for Dance – Alice Sheets (MCD)
(Friday and Saturday) Hayes Christensen Theatre
Fearless
Fifteen University of Utah Department of Ballet student choreographers throw caution to the wind this fall for their upcoming showcase.

$12 Adult, $8 U faculty and staff, children and seniors.
Arts Pass event: FREE to U students with UCard.

Get your tickets here.

 

 


HOW TO WRITE A PERSONAL STATEMENT (OFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH EDUCATION SERIES)
Friday, Dec. 4 |10-11 a.m. 
Sill Center Large Conference Room

In this seminar you will learn about what content goes into an effective personal statement and how to structure your personal statement.  Personal statements are necessary for graduate, medical, and professional school applications, as well as for many job applications.  This seminar will be useful to students at any point in their education.


FRIDAYS WITH FACULTY: INES THIEBAUT
Friday, Dec. 4 | 12 p.m.
Dumke Recital Hall
Friday with faculty
“Symmetry and Aggregate Completion in Mario Davidovsky’s Quartettos”

 

 

 

 


MENOTTI’S AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS
Saturday, Dec. 5 | 7:30-8:30 p.m.
Libby Gardner Concert Hall
Menotti's Amahl and night visitors
$10 tickets for adults, $5 for students and seniors.
Available by calling 801-531-7501 or at the door with cash, check or credit card.

Visit saltlakesymphony.org for more information.

 

 

 


UNIVERSES: LIVE FROM THE EDGE
Saturday, Dec. 5 | 7:30 p.m.
Kingsbury Hall

UniversesFusing poetry, jazz, hip-hop, Spanish bolero, and Southern blues, UNIVERSES redefines what theater is and who it speaks to. In Live From the Edge, the award-winning ensemble performs a collection of their best work over the past 20 years plus a sampling of their upcoming project featuring the unpublished poetry of August Wilson.

$20 general public
$5 for U students with UCard
$10 for non-U students with school ID
$10 for youth 18 and under
U staff/faculty save 10 percent with UCard

For more information, click here.

 


‘SECRETS OF THE GREATEST SNOW ON EARTH’
Sunday, Dec. 6 | 3-4 p.m.
Marriott Library
greatest-snow-on-earth

The author of “Secretes of the Greatest Snow on Earth,” Dr. Jim Steenburgh, is a professor of meteorology at the University of Utah, with meteorology degrees from Penn State and the University of Washington. He will be discussing his book here at the Gould.

For more information, visit lib.utah.edu.

 

 

 

 

 


INTERGENERATIONAL POVERTY IN UTAH
Monday, Dec. 7 | 3:30-4:30 p.m.

Orson Spencer Hall (OSH), Hinckley Caucus, Room 255
Intergenerational.Poverty
Recent Findings from Department of Workforce Services 2015 Report
John Pierpont – Executive Director, Utah Department of Workforce Services

Casey Cameron – Deputy Director, Utah Department of Workforce Services

Tracy Gruber – Director of the Office of Child Care, Utah Department of Workforce Services,
Senior Advisor of the Intergenerational Poverty Initiative

 

 

 

 


‘GLIMPSE’
Nov. 16 – Jan. 29, 2016
Marriot Library, level four
Glimpse
Rare Books is pleased to support the Book Arts Program with its historic, fine press, and artists’ books collections. “Glimpse” features these and many other book artists represented in our collections.

 

 

 

 


Highlighted Events

INCOME INEQUALITY: SAFETY NETS AND LABOR ORGANIZATION (DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS VISITING SPEAKER SERIES)

Monday, Nov. 30| 3:30-5 p.m.
USTAR Auditorium, SMBB 2650

At this event, Sheldon Danzinger from the Russell Sage Foundation will present “Can the US Reduce Poverty and Inequality without a Stronger Safety Net?” and Richard Freeman from Harvard University will present “Can the US Reduce Inequality and Poverty without Strong Labor Organizations?”


PEAK HEALTH AND FITNESS WELLNESS WORKSHOPS FOR THE HOLIDAYSPEAK-Holiday-Wellness-Workshops

NUTRITION

Tuesday, Dec. 1 | 5:15-6:45 p.m.
383 Colorow Road, second floor lunch room

MOVEMENT

Tuesday, Dec. 8 | 5:15-6:45 p.m.
383 Colorow Road, second floor lunch room

PEACE

Tuesday, Dec. 16 | 5:15-6:45 p.m.
383 Colorow Road, second floor lunch room


FACULTY CLUB CHILDREN’S HOLIDAY PARTY
Friday, Dec. 11 | 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Moran Eye Center Auditorium, 65 Mario Capecchi Drive
Free underground parking

Children's-Party.2016
All faculty and their families, especially children and grandchildren ages 4-12, are invited join the Faculty Club Children’s Holiday Party, featuring Balloon Granny, Jub Jub the clown, a craft booth, face painting, photos, holiday treats, and a special visit from you-know-who. The event is free for Faculty Club members and $10 per family for nonmembers. Tickets may be purchased at the door. Reservations are required. Call 801-581-5203 or email shawnee.worsley@utah.edu to make reservations.

All faculty are invited to join the Faculty Club for just $5 per month. Members have access to monthly socials, discounted hotel rooms at the Marriott University Park, discounted theatre and museum tickets with group gatherings before or after, discounted basketball and volleyball tickets with pregame pizza parties, the family holiday party, access to the Faculty Club cabin and more.


‘GLIMPSE’
Nov. 16 – Jan. 29, 2016
Marriot Library, level four
Glimpse
Rare Books is pleased to support the Book Arts Program with its historic, fine press, and artists’ books collections. “Glimpse” features these and many other book artists represented in our collections.

 

 

 

 


A Healthier U

GET MOVING TO MANAGE STRESS

You know that exercise is good for your health, but your life is too busy to fit physical activity into your routine. Hold that thought — there’s good news when it comes to exercise and stress.

Any form of exercise, from walking to zumba, can act as a stress reliever. You don’t need to be an athlete to make physical activity part of your stress management plan. 

PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND STRESS RELIEF

Physical movement improves your overall health and your sense of well-being, which puts more pep in your step every day. Exercise also has some direct stress-relieving benefits.

  • Exercise releases endorphins. Physical activity helps increase the production of your brain’s feel-good neurotransmitters, endorphins. Although this is often referred to as a runner’s high, a game of tennis or a hike also can contribute to this same feeling.
  • Physical activity is meditation in motion. Concentrating on your body’s movements can help you to forget the day’s irritations. As you make daily movement a priority the resulting energy and optimism can help you remain calm and clear in everything you do.
  • Movement improves your mood. Regular exercise can increase self-confidence, it can help you relax, and it can decrease the symptoms associated with mild depression and anxiety. Exercise can also improve your sleep, which is often disrupted by stress, depression and anxiety. All of these exercise benefits can ease your stress levels and give you a sense of command over your body and your life.  

PEAK university employee fitness classes are available to U employees and their family members. Visit health.utah.edu/peak  to register.

HealthFeedWATCH WHERE YOU’RE WALKING
Walking
We all know about the dangers of distracted driving, but what about distracted walking? Well, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but distracted walking is a real thing, and it’s causing serious bodily harm to pedestrians.

According to the CDC, the problem is vast.  In 2012, 4,743 pedestrians were killed in traffic crashes in the United States, and another 76,000 pedestrians were injured.

Read the full article here.

EYE ON DIABETES
cataract1
If you are one of the 29 million people in the U.S. affected by diabetes, you probably know that you are at risk for eye disease. If this is news to you, don’t panic, but do be aware of the risks. The good news is, most diabetic eye disease can be treated before it causes vision loss.

Click here to read the story.

For more expert health news and information, visit healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed.