Announcements

UMFA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ONE OF UTAH BUSINESS MAGAZINE’S “30 WOMEN TO WATCH”

Gretchen Dietrich, executive director of the Utah Museum of Fine Arts at the University of Utah, wasDietrich honored this month as one of Utah Business magazine’s 2015 “30 Women to Watch.” The magazine’s annual recognition program spotlights women business leaders who have distinguished themselves across a diverse range of fields, from banking to healthcare.

Since Dietrich was appointed UMFA’s executive director in 2010, she has led the Museum’s evolution in virtually every category: establishing financial stability; increasing revenues from private and public sources; boosting attendance; strengthening the UMFA’s relationship with the University of Utah and the broader community; and establishing partnerships and securing support from such world-recognized institutions as The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, the Hearst Foundation, and the Dia Art Foundation. Last year, she was one of 39 senior museum professionals accepted into the highly competitive and prestigious 2014 Getty Leadership Institute—the first museum executive selected from Utah since 1986 and the first woman ever from Utah. In fall 2014, she was invited into the National Art Strategies’ chief executive program, which brings together 50 international executives to explore community impact, place-making, community collaboration and innovation. She was also recently appointed to sit on Dean Raymond Tymas-Jones’ cabinet for the University of Utah College of Fine Arts.


KUER’S STEVE WILLIAMS ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT

Music director and jazz host Steve Williams announced his retirement from the University of Utah. Steve Williams KUERWilliams has hosted the Nighttime Jazz music program on KUER public radio since 1984. His last day on-air will be June 30, 2015.

John Greene, KUER’s General Manager, says Steve’s retirement marks the end of an era, “Over the past 30-plus years, Steve has shared his encyclopedic knowledge and love of jazz music with listeners in Utah and surrounding states. He introduced all of us to the best of the best in this uniquely American art form.”

Born in Manhattan’s theater district at the end of World War II to a mother who was a singer and dancer and a father who was a professional musician in the big band era, Williams says he was essentially “sentenced to a lifetime of music.” With his father’s woodwinds strewn throughout the house, Williams started playing the clarinet and saxophone. “My dad, Murray Williams, was a horn player. He lived in New York and played gigs with Charlie Parker, Gene Krupa and Joe Venuti, among others.”
Steve Williams with DadWilliams studied music at the University of Utah. In 1979 he became a volunteer board operator with KUER and was hired as music director and weekday jazz host in 1984. Throughout the past 30 years, Williams has been the voice of jazz music in Utah. He’s hosted concerts and music series throughout the state and emceed jazz festivals nationally, including Detroit, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Telluride.

Williams’ unwavering support of Utah’s jazz community includes collaborations with non-profits and schools, interviews with up-and-coming musicians and featuring albums by lesser known musicians and acts. Williams has also been actively involved in the national and international scenes as well, interviewing such legends as Sonny Rollins, Herbie Hancock and Lionel Hampton.

Williams looks forward to spending time with his wife, Vicki, “I’ve been at it for over 30 years, and I’ve loved every minute of it. But I’ll turn 70 next year, and my wife is looking forward to having me home each night. She’s as ready as I am to begin this next chapter of our lives.”

Williams intends to stay connected with the musicians and organizations that make up Utah’s vibrant Steve Williams KUER 2jazz community, “We’re very lucky to live in such a rich jazz culture here. I’m so grateful to everyone who has supported me over the years.”
KUER is partnering with Excellence in the Community to host a free jazz concert in celebration of Steve Williams’ tenure at the University of Utah on Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 7:30 p.m. at the Gallivan Center in Salt Lake City featuring the Corey Christiansen Organ Trio.

KUER 90.1, a charter member of National Public Radio, broadcasts from the Eccles Broadcast Center at The University of Utah. KUER provides a commercial-free mix of programming to more than 150,000 weekly listeners across eighty percent of the state. KUER and its HD channels can be streamed online at kuer.org and with KUER’s mobile app for iPhone, iPad, and Android.


2015-2016 RESEARCH FELLOWS

The Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah is proud to announce its 2015-2016 research fellows. This annual program awards funds to selected U faculty and external scholars, enabling them to conduct research that transcends traditional departmental boundaries.

VIRGIL D. ALDRICH FACULTY FELLOWS

Maeera Schreiber, associate professor of English
Project Title: “Holy Envy: Poetry, Modernism and the Judeo-Christian Border Zone”

Hugh Cagle, assistant professor of history
Project Title: “A Global History of Disease: Diagnostic Language and Leprosy in the Early Modern World”

Katherine Coles, professor of English
Project Title: “Poem, Image, Mage”

Eric Hinderaker, professor of history
Project Title: “Boston’s Massacre: Military-Civilian Relations in an Anglo-American Community

OBERT C. & GRACE A. TANNER HUMANITIES CENTER VISITING FELLOWS

David Kieran, Department of History, Skidmore College
Project Title: “Signature Wounds: The Cultural Politics of Mental Health During the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars”

Martin Padget, Department of English, Aberystwyth University, Wales
Project Title: “Paul Strand: Photography, Modernism and the World”


YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN
Charlie Brown
Buy your tickets now for “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” at the Babcock Theatre June 11-21.

Charles Schulz’s treasured comic comes to life in Clark Gesner’s classic musical, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” Come spend a day in the life of the famous comic strip hero, Charlie Brown as he searches for what it means to be a good person, finding unexpected answers from his friends, Schroeder, Linus, Sally, Lucy and Snoopy. Whether you’re keen to fly with the Red Baron, moon over the Moonlight Sonata or just do your best to find happiness,”You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” is a crowd-pleasing classic.

Click here for more information and to buy tickets.

For directions to the theatre and more information on parking including printable maps, click here.

 

Campus Events

MONDAY FAMILY NIGHTS

Free with Regular Garden Admission / Garden Members free

ATOPFilled with the music and dance of cultural groups found right here in Utah. Bring a picnic and blanket to enjoy a performance at either 6 p.m or 7 p.m., and be sure to stop by our exploration station to share in a garden related craft or activity to wrap up your evening.

  • June 1         Ailine’s Touch of Polynesia (ATOP)
  • June 8         Divya School of Dance
  • July 6          Samba Fogo
  • July 13        Municipal Ballet Co. & Holy Water Buffalo
  • Aug. 3         Yunuen Carrillo, Mariachi Alma de México de Utah, & Ballet Viva el Folklore
  • Aug. 10       Scariff School of Irish Dance

All events will be held in the Red Butte Garden Courtyard, behind the Visitor’s Center.

www.redbuttegarden.org/monday-family-night

EARLY MORNING BIRD WATCHING

Regular Garden Admission/ Garden Members Free / Registration required

Bring your binoculars for a guided tour when the Garden is full of wildlife and birds

9-11:30 a.m..

  • Wednesdays: June 3 and 17
  • Saturdays: June 6, 13, 20 and 27

ART EXHIBITS

Regular Garden Admission / Garden Members Free

  • May 29 – June 21

EXHIBIT: Art At The Main (multiple artists)

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

Class & workshop prices vary, check our website for more info: www.redbuttegarden.org

Registration is required. More classes and workshops available all summer.

PHOTOGRAPHING FLOWERS

June 6 from noon-5 p.m.

Learn how to properly compose the subject, manipulate lighting, and set your camera to take photos of plants and flowers.

FOR THE KIDS

LIL’ BUDS CAMP – New this year

Wednesdays from 10:30 a.m.- noon

A fun, early summer camp experience created specifically for 3 and 4 year olds to make new friends, prepare for the upcoming school year, and explore the world of plants. All classes designed for caregivers to attend and participate with their Lil’ Bud.

Garden Members $24 / General Pubic $30.  Register by phone at: 801-581-8454 or online at: www.redbuttegarden.org/lil-buds

  • June 3 – Sensational Senses
  • June 10 – Sound
  • June 17 – Touch
  • June 24 – Smell

 GARDEN ADVENTURES

Saturdays from 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Garden Adventures are Saturday kid’s classes held in Em’s Sprout House. Ages 4-12 are welcome with a caregiver. Registration not required for caregiver. No infants please.

Garden members $5  / General public $7.  Register by phone at 801-581-8454 or online at: www.redbuttegarden.org/garden-adventures

  • June 6 – Junior Apothecary
  • June 20 – Sensational Summer Solstice

SUMMER CAMP REGISTRATION – It’s not too late to sign up!

Sign up your kindergarteners to sixth graders for a week-long-summer camp.  Half-day and full-day camps available. Prices vary per camp.

Call 801-581-8454 or www.redbuttegarden.org/summer-camp

 2015 OUTDOOR CONCERT SERIES

For the current concert line up or to purchase concert tickets please visit:

www.redbuttegarden.org/concerts


 SALTDANCEFEST 2015

The Best Come West

SaltDanceFest 2015 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers along with esteemed University of Utah faculty Eric Handman and Stephen Koester for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the lively exchange of ideas, June 1–12.

Participants will work intimately with acclaimed artists, developing and exploring ideas in dance and choreography. There are several opportunities that are open to the public. See the full list below. All events are located at the Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East.

SaltDanceFestDrop-in classes, June 1 – 5 and 8 – 12
$20 per class at the door (space permitting)
Paul Matteson – Technique, 9:30 – 11:20 a.m.
Molly Heller – Somatics, 9:30 – 11:20 a.m.
Jesse Zaritt – Technique, 11:30 – 1:30 p.m.

June 2 – Artist Talk with Paul Matteson, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 3 – Artist Talk with Sara Shelton Mann, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 4 – Artist Talk with Jesse Zaritt, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 5 – Improv Jam, $10 at the door, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
June 9 – Open Forum Showing, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 10 – Artists’ Panel Discussion, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 11 – Artists’ Concert, free, 7 p.m.
June 12 – Festival Concert, free, 7 p.m.
For more details, application information, and artist bios, visit saltdancefest.com.


OUR AMERICA: THE LATINO PRESENCE IN AMERICAN ART

Extended through June 28
Utah Museum of Fine Arts
Our America EXTENDED

“Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art” from the Smithsonian American Art Museum is currently on view at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts and has been extended through June 28, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Highlighted Events

MONDAY FAMILY NIGHTS

Free with Regular Garden Admission / Garden Members free

ATOPFilled with the music and dance of cultural groups found right here in Utah. Bring a picnic and blanket to enjoy a performance at either 6 p.m or 7 p.m., and be sure to stop by our exploration station to share in a garden related craft or activity to wrap up your evening.

  • June 1         Ailine’s Touch of Polynesia (ATOP)
  • June 8         Divya School of Dance
  • July 6          Samba Fogo
  • July 13        Municipal Ballet Co. & Holy Water Buffalo
  • Aug. 3         Yunuen Carrillo, Mariachi Alma de México de Utah, & Ballet Viva el Folklore
  • Aug. 10       Scariff School of Irish Dance

All events will be held in the Red Butte Garden Courtyard, behind the Visitor’s Center.

www.redbuttegarden.org/monday-family-night

EARLY MORNING BIRD WATCHING

Regular Garden Admission/ Garden Members Free / Registration required

Bring your binoculars for a guided tour when the Garden is full of wildlife and birds

9-11:30 a.m..

  • Wednesdays: June 3 and 17
  • Saturdays: June 6, 13, 20 and 27

ART EXHIBITS

Regular Garden Admission / Garden Members Free

  • May 29 – June 21

EXHIBIT: Art At The Main (multiple artists)

CLASSES & WORKSHOPS

Class & workshop prices vary, check our website for more info: www.redbuttegarden.org

Registration is required. More classes and workshops available all summer.

PHOTOGRAPHING FLOWERS

June 6 from noon-5 p.m.

Learn how to properly compose the subject, manipulate lighting, and set your camera to take photos of plants and flowers.

FOR THE KIDS

LIL’ BUDS CAMP – New this year

Wednesdays from 10:30 a.m.- noon

A fun, early summer camp experience created specifically for 3 and 4 year olds to make new friends, prepare for the upcoming school year, and explore the world of plants. All classes designed for caregivers to attend and participate with their Lil’ Bud.

Garden Members $24 / General Pubic $30.  Register by phone at: 801-581-8454 or online at: www.redbuttegarden.org/lil-buds

  • June 3 – Sensational Senses
  • June 10 – Sound
  • June 17 – Touch
  • June 24 – Smell

 GARDEN ADVENTURES

Saturdays from 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Garden Adventures are Saturday kid’s classes held in Em’s Sprout House. Ages 4-12 are welcome with a caregiver. Registration not required for caregiver. No infants please.

Garden members $5  / General public $7.  Register by phone at 801-581-8454 or online at: www.redbuttegarden.org/garden-adventures

  • June 6 – Junior Apothecary
  • June 20 – Sensational Summer Solstice

SUMMER CAMP REGISTRATION – It’s not too late to sign up!

Sign up your kindergarteners to sixth graders for a week-long-summer camp.  Half-day and full-day camps available. Prices vary per camp.

Call 801-581-8454 or www.redbuttegarden.org/summer-camp

 2015 OUTDOOR CONCERT SERIES

For the current concert line up or to purchase concert tickets please visit:

www.redbuttegarden.org/concerts


 SALTDANCEFEST 2015

The Best Come West

SaltDanceFest 2015 brings together internationally renowned dance artists and dance makers along with esteemed University of Utah faculty Eric Handman and Stephen Koester for two weeks of moving, collaborating, dance making and the lively exchange of ideas, June 1–12.

Participants will work intimately with acclaimed artists, developing and exploring ideas in dance and choreography. There are several opportunities that are open to the public. See the full list below. All events are located at the Marriott Center for Dance, 330 S. 1500 East.

SaltDanceFestDrop-in classes, June 1 – 5 and 8 – 12
$20 per class at the door (space permitting)
Paul Matteson – Technique, 9:30 – 11:20 a.m.
Molly Heller – Somatics, 9:30 – 11:20 a.m.
Jesse Zaritt – Technique, 11:30 – 1:30 p.m.

June 2 – Artist Talk with Paul Matteson, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 3 – Artist Talk with Sara Shelton Mann, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 4 – Artist Talk with Jesse Zaritt, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 5 – Improv Jam, $10 at the door, 6:30 – 8 p.m.
June 9 – Open Forum Showing, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 10 – Artists’ Panel Discussion, free, 6:30 p.m.
June 11 – Artists’ Concert, free, 7 p.m.
June 12 – Festival Concert, free, 7 p.m.
For more details, application information, and artist bios, visit saltdancefest.com.


OUR AMERICA: THE LATINO PRESENCE IN AMERICAN ART

Extended through June 28
Utah Museum of Fine Arts
Our America EXTENDED

“Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art” from the Smithsonian American Art Museum is currently on view at the Utah Museum of Fine Arts and has been extended through June 28, 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Student Life

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN
Charlie Brown
Buy your tickets now for “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” at the Babcock Theatre June 11-21.

Charles Schulz’s treasured comic comes to life in Clark Gesner’s classic musical, “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.” Come spend a day in the life of the famous comic strip hero, Charlie Brown as he searches for what it means to be a good person, finding unexpected answers from his friends, Schroeder, Linus, Sally, Lucy and Snoopy. Whether you’re keen to fly with the Red Baron, moon over the Moonlight Sonata or just do your best to find happiness,”You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown” is a crowd-pleasing classic.

Click here for more information and to buy tickets.

For directions to the theatre and more information on parking including printable maps, click here.

 


LEARNING ABROAD INSTAGRAM CONTEST

University of Utah Learning Abroad students who have participated in 2014-2015 term programs can participate in the Summer 2015 Instagram Challenge. Students can post photos of their travels abroad and win weekly prizes and the grand-prize winner will receive a GoPro Camera. Visit learningabroad.utah.edu for more information. Follow U adventures abroad by searching #UtahAbroad on Instagram.

 

 

 

 

 

 


KUER’S STEVE WILLIAMS ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT

Music director and jazz host Steve Williams announced his retirement from the University of Utah. Steve Williams KUERWilliams has hosted the Nighttime Jazz music program on KUER public radio since 1984. His last day on-air will be June 30, 2015.

John Greene, KUER’s General Manager, says Steve’s retirement marks the end of an era, “Over the past 30-plus years, Steve has shared his encyclopedic knowledge and love of jazz music with listeners in Utah and surrounding states. He introduced all of us to the best of the best in this uniquely American art form.”

Born in Manhattan’s theater district at the end of World War II to a mother who was a singer and dancer and a father who was a professional musician in the big band era, Williams says he was essentially “sentenced to a lifetime of music.” With his father’s woodwinds strewn throughout the house, Williams started playing the clarinet and saxophone. “My dad, Murray Williams, was a horn player. He lived in New York and played gigs with Charlie Parker, Gene Krupa and Joe Venuti, among others.”
Steve Williams with DadWilliams studied music at the University of Utah. In 1979 he became a volunteer board operator with KUER and was hired as music director and weekday jazz host in 1984. Throughout the past 30 years, Williams has been the voice of jazz music in Utah. He’s hosted concerts and music series throughout the state and emceed jazz festivals nationally, including Detroit, Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Telluride.

Williams’ unwavering support of Utah’s jazz community includes collaborations with non-profits and schools, interviews with up-and-coming musicians and featuring albums by lesser known musicians and acts. Williams has also been actively involved in the national and international scenes as well, interviewing such legends as Sonny Rollins, Herbie Hancock and Lionel Hampton.

Williams looks forward to spending time with his wife, Vicki, “I’ve been at it for over 30 years, and I’ve loved every minute of it. But I’ll turn 70 next year, and my wife is looking forward to having me home each night. She’s as ready as I am to begin this next chapter of our lives.”

Williams intends to stay connected with the musicians and organizations that make up Utah’s vibrant Steve Williams KUER 2jazz community, “We’re very lucky to live in such a rich jazz culture here. I’m so grateful to everyone who has supported me over the years.”
KUER is partnering with Excellence in the Community to host a free jazz concert in celebration of Steve Williams’ tenure at the University of Utah on Thursday, June 25, 2015 at 7:30 p.m. at the Gallivan Center in Salt Lake City featuring the Corey Christiansen Organ Trio.

KUER 90.1, a charter member of National Public Radio, broadcasts from the Eccles Broadcast Center at The University of Utah. KUER provides a commercial-free mix of programming to more than 150,000 weekly listeners across eighty percent of the state. KUER and its HD channels can be streamed online at kuer.org and with KUER’s mobile app for iPhone, iPad, and Android.


2015-2016 RESEARCH FELLOWS

The Tanner Humanities Center at the University of Utah is proud to announce its 2015-2016 research fellows. This annual program awards funds to selected U faculty and external scholars, enabling them to conduct research that transcends traditional departmental boundaries.

VIRGIL D. ALDRICH FACULTY FELLOWS

Maeera Schreiber, associate professor of English
Project Title: “Holy Envy: Poetry, Modernism and the Judeo-Christian Border Zone”

Hugh Cagle, assistant professor of history
Project Title: “A Global History of Disease: Diagnostic Language and Leprosy in the Early Modern World”

Katherine Coles, professor of English
Project Title: “Poem, Image, Mage”

Eric Hinderaker, professor of history
Project Title: “Boston’s Massacre: Military-Civilian Relations in an Anglo-American Community

OBERT C. & GRACE A. TANNER HUMANITIES CENTER VISITING FELLOWS

David Kieran, Department of History, Skidmore College
Project Title: “Signature Wounds: The Cultural Politics of Mental Health During the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars”

Martin Padget, Department of English, Aberystwyth University, Wales
Project Title: “Paul Strand: Photography, Modernism and the World”

 

Benefiting U

 JUNE WELLU COOKING CLASS

Join the Benefits Department and Chef Carl for hot and cold quinoa recipes.  For dessert he will make his famous Irish Whiskey Chocolate Cake.

This month’s cooking class will be held on Monday, June 8, 2015 from 6-8 p.m. at thquinoae Salt Lake Culinary Center (2233 S. 300 East).  The cost is $20 per person, which includes the class and the meal for each participant. Payment method is a one time, automatic payroll deductionRegistered employees will be charged for the class regardless of attendance.

Class registration is open.  Click here to register.

Classes are limited to 30 and fill quickly. If you would like to register for more than one person please register yourself twice. Limit: Two registrations per person.

*This cooking class is sponsored by WellU; however, attendance does not count toward fulfilling the requirements for the WellU Discount.  For information on WellU, please see the Program Requirements brochure.


BENEFITS ANNUAL OPEN ENROLLMENT
Benefiting U
Benefits annual open enrollment is open now through June 7. Open enrollment packets have been mailed to all employees and should have already arrived. All documents are now available on the benefits department’s website at hr.utah.edu/benefits/oe. This year we have a new online enrollment tool for employees, called UBenefits, to view or update health plan elections and enroll in the FSA/HSA plans for the new plan year.

Open enrollment sessions will be held during the first week of June.

 

 

A Healthier U

 STAYING HEALTHY AFTER A BREAK-UP

By Chris Dilley

There’s no doubt that our physical health is often influenced by our mental and emotional health. Research shows that depression has been linked to a number of physical ailments such as migraines, headaches, back pain, digestive issues and many others.

The end of a relationship can often create a sense of loss that if unchecked, can lead to a serious bout of depression. Whether you’re going through a break-up or a divorce, the emotional fallout can be as devastating as the death of a loved one.

It’s important to take steps to protect your physical health during this time. Here are some simple things you can do to stay healthy after a break-up.

Don’t stop moving.

Exercise is a great way to combat depression. Raising your heart rate will cause your brain to release endorphins, chemicals that act as analgesics, which in turn diminish the perception of pain within the body.

Take stock.

Reflecting on your relationship in a healthy and constructive way can actually help you move forward in life.

Consider the following questions:

  • What would you differently if you could do the last relationship over again?
  • Did you learn anything from the last relationship?
  • What do you want out of future relationships?

Positive reflection will help you process the relationship while ensuring that your next relationship is better than the last.

Take a break.

People aren’t interchangeable and going from one relationship to another without taking the time to process your feelings, can lead to further emotional fallout. Bruce Etringer, Ph.D. and pain management specialist says, “Feelings are like tires. Even if you bury them deep, they’ll eventually rise to the surface.” Allow yourself time to grieve the end of your relationship. It’s important to fully heal before moving on.

Be you.

Often in relationships, we find ourselves putting what we enjoy on the back burner in order to make time for someone else’s needs. Now is a great time to get back to being you. Do what you enjoy. Spend time with friends and have fun whenever you can. Reconnect with yourself and the people who care most about you. A good support system can help mitigate even the worst of situations.

The end of a relationship doesn’t have to be about loss. It can be about creating a whole new beginning for a happier you.

HealthFeed

THE FACTS ABOUT ANTHRAX

The mention of anthrax causes instant panic. Reports out this week that the U.S. military inadvertently sent samples of live anthrax out to nine locations around the globe has people asking if a global health crisis is looming. “That is highly unlikely,” says Sankar Swaminathan, M.D., Chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases for University of Utah Health Care. “First of all, the government has reported all samples of live Bacillus anthracis bacteria, which causes anthrax, have been secured. Second, anthrax is only caused by direct contact with the bacteria; it is not contagious and cannot be spread from person-to-person like a cold or the flu.”

Click here to read the full story.

For more expert health news and information, visit healthcare.utah.edu/healthfeed.

5 WAYS YOU CAN HELP A TEEN HAVE A BETTER BODY IMAGE

Whether you remember your teenage years with a shudder or appreciation, we all know how vulnerable teenagers are when it comes to body image.

Fast Stats

Just a few quick statistics about our teenagers and their body image and self-esteem today:

  • Among high school students, 44 percent of girls and 15 percent of guys are attempting to lose weight.1
  • Seventy-five percent of girls with low self-esteem reported engaging in negative activities like cutting, bullying, smoking, drinking, or disordered eating. This compares to 25 percent of girls with high self-esteem.2
  • More than 40 percent of boys in middle school and high school regularly exercise with the goal of increasing muscle mass.3
  • A girl’s self-esteem is more strongly related to how she views her own body shape and body weight, than how much she actually weighs.4
  • 61 percent of teen girls with low self-esteem admit to talking badly about themselves (compared to 15 percent of girls with high self-esteem).2

It seems the best thing we can do for our teens is to help them focus on more than just appearance.Pediatrician Cindy Gellner says: “Let your child know that you love them for who they are rather than how they look.” To do this, here are five ways to help your teens have a better body image.

Click here to read the full story and find citations.

Construction & Commuter Updates

NEW:
– On June 2 from 6 am to 3 pm a southbound lane on North Campus Drive will reduce to one lane for the demolition and construction of a new bus stop on the east side of the Kennecott building.
– The sidewalk to the west of Eyring Chemistry will be closed for repairs beginning June 1. The sidewalk will reopen by June 6. Pedestrians will be able to easily navigate the area by taking the sidewalk slightly to the west along the back of Pioneer Memorial Theatre.
– Campus Center Drive (the Business Loop) closed to through traffic Monday, May 11 and will remain closed for summer construction as work completes on the Central Parking Garage. The pay lot to the south of the Spencer Fox Eccles Business Building transitions to a temporary “A” lot and will remain open and accessible. A plaza and roundabout system will be constructed on Campus Center Drive. The road will be open in August.
– The south entrance to HPER West and the sidewalk near the door to HPER West are now open. Landscaping continues in this area. The sidewalk will close again after commencement.
– If you see a sprinkler that is damaged or spraying in the wrong direction, please call dispatch at 801-581-7221 and alert Facilities to the concern.

ONGOING:

Parking

–      Construction on the new Lassonde Studios began Nov. 1, 2014. The building will be located to the northeast of the Languages and Communication building (LNCO) and southeast of the Tanner Humanities Building. About 300 parking stalls will be eliminated. The project will be installing approximately 140 new stalls.

–      Construction of the new S.J. Quinney College of Law that began in spring 2013 will be winding down. A majority of the parking stalls that were affected by the project have been returned to service. This summer the contractor’s trailers will be removed and the final number of stalls returned. As part of the project, the number of stalls in this area will increase.

–      A project to upgrade the Ivor Thomas labs in the Mining Systems Research Lab began in mid-June 2014. The parking lot to the west will be closed to the public through June 1, 2015.

–      Twenty parking spaces on the west end and 10 spaces on the northeast corner of the parking lot to the north of Merrill Engineering will be closed as part of a staging area for campus construction projects. The parking spaces in the northeast corner will be unavailable through 2016.

–      Construction for the new Jon M. and Karen Huntsman Basketball Training Facility began to the north of the Huntsman Center. Forty parking stalls in the northeast corner of the parking lot east of the Huntsman Center will be closed to serve as staging for construction materials.

Roads

–     The Business Loop is currently closed. The pay lot remains open though it becomes a temporary “A” lot for the summer. Please proceed with great caution as extensive work continues in the area.

Public Transportation

–      The campus shuttle and UTA bus stop at the Field House will be closed for the duration of construction on the S. J. Quinney College of Law building (through early 2015). Instead, use the existing stop around the corner on University Street to catch red and green shuttles.

Sidewalks and Pedestrian Traffic

–      The south entrance to the law building remains closed for the duration of construction (through early 2015). The sidewalk on the north side of the law building is open and has been reconstructed to be accessible for people with disabilities.

Construction and New Buildings

– Repairs are underway on the sidewalk at the east end of the Business Loop. The area at the bottom of the stairs leading up to the north west corner of the Huntsman Center is being renovated. This area is tightly constricted and a heavy machinery associated with the Central Parking Garage construction moves through the area frequently. The area will be fully repaired for the beginning of fall semester. Please consider using the sidewalk system near the Huntsman Arena and between the HPER buildings to move more easily between the South Campus TRAX stop and main campus.

– On Monday, May 11 construction began at the Rice-Eccles Stadium to add additional restrooms on the concourse level of the north west and north east corner of the stadium. This area is fenced though pedestrian impacts are minimal.

–    Construction on the North Campus Connecting Element is currently underway to provide a fully ADA accessible link between main campus and the Rio Tinto Kennecott Mechanical Engineering Building (MEK).This project also includes a new bus shelter and vehicular pullout to further enhance functionality, safety and traffic flow in the area. Please be aware there will be periodic lane closures on North Campus Drive at the intersection of 100 South. For more project details, click here and to view the construction impacts, go here.

–      Construction is nearly complete on the new outdoor tennis courts, located west of the George S. Eccles Tennis Center. The six court tennis center will complete in May and dedication is scheduled for June 1.

–      The Critical Infrastructure Project is currently underway in the Health Sciences area of campus and to the south of the new Ambulatory Care Complex. Construction for this project on main campus is happening to the east of University Street near Pioneer Memorial Theatre, to the south of the Sill Center, to the west of honors housing, to the east of the Annex, by Rice-Eccles Stadium and on lower campus.

–      Construction on the Northwest Parking Garage, located between the Naval Sciences and Sutton buildings on 100 South, is underway. The garage is scheduled to open in Fall 2015. Accessible parking and pedestrian routes through the area will remain open. For a comprehensive map of parking alternatives, click here.

–      Construction began on the 800-stall Business Loop Parking Garage in late June 2014. The garage will be complete in the summer of 2015. Alternative parking options are listed here. The playfield on top of the garage will be complete for the start of the 2015 fall semester.

–      The second phase of the expansion and renovation of the Kennecott Building is scheduled for completion in May 2015. This includes work on the east side of North Campus Drive as the sidewalks are reconfigured to incorporate the elevated walkway.

–      The S. J. Quinney College of Law building is scheduled for completion during the summer of 2015.


More Information

–      There have been many parking changes on campus this year while two parking garages are constructed in place of current surface lots. To learn more about parking and other transportation options, click here.

–      A map of construction zones and time frames is available here.

–      For more information on current or upcoming projects click here.

–      Connect with Facilities Management on Facebook or Twitter.

–      Connect with Commuter Services on Facebook and Twitter.

–      Visit Commuter Services’ website for detailed information about parking, alternative transportation, construction impacts, events and more.


Kingsbury Hall Presents becomes UtahPresents

By Sheri Jardine

Since 2001, Kingsbury Hall Presents has offered an eclectic season of performing artists at Kingsbury Hall on the University of Utah campus. As part of an expanded mission that reaches beyond the boundaries of the Kingsbury Hall stage into other venues and spaces on campus and in the community, the performing arts series has become UtahPresents. This evolution and expansion will infuse the campus and community with unique arts experiences through both live performances and community engagement activities.

15-16UPbrochurecover“The expanded mission of UtahPresents is to provide an abundance of creative and cultural experiences for the campus and regional community,” said Brooke Horejsi, executive director of UtahPresents and assistant dean for art and creative engagement for the College of Fine Arts. “Kingsbury Hall, the historic venue, and Kingsbury Hall Presents provide us with a strong foundation for this evolution. We are thrilled to announce a new name along with a new season of exciting performances in multiple venues, amazing connections between artists and community members and a diversity of partnerships to deepen our impact.”

A highlight of the upcoming season includes “Mercy Killers,” a one-man show in partnership with the School of Medicine’s Division of Medical Ethics and Humanities that will engage both medical students and the public in dialogue about end-of-life decisions and the cost of health care in America. Another highlight will be an evening with tap legend Savion Glover, in concert with Jack DeJohnette, one of the most influential jazz drummers of his time, in a thrilling performance of percussion and rhythm. Prior to the public performance, Glover will work with junior high students and DeJohnette will share his time and talent with jazz students.

Student attendance at U arts events on campus has skyrocketed in recent years, illuminating a growing thirst for exploration via the arts.

“By providing our students access to a diverse array of live performances, discussions and engaged learning experiences, UtahPresents will help enhance creative thinking, cultivate curiosity and foster collaboration,” said Ruth Watkins, senior vice president for academic affairs. “By engaging in these opportunities, students can be inspired to think creatively about their academic and career goals and to find innovative solutions to complex problems.”

CarollSpinneyThe UtahPresents season begins on Sept. 19, 2015, as the new home of TEDx SaltLakeCity, an all-day event filled with speakers focused on a theme of Upcycled Thinking “Ideas Worth Spreading.” The season also includes Irish musical group Danú giving audiences a taste of Christmas in Ireland, a screening of the documentary “I am Big Bird,” with a Q&A with Caroll Spinney, the man who has been the heart and voice of Big Bird for more than 40 years, and globalFEST, one of the most popular global music festivals in the country.

“UtahPresents will enrich our community through creative and cultural experiences, sharing a global perspective for regular patrons of the arts and novices alike,” said Raymond Tymas-Jones, associate vice president for the arts and dean of the College of Fine Arts. “This infusion of the arts across campus, and into the surrounding community, serves to ensure that what takes place is about more than entertainment – it  is also about the value that creativity and the arts bring to our communities.”

UtahPresents 2015-16 Season:

Early Bird tickets for the UtahPresents 2015-16 season will go on sale Monday, June 8 at 10 a.m. Multi-show discounts are available – purchase tickets for three performances to save 10 percent, or purchase five performances to save 20 percent. No handling or facility fees will be charged during Early Bird sales period, which ends on August 17. Additional information is available by calling 801-581-7100 or visiting utahpresents.org.

TEDxSaltLakeCity – Saturday, Sept. 19, 9 a.m.–4 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall (not available with Early Bird sales or multi-show discounts, tickets on sale, July 20)

Mnozil Brass – Sunday, Oct. 18, 6:30 p.m. at Libby Gardner Concert Hall, in conjunction with the Virtuoso Concert Series

“Mercy Killers” – Friday, Nov. 6, 7:00 p.m. at Eccles Auditorium at Huntsman Cancer Institute, in partnership with the Division of Medical Ethics and Humanities

“Miss Nelson is Missing” – performed by University of Utah Youth Theatre, Friday, Nov. 13, 7 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 14, 11 a.m.* at Kingsbury Hall
*11 a.m. performance is a sensory-friendly performance. Visit the website for details.

Universes: Live From the Edge – Saturday, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

Danú: A Christmas Gathering – Friday, Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

“Hello, Dolly!” – performed by the University of Utah Department of Theatre, Friday–Sunday, Jan. 15–17, times vary, at Kingsbury Hall

Northwest Dance Project – Friday, Jan. 22, 7:30 p.m. at Marriott Center for Dance

“I am Big Bird: The Caroll Spinney Story” – followed by live Q&A with Caroll Spinney, Friday, Jan. 29, 7:30 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

Tian Jianan – Tuesday, Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m. at Libby Gardner Concert Hall, in partnership with the Confucius Institute

Timber! Cirque Alfonse – Thursday, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

Banff Film Festival – Tuesday–Thursday, Feb. 16-18, 7 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall, in partnership with Campus Recreation Services

Radical Reels – Thursday, Feb. 25, 7 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall, in partnership with Campus Recreation Services

Doktor KaboomAn Evening with Savion Glover and Jack DeJohnette – Wednesday, March 23, 7:30 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

globalFEST On the RoadCreole Carnival – Thursday, March 31, 7:30 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

“Die Fledermaus” – performed by University Lyric Opera Ensemble and Utah Philharmonia – Friday–Saturday,  April 22-23, 7:30 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

Doktor Kaboom! – Thursday, April 28, 7 p.m. at Kingsbury Hall

 
About UtahPresents
For the curious who want to experience artistic creativity pushed beyond the stage, UtahPresents ignites dialogue, explores issues and ideas, catalyzes innovation and connects us.

Sheri Jardine is the communications manager for UtahPresents. Email: sheri.jardine@utah.edu 

CAMPUS EATS: BENTO TRUCK

By Chanapa Tantibanchachai

THE BENTO TRUCK
Marriott Library Plaza
Monday-Friday

11 a.m.-3 p.m.

When I first volunteered to review food trucks for @TheU, I was initially filled with excitement (now I have a real excuse to eat out—who wouldn’t love that?) and slight regret. Regret because I thought this would take a big hit to my wallet. Food trucks, in my mind, are all about overhyped, overpriced, fusion comfort food. The Bento Truck pleasantly proved me wrong.

The menu, like most food trucks, is limited. You could get a regular-sized chicken bowl, a shrimp tempura bowl, a combo bowl, or gyoza bowl for $5.50. A large size of any bowl would cost you roughly $2 more. The menu also offered boxes of each meat, which are larger portions and cost $8.

I ordered the Combo Box, which generously came with two pieces of tempura shrimp, teriyaki chicken, Bento 2a small scoop of wasabi potato salad, three pieces of gyoza, a small container of gyoza dipping sauce, vegetables and a bed of rice. That’s much more food than I would usually order for one meal, but I just had to try a bit of everything…it’s all for the sake of good journalism, right?

I dove into the box cautiously and started off with the chicken teriyaki. The chicken was tender and the teriyaki sauce drizzled over it was just right. The problem I generally find with chicken teriyaki is either too much sauce, which ends up overpowering the chicken, or not enough, and it tastes like regular chicken with a few sad drops of sauce. But not Bento Truck’s chicken teriyaki: The sauce was evenly distributed, the sauce’s consistency was favorable and the flavor packed a punch.

Next up: shrimp tempura. After the trip from the Bento Truck back to my office, as well as the 10 minutes of picture-taking for this article and my Instagram (which I took with my office door closed because I was too embarrassed for anyone to catch me artfully placing the box of food in the perfect lighting for photos), I expected the shrimp to be a bit soggy. Again, Bento Truck proved me wrong. The shrimp tempura came through for me and retained the right amount of crunchiness, even after all the time I took choosing the right Instagram filter to properly display the box.

The most interesting thing in the box was definitely the wasabi potato salad. Just hearing the word “wasabi” struck a bit of fear into my heart and I admit that I started eating the potato salad with an extreme bias against it. My first experience with wasabi was an awful one at a cheap Chinese buffet—need I say more?  However, the potato salad was surprisingly not bad. The wasabi flavor was just strong enough for me to taste its presence, but not so strong as to burn my nose. Did I love it? No. Was it a good, creamy contrast to everything else in the box? I’d say so.

I can’t say I’m a gyoza expert of any kind and honestly just love them so much that I overlook any differences in quality when I eat them at different places. I’d say Bento Truck’s gyoza were pretty standard. I can, however, speak to the gyoza sauce. Generally, gyoza sauces are too bland or sweet for me and I have to add soy sauce, but this one did not require any altering. It was so good, in fact, that I was afraid they didn’t give me enough for my three pieces of gyoza (I like ’em saucy!), but a little goes a long way and I only used a third of the tiny container. I used the rest on my vegetables, because I hate to actually taste my vegetables and try to cover them in as much unhealthy sauces and toppings as possible.

The vegetables included broccoli, bean sprouts, carrots, peas, green beans and something I couldn’t quite distinguish. If I had to give my best guess, I would say it was cauliflower. I’m not very good with vegetables, though, so don’t take my word for it.

All in all, The Bento Truck exceeded my expectations and I would definitely go again. The value you receive for your money is phenomenal, and you won’t break your college budget if you splurge on a $5.50 bowl every now and then. During the summer, the Bento Truck is on campus 11 a.m.-3 p.m. every weekday. During the school year, they close a bit later. An exact time wasn’t given, but it sounds like closing time is flexible and dependent on demand. So no, you can’t skip or leave class early for Bento Truck. It’ll be right there waiting for you with its well-seasoned chicken teriyaki and crispy shrimp tempura.

Chanapa Tantibanchachai is a communications specialist at University Marketing and Communications. If you have an interesting story idea, email her at chanapa.t@utah.edu.

IS YOUR REFRIGERATOR RUNNING?

By Annalisa Purser

Instead of chasing after your refrigerator, it may be time for a more efficient model. The university’s Facilities Energy Management division is now offering departments the opportunity to replace 2001 or older residential grade refrigerators with new Energy Star models that can save hundreds of dollars in energy costs over its lifetime.

Energy Management will contribute up to five times the annual energy cost savings toward the purchase of a new refrigerator/freezer. The savings could pay anywhere from 50 to 100 percent of the cost of the new one depending on the age and energy use of the refrigerator. Additionally, if a department can decommission an old refrigerator without replacing it for at least three years, a $250 incentive is available, and Energy Management will pay for the disposal of the old refrigerator. The decommissioning rebate is available for lab-grade refrigerators and ultra-low freezers as well. Personal refrigerators on campus are not eligible for this program.

The Department of Biology piloted the program this past spring and identified an old, leaky fridge that was using 10 times more energy each year compared to a new one. The five-year energy savings was $865, which was more than enough to replace the refrigerator with a newer model and save the university $173 per year in electricity costs just from that refrigerator.

“We’re targeting older refrigerators across campus because they are big energy wasters,” said Stephanie Dolmat-Connell, sustainability manager for U Facilities. “This is an easy way for departments to make a big difference on campus.”

Once a refrigerator is identified for the program, Energy Management will collect data about the current energy use for a few weeks in order to determine the energy cost savings of converting to a newer model. This information will be used to calculate the grant amount available for the department to purchase a new refrigerator.

To participate in the program, email energystar@fm.utah.edu with your name, contact information and location of the refrigerator you wish to replace or decommission. Energy Management will then contact you to schedule a time to log data on the current refrigerator. Energy Management will also assist in the purchase of the new model and recycle the old refrigerator.

@HOME TIP
Print
Have an old refrigerator at home that you want to replace with a newer, energy-efficient model? Rocky Mountain Power offers a rebate for individuals who make the switch. Rebates for refrigerators are $100 and freezers are $50.Don’t forget to recycle your old refrigerator responsibly and earn cash at the same time. Rocky Mountain Power will pick up the old refrigerator, recycle it and give you $30.

 

Annalisa Purser is a communications specialist at University Marketing and Communications. Got a story idea for her?  Email: annalisa.purser@utah.edu